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Rescooped by James Mills from Amazing Science
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Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases

Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
The capacity of designed nucleases, like ZFNs and TALENs, to generate DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) at desired positions in the genome has created optimism for therapeutic translation of locus-directed genome engineering. ZFNs and TALENs are chimeric nucleases composed of a custom-designed DNA binding domain fused to the DNA-cleavage domain from the FokI endonuclease that upon dimer formation cleaves the DNA. ZFN- and TALEN-induced DSBs trigger genome editing through cellular repair mechanisms involving either error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) with an available DNA donor template. Designer nucleases have broad applications in biological experimentation (Urnov et al., 2010;Bogdanove and Voytas, 2011) and have been successfully utilized for the production of gene knockout model animals (Doyon et al., 2008; Geurts et al., 2009; Tesson et al., 2011) and in emerging gene therapies (Perez et al., 2008; Li et al., 2011, 2013; Sun et al., 2012).The safety of designer nucleases is of major concern in relation to their use in treatment of human diseases. Thus far, ZFNs and TALENs have been administered to cells by transfection or electroporation of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA, encoding a pair of nuclease proteins (Urnov et al., 2005; Miller et al., 2011; Carlson et al., 2012) or by exploiting viral gene vehicles such as integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) (Lombardo et al., 2007), adeno-associated virus-derived vectors (AAV vectors) (Ellis et al., 2013), or adenoviral vectors (Holkers et al., 2013). Successful administration of ZFN- or TALEN-encoding genes leads to high intracellular levels of nucleases and furthermore imposes a risk of random insertion in the genome, resulting potentially in prolonged nuclease expression and accumulating events of off-target cleavage. Ideally, ZFNs and TALENs are provided in a ‘hit-and-run’ fashion allowing short-term and dose-controllable nuclease activity without losing the effectiveness of creating locus-directed DSBs. Towards this goal, ZFNs have been fused to destabilizing domains regulated by small molecules to attenuate ZFN toxicity (Pruett-Miller et al., 2009).Moreover, by exploiting the cell-penetrating capability of ZFNs, targeted gene disruption has recently been achieved by direct cellular delivery of purified ZFN proteins (Gaj et al., 2012). Although such approach may require multiple treatments due to the reduced cellular uptake of proteins (Mellert et al., 2012), recent findings suggest that ZFN uptake may be further improved by ligand-mediated endocytosis (Chen et al., 2013). However, for gene correction by homology-directed repair such strategies would need to be combined with other means of delivering the donor template.It has been known for decades that retroviruses can tolerate the incorporation of heterologous proteins (Jones et al., 1990; Weldon et al., 1990). Lentiviral particles (LPs) have been engineered to carry foreign proteins for the purpose of visualizing the intracellular behavior of the virus during infection (McDonald et al., 2002; Jouvenet et al., 2008) and altering the viral integration profile (Bushman, 1994; Goulaouic and Chow, 1996; Bushman and Miller, 1997), as well as for ferrying antiviral (Okui et al., 2000; Ao et al., 2008) and antitumor (Link et al., 2006; Miyauchi et al., 2012) protein therapeutics. As the delicate structural composition of HIV-1-derived lentiviral particles is easily disturbed by an inappropriate load of nonviral proteins, leading to suboptimal vector yields and/or reduced transduction capability, various strategies for transducing heterologous protein cargo have been scrutinized. In early strategies, the accessory HIV-1 protein Vpr was adapted as a carrier of fused proteins (Wu et al., 1995). Recently, Vpr fusions have been shown also to ferry Cre recombinase (Michel et al., 2010) and I-SceI meganuclease (Izmiryan et al., 2011) into transduced cells. However, HIV-1 virions incorporate relatively few copies of Vpr (estimated 700 copies Vpr per virion [Swanson and Malim, 2008]), and the therapeutic potential of such approach may be hampered further by the known toxicity of the Vpr protein (Tachiwana et al., 2006).Alternatively, nonviral proteins may be packaged in LPs as part of the Gag polypeptide, as was previously shown for reporter proteins like GFP (Aoki et al., 2011) and the apoptosis-inducing caspase 3 protein (Miyauchi et al., 2012). During virion maturation, Gag is processed by the viral proteins into shorter proteins constituting the structural—and most abundant—proteins of the virus particle. It is estimated that each virion contains 5000 copies of Gag and 250 copies of GagPol (Swanson and Malim, 2008). A research team recently adapted LPs for the delivery of the piggybac DNA transposase (Cai et al., 2014). The transposase was released from Gag in the virus particles in a protease-dependent manner and found to be able to facilitate efficient DNA transposition in transduced cells. In yet another strategy, heterologous proteins fused to the integrase in the Pol region of the GagPol polypeptide were successfully delivered by protein transduction (Schenkwein et al., 2010).This present study describes the use of lentivirus-derived particles as carriers of designer nucleases for safe administration of ZFN and TALEN proteins fused to lentiviral Gag precursors. The researchers produce ZFN-loaded lentiviral particles that induce high-efficiency gene disruption with a favorable on-target/off-target ratio in safe genomic harbors like the CCR5 locus. Also, gene disruption and repair is evident in cells treated with particles carrying TALEN proteins. Successful incorporation of nuclease proteins within lentiviral particles allows co-delivery of nucleases and the donor template for homology-directed repair. The obtained findings demonstrate targeted and programmable gene repair in the human genome by delivery of both ‘scissors’ and ‘patch’ in a single combined protein and gene vehicle.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by James Mills from Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
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Bioprinting a 3D Liver-Like Device to Detoxify the Blood

