Engaging students in learning
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Using Feedback to Empower Learners

Using Feedback to Empower Learners | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
The most successful companies are successful because they are always looking for ways to improve.  When it comes to their employees, there is no ceiling as they are continually pursuing pathways and allocating resources to help the best get even better. The same philosophy can be applied to our schools. Continuous feedback for all learners, regardless of their abilities or where they are at, is pivotal if the goal is to help them evolve into their best. The research fully supports this proclamation.  Goodwin & Miller (2012) provided this summary:
In Marzano, Pickering, and Pollock's 2001 meta-analysis, McREL researchers found an effect size for feedback of 0.76, which translates roughly into a 28-percentile point difference in average achievement (Beesley & Apthorp, 2010; Dean, Pitler, Hubbell, & Stone, 2012). John Hattie (2009) found a similar effect size of 0.73 for feedback in his synthesis of 800 meta-analyses of education research studies; in fact, feedback ranked among the highest of hundreds of education practices he studied.
The bottom line here is that feedback matters in the context of learning. It should also be noted how it differs from assessment. Feedback justifies a grade, establishes criteria for improvement, provides motivation for the next assessment, reinforces good work, and serves as a catalyst for reflection. The assessment determines whether learning occurred, what learning occurred, and if the learning relates to stated targets, standards, and objectives. In reality, formative assessment is an advanced form of feedback. 

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Building authentic connections with high school students

Building authentic connections with high school students | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it

Four tips for building authentic connections with your teen students.


 


Teenagers who feel that you care about them will be more receptive to your requests and more respectful of you as a teacher. Bonus: Students who feel valued by you will be more willing to take risks for you, and we know how essential this is to the learning process.


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How To Design A 21st Century Assessment - TeachThought

How To Design A 21st Century Assessment - TeachThought | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
Contemporary curriculum design involves multiple facets: engaging 21st Century skills, using digital tools, collaborating with others around the globe, performance tasks, and more. Getting these design elements into a teacher’s current curriculum demands that teachers create professional habits around Replacement Thinking.

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A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories [Infographic]

A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories [Infographic] | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
Do you know the actual theories of learning? A learning theory is an attempt to describe how people learn, helping us understand this inherently complex process.

Via Gust MEES, Made Hery Santosa, Roselink, Carmen Arias , Rui Guimarães Lima, Alfredo Calderón, REDaprendiendo, Laura Rosillo, Carlos Marcelo, Elena Elliniadou, Nikos Amanatidis, Steven Verjans, catspyjamasnz
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Manuela Bazen's curator insight, February 16, 2013 9:34 AM

De leertheorieën mooi overzichtelijk bij elkaar!

Kari Smith's curator insight, February 17, 2013 1:17 PM

Great background information to build our understanding. I really like seeing them all presented this way for easy comparison. 

Christine Cattermole's curator insight, May 16, 2013 4:58 AM

A very visual illustration of learning theory.

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20 Ways To Provide Effective Feedback For Learning -

20 Ways To Provide Effective Feedback For Learning - | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
Feedback for learning is a matter of communication, consistency, and tone, all driven by and for assessment practice.

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How to Provide Effective Feedback and Improve the Learning Experience

How to Provide Effective Feedback and Improve the Learning Experience | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
Help students achieve goals, move forward, and excel by providing effective feedback to improve the overall learning experience.

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4 Simple Researched-Based Ways To Maximize Your Teaching

4 Simple Researched-Based Ways To Maximize Your Teaching | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
And the research says...

These four simple research-based strategies could have a big effect on your teaching success.
1. Focus on One at a Time
In the first month of school, choose two students (two “hard nuts to crack”). After each lesson and assessment, try to figure out what worked for these students in particular and use those insights to plan your instruction. Homing in on one or two students, says Wendy Baron, chief academic officer of the New Teacher Center, helps teachers “see the difference they make…and it builds a level of persistence.” This kind of focus has surprising benefits, as the effective intervention spills over to the rest of the class. Next month, choose two more “focal points.”
2. Think About How Kids Think
Don’t worry as much about the right answer as how your students get there. Constructed responses, essay questions, or oral responses will give you an idea of how kids think, providing much more information than multiple choice. Even in math, give short-answer questions that require kids to explain their thinking.
3. Go Visiting
Here’s a goal: Three times this year, spend an hour or two in the classroom of a colleague whom you admire. It’s amazing what you can learn by watching a teacher at the top of her game, particularly if she has a style similar to your own.
4. Get It on Tape
Charlotte Danielson, author of Talk About Teaching!, suggests you watch yourself teach and then reflect on your lesson. “Videotape a lesson, and watch and discuss it with colleagues,” says Danielson. “Those are very rich conversations.”
As you watch, consider your students’ points of view. How are you at explaining concepts in a variety of ways? Who’s doing the work in the room — are you spending a lot of time having the kids watch you model, or are the students challenged to solve problems on their own? “One of the things that we know about learning,” says Danielson, “is it only happens when the learner is doing the thinking.”

