English Languages
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It's time to challenge the notion that there is only one way to speak English

It's time to challenge the notion that there is only one way to speak English | English Languages | Scoop.it
Why do we persist in thinking that standard English is right, when it is spoken by only 15% of the British population? Linguistics-loving Harry Ritchie blames Noam Chomsky

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New and learner Englishes: re-evaluating the norm orientation continuum

New and learner Englishes: re-evaluating the norm orientation continuum | English Languages | Scoop.it

Hierarchical cluster analyses in fact reveal Singapore English to be the most norm oriented, thus supporting Hundt and Vogel’s (2011) assertion that such ESL varieties can show lingering exonormative trends. Moreover, Dutch English is not markedly distinct from the New Englishes, but clusters with them in different ways depending on the focus of the analysis, e.g. like Indian English, it shows ...


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World Englishes: English as an International Language

World Englishes: English as an International Language | English Languages | Scoop.it
American and British English are not anymore the only varieties in the world. Teachers and learners should be aware of the different Englishes around the world.

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Turkey to Hire 40,000 Qualified English Teachers to Improve Turkish Foreign Language Programs

Turkey to Hire 40,000 Qualified English Teachers to Improve Turkish Foreign Language Programs | English Languages | Scoop.it

Energetic and innovative, Turkey is a country moving towards modernization at an astounding pace. Turkey’s Education Minister is planning to hire 40,000 native English-speaking teachers to assist with English language classes across the country.  The government hopes to recruit 10,000 qualified English teachers a year as a part of a four-year project to improve Turkey’s methods of English language instruction.


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Nicos Sifakis's curator insight, February 4, 2013 2:32 AM

But why native speaker only? In fact, both native and non-native teachers will collaborate in teaching these classes. But I couldn't help noticing the nativespeakerism focus."Native speaker" is not always the best solution.

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It’s official: Polish is now England’s second language

It’s official: Polish is now England’s second language | English Languages | Scoop.it

Polish is officially the second language of England with more than half-a-million people naming it as their mother tongue in the 2011 Census. The expansion of the EU in 2004 has led to a huge influx of Poles and has seen Polish, with 546,000 native speakers, overtake Punjabi as the nation’s No.2


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English as a lingua franca -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

English as a lingua franca (ELF) is the use of the English language "as a common means of communication for speakers of different first languages”.[1] ELF is also “defined functionally by its use in intercultural communication rather than formally by its reference to native-speaker norms”[2] whereas English as a foreign language aims at meeting native speaker norms and gives prominence to native speaker cultural aspects.[3] While lingua francas have been used for centuries, what makes ELF a novel phenomenon is the extent to which it is used – both functionally and geographically. A typical ELF conversation may involve an Italian and a Dane chatting at a coffee break of an international conference held in Brussels, a Spanish tourist asking a local for the way in Berlin, and many other similar situations.

The way English is used as a lingua franca is heavily dependent on the specific situation of use. Generally speaking, ELF interactions concentrate on function rather than form. In other words, communicative efficiency (i.e. getting the message across) is more important than correctness.[4] As a consequence, ELF interactions are very often hybrid.[5] Speakers accommodate to each other's cultural backgrounds and may also use code-switching into other languages that they know.[6] Based on the Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) and additional research, the following features of ELF lexicogrammar have been identified:[7][8]

However, these features are by no means invariant or “obligatory”. Rather, these forms do not seem to compromise effective communication within an ELF setting when they do occur.

English as a lingua franca (ELF) can be defined as “an additionally acquired language system which serves as a common means of communication for speakers of different first languages”. Here's the Wikipedia entry for ELF.


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Vlad Rassypninsky's curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:43 AM

The term 'English as a lingua franca (ELF)' is ambiguous since it equates English as the language of global communication in the period of globalization with other international languages (like French, German, Russian, Spanish, Arabic, Mandarin etc) which function as lingua francas in limited areas. Therefore, the more correct term would be 'English as the global lingua franca (EGLF)' to emphasize the uniqueness of the phenomenon. The failure to recognize English as the global lingua franca as a new phenomenon distinct from many national varieties, and particularly from the US and UK national standards, leads to the continued educational practicies when English is still taught as a foreign language (EFL), which promotes the linguistic and cultural domination and gives grounds to the theories of linguistic and cultural imperialism.

The acquisition by English at the turn of the 20th century of the global status has taken the world by storm, and, as a result, while the fact of the globalization of English is widely recognized, its standard is still in the process of formation, which, in its turn, creates difficulties in language learning and teaching.    

Loredana Carson's curator insight, April 29, 2013 12:11 AM

ELF students differ dramatically from domestic students in how they use English language skills throughout their graduate studies.

Vocabmonk's curator insight, September 8, 2014 8:21 AM

English as a Lingua Franca.

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The Globalization of Education

The Globalization of Education | English Languages | Scoop.it

A few decades ago, universities from the Netherlands were the first non-native English speaking institutions that presciently decided to teach a majority of their courses in English, thereby substantially widening in a stroke the universe of foreign students interested in attending their universities. At present, well over one quarter of their students are from foreign countries.


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Concern over lack of English language skills among Hong Kong students

Concern over lack of English language skills among Hong Kong students | English Languages | Scoop.it
While Hong Kong has stressed bilingualism as a key goal, the city falls far behind Singapore in English literacy, with no remedy in sight

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Why The World Is In Love With English

Why The World Is In Love With English | English Languages | Scoop.it

English is the most widely used language in the world and the third most common native language (after Mandarin Chinese and Spanish). It’s a language that can offer great beauty and massive frustration...


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