Bioprinting a 3D Liver-Like Device to Detoxify the Blood | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it

Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:54 AM

"Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a 3D-printed device inspired by the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood. The device, which is designed to be used outside the body – much like dialysis – uses nanoparticles to trap pore-forming toxins that can damage cellular membranes and are a key factor in illnesses that result from animal bites and stings, and bacterial infections" (From www.mdtmag.com). 

Read the full paper: 

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140508/ncomms4774/full/ncomms4774.html


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One Drug to Shrink All Tumors

One Drug to Shrink All Tumors | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
“Antibody that blocks a "do not eat" flag on cancer cells turns the immune system against all tumor types (One Drug to Shrink All Tumors | Science/AAAS | News http://t.co/F0tnAYm1o6 via @AddThis)...”
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Rescooped by James Mills from Cyborgs_Transhumanism_NBIC
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The new #bionics that let us run, climb and dance | #health #cyborgs #Biomechatronics

The new #bionics that let us run, climb and dance | #health #cyborgs #Biomechatronics | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it

Hugh Herr is building the next generation of bionic limbs, robotic prosthetics inspired by nature's own designs. Herr lost both legs in a climbing accident 30 years ago; now, as the head of the MIT Media Lab’s Biomechatronics group, he shows his incredible technology in a talk that's both technical and deeply personal — with the help of ballroom dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis, who lost her left leg in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, and performs again for the first time on the TED stage.


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Rescooped by James Mills from Amazing Science
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World's Highest Wind Turbine Will Hover Above Alaska

World's Highest Wind Turbine Will Hover Above Alaska | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
The title for world's largest wind turbine is constantly up for grabs as manufacturers build higher and bigger to capture more energy from the passing air.One turbine in Alaska, however, will now spin high above the rest. Altaeros Energies will launch its high-altitude floating wind turbine south of Fairbanks to bring more affordable power to a remote community. Ben Glass, CEO of Altaeros told The New York Times that the company expects to provide power at about $0.18 per kilowatt-hour, about half the price of off-grid electricity in Alaska. Unlike its earth-bound brethren, the airborne turbine is not intended to supply power for large electric grids. Instead, its sweet spot is serving far-flung villages, military bases, mines, or disaster zones. Various researchers have been developing floating wind turbines for years, but the 18-month project in Alaska will be the first longer-term, commercial project to test the technology, according to Altaeros.Altaeros’ Buoyant Airborne Turbine (BAT) is an inflatable, helium-filled ring with a wind turbine suspended inside. It will float at a height of 300 meters, where winds tend to be far stronger than they are on the ground. The altitude of the BAT is about double the hub height of the world’s largest wind turbine.The BAT has a power capacity of 30 kilowatts and will create enough energy to power about 12 homes, the company says. But that’s just the beginning. It can also lift communications equipment such as cellular transceivers or meteorological devices and other sensing equipment. Altaeros said additional equipment does not affect the energy performance of the turbine. The technology can be deployed in under 24 hours, because it does not require cranes or underground foundations. Instead it uses high-strength tethers, which hold the BAT steady and allow the electricity to be sent back to the ground. A power station on the ground controls the winches that hold the tethers and pulls in the power from the turbine before sending it on to a grid connection. Altaeros has tested its BAT prototype in 70 kilometer-per-hour winds, but because it uses the same technology as other industrial blimps that are rated to withstand hurricane-level winds, it might be able to withstand stronger gusts.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Holographic imaging for rapidly sorting stem cells and cancer cells

