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The lonely death of WW1 hero - ABC North Coast NSW - Australian Broadcasting Corporation

The lonely death of WW1 hero - ABC North Coast NSW - Australian Broadcasting Corporation | english1 world war 1 | Scoop.it
No-one knows how many lives his actions saved, but he was buried in a pauper's grave in Murwillumbah. Now Pte W.H. Simpkins is about to get the send-off he deserved, nearly 50 years after his passing.
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The article tells of a local WWI hero who was buried in a pauper's grave soon to be given a proper miliatry burial. The author uses parallelism in the article to show the various quotes by Sub-branch President Derek Sims about William Simpkins. 

 

"'His conduct stands pre-eminent in the work of the Corps.'

"He obviously was a very brave man.

"For him to act in that cheerful manner after two years of that, speaks heaps for the man and his way" said Mr Sims." (ABC North Branch)

 

This repitition of structure reinforces to the reader the bravery and character of Private Simpkins. The author also contrasts the merits of the award citation to the battle at Ypres, "a dreadful battlefront with enormous loss of life." (ABC North Branch). His citation was for the cheerfulness he brought in support of his fellow soldiers as they worked to move supplies to the warfront.

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First World War.com - Memoirs & Diaries - Varieties of Trench Life

First World War.com - Memoirs & Diaries - Varieties of Trench Life | english1 world war 1 | Scoop.it
First World War.com - A multimedia history of world war one
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Even though the conditions were bad John still kept going. John walked through rough conditions. "Climbing out of the river of sludge"(First). The conditions were horrible but that did not stop him from surviving. The going was hard but John never lost the will to survive. " Down among the tunnels and brick-stacks of La Bassee, trench mortars on both sides rained down their 12lb., 50 lb., 112 lb. of high explosive"(First). Living was hard but John never lost the will to survive. In describing the scale of the fight, the author's use of parallelism and rhetorical questions gives the reader a sense of the scale needed to move the army, "How many trucks from those mazes of sidings at St. Pol and Hazebrouck are needed to move a battalion?  How many trains to move a division?  And how many divisions poured into that never-ending assault - a division a day, we heard - beyond the Menin Gate, a one-way road for thousands in the British Army?" The reptitive use of the question "how many..." is the authors way to show the large numbers needed, implying that it is more than is countable.

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Sergeant Stubby: World War I’s Hero Dog

Sergeant Stubby: World War I’s Hero Dog | english1 world war 1 | Scoop.it
Stubby, a pit bull type dog, was a hero of World War I. He is the only dog that has been promoted to sergeant through combat. He served for 18 months in World War I as part of the 102nd infantry, 26th Division in France.
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The author uses analogy to compare Stubby to a soldier to show that not all pit bulls are bad. In his last sentence he states his opinion on the subject. "Today Stubby helps fight the misconception of pit bull type dogs with his story"(Life). The author clearly states his intention to the reader by this statement. In the article the author gives several examples of how Stubby was accepted as a soldier and how he behaved like one. In being "promoted to sergeant through combat", even though he was a dog he was promoted like a soldier.In describing his actions in the war, "[Stubby] was adept at locating wounded soldiers, learned to warn his unit of poison gas attacks and is even responsible for capturing a German spy"(Life). The author was comparing the dogs actions to the heroic actions of a soldier. Because Stubby was a hero in the war and helped save many lives, this dog was a perfect example to inform the readers of the positive traits of pit bulls. By talking about how the pit bull positively affected the war he was able to give examples to counter the misconception that pit bulls are agressive.

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WW1 hero's amazing diaries throw new light on life in the trenches

WW1 hero's amazing diaries throw new light on life in the trenches | english1 world war 1 | Scoop.it
Shouted to German trench 'Come on over, Fritz'. Fritz shouted back to us 'no bloomin fear'
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The author uses the diaries of John French to show the reader what life was like in the trenches. The repetivive format of the journal entries give the reader a sense of the passage of time for the important events of the writer, "Jan 1 Arrived Rouen. Had several miles to march with full kit. Feeling pretty rough - effects of sea-sickness - had a bad dose."(mirror.co.uk) Each entry tells a story about what happened to John French on that day. When an important event happened, the soldier would use simile and metaphor to better describe the events, "Nov 6 Another "push". Barrage was like a great fireworks display." (mirror.co.uk). The first hand account of a soldier in the trenches lets the reader see what it was like to experience and survive the battles of WWI.

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BBC - History - World Wars: The Last Tommy Gallery

BBC - History - World Wars: The Last Tommy Gallery | english1 world war 1 | Scoop.it
Read stories from WW1 veterans for a fascinating glimpse into the life of the soldier on the Western Front.
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First hand accounts give the reader a view into the actual events as they took place. These accounts often use metaphor and similie to give the reader a comparison to life at home, when trying to describe war. Even though the conditions were bad Arthur Barraclough kept fighting. His water was not clean and he had little food. "So when our water ration was poured out into little cups, it tasted more like petrol than it did of water"(BBC). The simile of comparing water to petrol, gives the reader a clear sense of what it was like. Even though life was uncomfortable Arthur Barraclough did not give up. Having faith helped Barraclough survive battles. "I always said a prayer before going over the top"(BBC). Saying a prayer before battle gave them hope and confidence to fight.

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Exhibit tells story of World War I hero Alvin York

Exhibit tells story of World War I hero Alvin York | english1 world war 1 | Scoop.it
NASHVILLE — Despite being one of the most famous war heroes in Tennessee history, much of Alvin York's life has remained hidden for almost a century, but a newly opened exhibit could change that.
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The article tells about a new exhibit on the WWI hero Alvin York that is to open in Nashville. The portion of the article that talks about the exhibit uses parallelism to build up from local to national importance, "[The exhibit is] important for the people of Tennessee and the people of this country" (Tanner). The exhibit is to show that Alvin York had lots of courage to take his men into battle. He fought even though the odds were against him. "York led seven soldiers against a much larger German force"(Tanner). York was brave enough to fight. His actions had a positive result."...resulted in the surrender of 132 German soldiers..."(Tanner). York had courage which led him and his men to survive the battle against much larger odds.

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