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Formative vs Summative Assessment-Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation - Carnegie Mellon University

Formative vs Summative Assessment-Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation - Carnegie Mellon University | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it

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ASCD EDge - 6 Practical Formative Assessment Tips

ASCD EDge - 6 Practical Formative Assessment Tips | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
Don’t emphasize grading over learning. Your goal should be to help students master the content, not to collect a grade.

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Assessments for Today's Students

Assessments for Today's Students | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
Kristina Doubet, Heather Wolpert-Gawron, Thomas Guskey, Thom Markham and Nancy Sulla contribute their thoughts on assessment in today's classroom.

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Visualizing 21st-Century Classroom Design

Visualizing 21st-Century Classroom Design | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
These five steps are essential in creating a 21st-century classroom: establishing zones, ensuring resource accessibility, encouraging mobility, igniting inspiration, and fostering respect.

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Stop Innovating in Schools. Please. — Modern Learning

Stop Innovating in Schools. Please. - Modern Learning - Medium
Too often when we talk about “innovation” in education, we point to that new set of Chromebooks or those shiny new Smart…

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Beyond Engagement: Making School Personal — by Mike Crowley

Beyond Engagement: Making School Personal - The Synapse - Medium
Engagement matters, but we have to think beyond engagement. — David Price

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Students Learn More When THEY Do the Work -@Catlin_Tucker

Students Learn More When THEY Do the Work -@Catlin_Tucker | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
A major barrier to innovation in the classroom is teacher exhaustion. I regularly work with teachers who like the idea of trying new teaching strategies, blended learning models, and technology tools, but they don’t have the time or energy to experiment.

When I work with teachers, my goal is to get them to shift their mindsets. Instead of asking themselves, “How can I?” I want them to pause and rephrase the question, “How can students?” This shift in teacher mindset seems simple, yet it goes against most teachers’ instincts. We place a lot of pressure on ourselves to do it all. Unfortunately, that mentality robs students of opportunities to learn.

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Infographic: The-Holy-Trinity-of-Effective-eLearning 

Infographic: The-Holy-Trinity-of-Effective-eLearning  | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it

The-Holy-Trinity-of-Effective-eLearning-Infographic


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The Effectiveness of Online Learning Depends on Design |

The Effectiveness of Online Learning Depends on Design | | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
As students of all ages spend more time learning online, it's worth asking, 'How effective is online learning?' The answer varies dramatically and depends entirely on the design of the online learning experience. For the purpose of this blog, I

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Dinah Galligo's curator insight, March 7, 10:14 AM
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Elizabeth Dalton's curator insight, March 9, 8:41 AM
An interesting and relevant blog by Caitlin Tucker.  She discusses design in relation to situated learning theory, using Content, Context, Community of Practice, and Participation as organizing principles for developing effectively designed online instruction.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 28, 9:21 AM
Designing online courses
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Questions to Ask Oneself While Designing Learning Activities ^ User Generated Education ^ by Jackie Gerstein

Questions to Ask Oneself While Designing Learning Activities ^ User Generated Education ^ by Jackie Gerstein | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it

"I absolutely love planning lessons from scratch.  I just got a job teaching technology units for a summer camp for elementary age students. I can design and teach whatever I want – planning for a different theme each week. Some of the themes I am planning are: Expanding and Showing Your Personal Interests Through Blogging, Photos, and Videos; Coding and Creating Online Games; Tinkering and Making – Simple Robotics; Hacking Your Notebook; and Creating Online Comics, Newspapers, and Magazines.  I have begun the process of planning these classes through reflecting on what the lessons will look like.  Here are some questions I ask myself as I go through this process:"


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Critical Thinking in the 21st Century and Beyond via Eric Sheninger

Critical Thinking in the 21st Century and Beyond via Eric Sheninger | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
A blog about digital leadership, pedagogy, learning, and transformative change in education.