Holographic imaging for rapidly sorting stem cells and cancer cells | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
MIT scientists have developed a way to image cells (without fluorescent markers or other labels) as they flow through a tiny microfluidic channel for sorting. This is an important step toward cell-sorting systems that could help scientists separate stem cells at varying stages of development, or to distinguish healthy cells from cancerous cells, the scientists say.Other cell-sorting methods require adding a fluorescent molecule that highlights the cells of interest, but those tags can damage the cells and make them unsuitable for therapeutic uses. The new method is based on a 2007 microscopy development that allowed the scientists to detail the interior of a living cell in three dimensions, without adding any fluorescent markers or other labels. This technique also revealed key properties, such as the cells’ density.“Many stem cell applications require sorting of cells at different stages of differentiation. This can be done with fluorescent staining, but once you stain the cells they cannot be used,” says Yongjin Sung, a former postdoc in MIT’sLaser Biomedical Research Center and lead author of a paper describing the technique in the inaugural issue of the journal PRApplied.“With our approach, you can utilize a vast amount of information about the 3-D distribution of the cells’ mass to sort them.” Instead of using fluorescent tags, the MIT method analyzes the cells’ index of refraction — a measurement of how much the speed of light is reduced as it passes through a material. Every material has a distinctive index of refraction, and this property can be used, along with cells’ volume, to calculate their mass and density.Different parts of a cell, including individual organelles, have different indices of refraction, so the information generated by this approach can also be used to identify some of these internal cell structures, such as the nucleus and nucleolus, a structure located within the nucleus.In the original 2007 version of this technology, known as tomographic phase microscopy, researchers led by the late MIT professor Michael Feld created 3-D images by combining a series of 2-D images taken as laser beams passed through cells from hundreds of different angles. This is the same concept behind CT scanning, which combines X-ray images taken from many different angles to create a 3-D rendering.A key feature of the new MIT system is the use of a focused laser beam that can illuminate cells from many different angles, allowing the researchers to analyze the scattered light from the cells as they flow across the beam. Using a technique known as off-axis digital holography, the researchers can instantaneously record both the amplitude and phase of scattered light at each location of the cells. “As the cell flows across, we can effectively illuminate the entire sample from all angles without having to rotate a light source or the cell,” says former MIT graduate student Niyom Lue, a coauthor of the new paper.The current system can image about 10 cells per second, but the researchers hope to speed it up to thousands of cells per second, which would make it useful for applications such as sorting stem cells. The researchers also hope to use the system to learn more about how cancer cells grow and respond to different drug treatments.“This label-free method can look at different states of the cell, whether they are healthy or whether they maybe have cancer or viral or bacterial infections,” says Peter So, an MIT professor of mechanical engineering and biological engineering who is senior author of the new paper. “We can use this technique to look at the pathological state of the cell, or cells under treatment of some drug, and follow the population over a period of time.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by James Mills from Amazing Science
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Faster than any human can: Lego Cubestormer 3 robot solves Rubik's Cube in 3.253 seconds

Faster than any human can: Lego Cubestormer 3 robot solves Rubik's Cube in 3.253 seconds | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
The ARM-Powered CUBESTORMER 3 robot has smashed the Guinness World Record for solving a Rubik's cube, recording a time of 3.253 seconds at the Big Bang Fair in Birmingham, UK.The robot employs an ARM-powered Samsung® Galaxy S4 smartphone powered by a Samsung Exynos 5 Octa application processor to analyze the cube and instruct four robotic hands to do the manipulations. ARM9™ processors also power the eight LEGO® MINDSTORMS® EV3 bricks which perform the motor sequencing and control.CUBESTORMER 3 was designed, built and programmed by Mike Dobson and David Gilday, creators respectively of CubeStormerhttp://youtu.be/eaRcWB3jwMo and Android Speedcuberhttp://youtu.be/ylFb4pqAUd8 and more recently, co-creators of CubeStormer II http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_d0Lfk...The custom app developed for the smartphone uses the phone's camera to capture images of each face of the Rubik's Cube which it processes to determine the scrambled colors.The solution is found using an advanced two-phase algorithm that was originally developed for Speedcuber and then enhanced to make effective use of the dual-core ARM Cortex®-A9 based processor in a Samsung Galaxy SII smartphone powered by an Exynos 5 Dual application processor used in CubeStormer II. Further optimizations were made to take advantage of the eight-core big.LITTLE™ processor configuration in the Exynos 5 Octa application processor featuring four Cortex-A15 and four Cortex-A7 processors in the Galaxy S4.Human speedcubers' solve times only include the physical manipulation of the cube and do not include some time which is allowed to "inspect" the cube beforehand. Times recorded by CUBESTORMER 3 are for the total solve including: image capture, software solution calculation and physical solve.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by James Mills from Digital Delights for Learners
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Spongelab | A Global Science Community - with science animation, images, games & more

Spongelab | A Global Science Community - with science animation, images, games & more | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
Spongelab is an online learning platform with science animations, images, videos and games integrated into a teacher content management system.

...


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Rescooped by James Mills from Energy Efficiency News and Reviews
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Clark Township is Rewarded for Energy Conservation - Equities.com

Clark Township is Rewarded for Energy Conservation - Equities.com | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
Clark Township is Rewarded for Energy ConservationEquities.comThrough the use of energy efficient technology, Clark Township has significantly reduced energy consumption and carbon emissions at the Clark Township Town Hall.

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German engineering firm EDAG's concept Genesis gives a pe...

German engineering firm EDAG's concept Genesis gives a pe... | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
SGerman engineering firm EDAG's concept Genesis gives a peek at the sweeping, sci-fi future of car design, where entire vehicle bodies are 3D printed in one piece rather than being assembled from thousands of ...
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Rescooped by James Mills from :: The 4th Era ::
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5 Science Resources For, Well, Science Teachers ~ TeachThought

5 Science Resources For, Well, Science Teachers ~ TeachThought | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it

by Dawn Casey-Rowe

 

"Truth is often stranger than fiction, and in the case of current events, there are so many science topics on the forefront of policy and society that at times it might seem that it is a script for a sci-fi movie. Everything from global warming, natural disaster, cloning, GMO, fracking debates, invasive species, medical ethics, and geopolitical issues–science is everywhere in news, politics, and world events. A lot of it is exciting if you stop a moment for consideration.

 

"This week’s Learnist feature is about science–especially weird science, which will attract the young and old alike."

 


Via Jim Lerman
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Rescooped by James Mills from La crème de la crème: The best sites for EFL, ESl learners
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WIRED : an excellent clever, thoughtful & inspiring culture blog– Future Science, Culture & Technology News and Reviews & podcasts

WIRED : an excellent clever, thoughtful & inspiring culture blog– Future Science, Culture & Technology News and Reviews & podcasts | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it

WIRED : British excellent  interesting & inspiring  excellent culture blog– Future Science, Culture & Technology News and Reviews & podcasts

And more specifically:

 

Stories, people and ideas that are changing our day-to-day world by Wired UK. The most important, interesting and inspiring news and features. Clever, witty, well-written stuff

 

 The newletter is worth suscribing



  AN excellent PODCAST Listen this week for an entertaining 30-minute look at the most interesting technology and science stories from the last seven days, with Wired.co.uk's Nate Lanxon, Olivia Solon and Liat Clark.

http://www.wired.co.uk/podcast

 

And more specifically, the  excellent blog of David Rowan, editor of Wired (Uk)

http://www.wired.co.uk/broad-topics/david-rowan%27s-blog

 

The Wired News iPhone, Android, Windows Phone and BlackBerry apps:

 

"The Wired.co.uk news you care about, now available to pockets everywhere! The Wired News app brings up-to-the-minute coverage of the latest technology, science, culture and business news directly to your iPhone, Android, Windows Phone or BlackBerry -- no matter where you are."