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Dale Barram's curator insight, April 30, 10:12 PM
This article gave the reader an insight into what impacts a great teacher can have on learning and how this can motivate students to learn.  
In reading this article it has reinforced with me the need and importance of having good pedagogy to teach effectively. Moreover, it has given me the inspiration to ensure that I teach in a way that enables students to love learning.
 
Tanya Krause's curator insight, May 20, 12:21 AM
Thanks Paul... I discovered that the image of the left brain relates alot to the General Capabilities in Technology. 
2
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8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning via teachthought

8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning via teachthought | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it

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RESENTICE's curator insight, September 26, 2016 9:21 AM

ou comment rendre l'apprentissage plus efficace à l'aide d'un questionnement personnel journalier des élèves sur ce qu'ils retiennent de leur journée de classe ?

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28 Student-Centered Instructional Strategies -

28 Student-Centered Instructional Strategies - | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
28 Student-Centered Instructional Strategies by TeachThought Staff Student-centered teaching is teaching designed for the student. This means that planning often begins with the student in mind as opposed [...]

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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.


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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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How To Use Learning Battle Cards Maps in E-Learning

How To Use Learning Battle Cards Maps in E-Learning | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it

"Apart from all theories and taxonomies behind, Instructional Design is a creative process. While designing new things you need not only knowledge about rules, frameworks, and best practices, but also sparks of inspiration which will lead you to innovative solutions. Here is how to be inspired by Learning Battle Cards maps."


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27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students

27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students by TeachThought Staff Innovating thinking is one of those awkward concepts in education--on
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Harriet Rolfe's curator insight, May 25, 2016 10:23 PM

I like the concepts in this article- however I would love a bit more practical advice at how I extend my teaching strategies to promote innovative thinking

Lacey Mack's curator insight, May 28, 2016 10:09 PM
Not only is the diagram attractive, it has some excellent points. Links with the flipped classroom approach and State Schooling Explicit Instruction
Stephania Savva, Ph.D's comment, June 3, 2016 2:11 AM
Thanks for sharing this interesting article!
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Technology Resources to Help Foster a Growth Mindset in Your Students — via Kelly Walsh

Technology Resources to Help Foster a Growth Mindset in Your Students — via Kelly Walsh | Engaging students in learning | Scoop.it
“Growth Mindset” is Much More Than Just Another Buzz Word Your may have noticed the growing focus (pun intended!) on the power of the “growth mindset” in education in the last few years. Some have worked to debunk it, but a

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Maeve's curator insight, March 21, 2016 9:33 AM

(1) Yes, I agree with what the author says. Many people are using technology for education.

(2) Yes I foresee things to be different in future as technology have come so far and now students are using technology to study better.

(3) When everyone is using technology to help with their studies everyone would then rely on technology more and then they would get very dependent on it. And it is not very good as technology can fail unexpectedly.

(4) Many people will benefit from it as Technology can give them a wide variety of knowledge and we get to learn new things with technology.

(5) This is not fool proof.

Maeve's curator insight, March 21, 2016 9:35 AM

(1) Yes, I agree with what the author says. Many people are using technology for education.

(2) Yes I foresee things to be different in future as technology have come so far and now students are using technology to study better.

(3) When everyone is using technology to help with their studies everyone would then rely on technology more and then they would get very dependent on it. And it is not very good as technology can fail unexpectedly.

(4) Many people will benefit from it as Technology can give them a wide variety of knowledge and we get to learn new things with technology.

(5) This is not fool proof.

Maeve's curator insight, March 21, 2016 10:18 AM

(1) Yes, I agree with what the author says. Many people are using technology for education.

(2) Yes I foresee things to be different in future as technology have come so far and now students are using technology to study better.

(3) When everyone is using technology to help with their studies everyone would then rely on technology more and then they would get very dependent on it. And it is not very good as technology can fail unexpectedly.

(4) Many people will benefit from it as Technology can give them a wide variety of knowledge and we get to learn new things with technology.

(5) This is not fool proof.