Download now to:

- Read all the latest Wired.co.uk news stories
- Listen to the Wired.co.uk Podcast on-demand (iOS)
- Read the latest comments from the team on Twitter

 

 


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Rescooped by James Mills from HCS Learning Commons Newsletter
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The 25 Must Have Resources for Science Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The 25 Must Have Resources for Science Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
RT @gormang: The 25 Must Have Resources for Science Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/dNDunq23L7 #nevikings…

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, February 24, 2014 11:21 AM

Science resources for all ages. 

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New technique helps identify proteins involved in immune response

New technique helps identify proteins involved in immune response | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
“ (Phys.org) —A new technique developed at the University of Cambridge allows researchers to identify clusters of proteins on immune cells which are key to fighting off the body's invaders.”
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Rescooped by James Mills from Sports Engineering
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OMsignal unveils 'biometric smartwear' T-shirts for fitness geeks, quantified selfers

OMsignal unveils 'biometric smartwear' T-shirts for fitness geeks, quantified selfers | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
“ OMsignal unveils 'biometric smartwear' T-shirts for fitness geeks, quantified ...”
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Rescooped by James Mills from Digital Marketing News
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This Technology Lets You Send a Text Without Touching a Single Button - TheBlaze.com

This Technology Lets You Send a Text Without Touching a Single Button - TheBlaze.com | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
“ Paste Magazine This Technology Lets You Send a Text Without Touching a Single Button TheBlaze.com Ring operates on gesture recognition technology (Image via Logbar).”
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Rescooped by James Mills from Amazing Science
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Stanford Study: 100% Renewable Energy Is Feasible and Affordable

Stanford Study: 100% Renewable Energy Is Feasible and Affordable | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
One of the greatest promises of the high-tech future, whether made explicitly or implicitly through shiny clean concept sketches, is that we will have efficient energy that doesn’t churn pollutants into the air and onto the streets.But here in the present, politicians and even many clean energy advocates maintain that a world run on hydrogen and wind, water and solar power is not yet possible due to technical challenges like energy storage and cost.Yet Stanford University researchers led by civil engineer Mark Jacobson have developed detailed plans for each state in the union that to move to 100 percent wind, water and solar power by 2050 using only technology that’s already available. The plan, presented recently at the AAAS conference in Chicago, also forms the basis for The Solutions Project nonprofit.“The conclusion is that it’s technically and economically feasible,” states Jacobson. The plan doesn’t rely, like many others, on dramatic energy efficiency regimes. Nor does it include biofuels or nuclear power, whose green credentials are the source of much debate.The proposal is straightforward: eliminate combustion as a source of energy, because it’s dirty and inefficient. All vehicles would be powered by electric batteries or by hydrogen, where the hydrogen is produced through electrolysis rather than natural gas. High-temperature industrial processes would also use electricity or hydrogen combustion.The rest would simply be a question of allowing existing fossil-fuel plants to age out and using renewable sources to power any new plants that come online. The energy sources in the road map include geothermal energy, concentrating solar power, off-shore and on-land wind turbines and some and tidal energy. All but tidal energy collectors are already commercially available.Clean energy would save an average American consumer $3,400 per year than the current fossil fuel regime by 2050, the study lays out. That’s because the price of fossil fuel rises regularly, but with clean energy — where raw materials are free — once the infrastructure is built, prices would fall.Jacobson has previously mapped out a similar proposal for the global energy market, including China. A related plan with a greater emphasis on efficiency was recently released by the World Wildlife Fund.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by James Mills from Sports Engineering
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Oakley is building the ultimate smart sports glasses, here's how they're doing it

Oakley is building the ultimate smart sports glasses, here's how they're doing it | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
“ Oakley is building the ultimate smart sports glasses, here's how they're doing it Stuff Middle East We sat down with Ryan Calilung, Director of R&D, and Ryan Saylor, Director of Optical Development, to chat about what's next for 2012′s HUD ski...”
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Rescooped by James Mills from Science and Global Education Trends
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Chemistry of Acid Rain

Chemistry of Acid Rain | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
“ Any form of precipitation which is acidic in nature is called acid rain. Acid rain is the result of excessive emissions of sulfur and nitrogen caused by human activity, which reacts with other compounds to form acids. Acid rain has detrimental effects on animals, plants and infrastructure.”
Via Lenae Ruffner Scafidi, Kathy Bosiak
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Rescooped by James Mills from Computational approaches for protein engineering and design
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Expanding Anfinsen’s Principle: Contributions of Synonymous Codon Selection to Rational Protein Design

Expanding Anfinsen’s Principle: Contributions of Synonymous Codon Selection to Rational Protein Design | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it

Abstract

Anfinsen’s principle asserts that all information required to specify the structure of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. However, during protein synthesis by the ribosome, the N-terminus of the nascent chain can begin to fold before the C-terminus is available. We tested whether this cotranslational folding can alter the folded structure of an encoded protein in vivo, versus the structure formed when refolded in vitro. We designed a fluorescent protein consisting of three half-domains, where the N- and C-terminal half-domains compete with each other to interact with the central half-domain. The outcome of this competition determines the fluorescence properties of the resulting folded structure. Upon refolding after chemical denaturation, this protein produced equimolar amounts of the N- and C-terminal folded structures, respectively. In contrast, translation in Escherichia coli resulted in a 2-fold enhancement in the formation of the N-terminal folded structure. Rare synonymous codon substitutions at the 5′ end of the C-terminal half-domain further increased selection for the N-terminal folded structure. These results demonstrate that the rate at which a nascent protein emerges from the ribosome can specify the folded structure of a protein.


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Bernard Offmann's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:48 AM

This very nice paper was quoted by Catherine Goodman in Nature Chemical Biology (Protein Folding; The Inside Scoop).(http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/v10/n3/full/nchembio.1465.html)

It shows elegantly how codon usage can affect folding.

Rescooped by James Mills from Adult Stem Cells Repair Body
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Stanford creates first PhD program in stem cell science | "Latest Stem Cells News"

Stanford creates first PhD program in stem cell science | "Latest Stem Cells News" | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it

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EJ Morris's curator insight, December 5, 2013 12:43 PM

Stem Cells are the Present..and the FUTURE of Wellness and regenerative medicine ...and I don't have a PhD in STEM CELL SCIENCE..  ( Yet ) , ...  but I sure know stem cells are keeping me  Youthful .. and ALIVE.. (specifically, )  my Adult Stem Cells are rejuvenating , renewing and healing my worn and aging tissues and organs ...  Listen to Christian Drapeau, a noted stem cell scientist and best selling stem cell science author , here..

http://www.adult-stemcells-blog.com/stem-cell-scientist.html

 

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Engineers design 'living materials' - MIT News

Engineers design 'living materials' - MIT News | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
Science Recorder Engineers design 'living materials' MIT News Inspired by natural materials such as bone — a matrix of minerals and other substances, including living cells — MIT engineers have coaxed bacterial cells to produce biofilms that can...
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Complicated Military Aircrafts │ Engineering and Manufacture │Documentary │

Complex Cyber--Physical Systems (CCPS) research in the School of MIME focuses on the design, modeling, analysis, and operation of cyber--physical systems whe...
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Watch: Scientists 'herd' cells in new approach to tissue engineering

Watch: Scientists 'herd' cells in new approach to tissue engineering | Engineering and sciences | Scoop.it
UC Berkeley engineers have found that an electrical current can be used to orchestrate the flow of a group of cells. This achievement sets the stage for more controlled forms of tissue engineering and for potential applications ...
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Rescooped by James Mills from ClassTeacherLearningSystem
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Train Your Child with Online Science Projects | Classteacher | Mind Shaper Technologies


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The really N.O.'s curator insight, May 19, 2014 3:20 PM

Cleverly fun? Well this is a project for the one thing I love + it's for kids!