energyeficiencyaudits
17 views | +0 today
Follow
energyeficiencyaudits
energyeficiencyaudits
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by EnergyEfficiencyA12
Scoop.it!

Dehumidification

One of the problems we come across during our inspections is Air Conditioning Dehumidification Problems : This is where the air conditioning system cools but does not dehumidify the room. The most common cause of inadequate dehumidification by an air conditioning system is the installation of a cooling unit, which has too much capacity, or is "over-sized" for the space it is being used to cool. What happens then is simple: If an air conditioning compressor unit is oversized (too many BTUH of cooling capacity) what happens is it cools the room so quickly that the system does not move enough total volume of air across the cooling coil to remove much moisture before the room temperature has dropped to the air conditioning cut-off point. In other words, an air conditioner needs to run longer, and move more total volume of air through itself to drop room humidity than it does to just cool the air. So "bigger" cooling capacity or higher BTU capacity for an air conditioning system is not necessarily better, it can actually be a problem. The main symptom is if your cooling system is otherwise working normally, and it cools the room temperature quickly but the room humidity stays high, an over-sized unit is likely to be the problem. System Checks First, make sure that the equipment is operating properly and is cooling - check that temperatures are dropping normally when the system is running. Check that there is not an abnormal moisture source such as leaks into the building or its wall or ceiling cavities from any other source. Check to see if the condensate drain from the air conditioner is producing water. If you see lots of a/c condensate dripping out of the system condensate drain but room humidity is still high, there may be an abnormal humidity source. Adjust the a/c unit controls to increase dehumidification and discuss with your HVAC service engineer whether there are technical changes that might be made to fan speed or other controls that might improve a/c dehumidification. Try increasing the cooling load on the installed air conditioner by making it cool a larger area – for example, leave the doors open to other rooms. This may alleviate the problem but is not always a suitable solution. Unfortunately, in the case of an oversized unit the fix is to replace the unit with one that is the right size for the job. Alternatively, a dehumidifier can be added to try to balance the humidity but this is an additional energy usage overhead. Remember that condensation can create problems with dampness and may lead to black mould, which is a health hazard, so we always advise that this situation should be rectified especially in an enclosed area where people are working.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by EnergyEfficiencyA12
Scoop.it!

Critical Equipment Defects in Air Conditioning

Often our air conditioning inspections will show up some critical defects in air conditioning equipment. In this article, we describe some typical defects we have encountered in the course of our inspections. We have standard checklists to use where we list the types of critical problems that we find in air conditioning or heat pump systems. This air conditioning/heat pump inspection guide lists critical air conditioning system defects which a building inspector or owner will always be should always be made aware once their air conditioning inspection is completed. Critical defects fall into two kinds. The first critical defect will be when examination of a building component and equipment present an immediate, significant safety hazard. Further defects are those likely to involve significant repair or replacement cost, and also involve components or systems, which are necessary to occupy and use the building. Some defects are shown here: Air conditioning compressor needs replacement. Cooling is delivered to only part of the building, e.g. only to one floor. Unsafe return air intake which may draw in carbon monoxide at heating equipment indicating possible duct defects which could indirectly distribute toxic mould, gases or chemicals. Uneven air supply resulting in uneven temperatures. Inadequate cooling capacity for building. Low temperature split (indicating inadequate cooling due to refrigerant leak. Refrigerant leaks at condenser or evaporator coils (usually requires replacement of coil.) Dirty air handler. (Major expense to clean properly.) Leaking return ducts in crawl space. Unsafe electrical wiring showing evidence of overheating or over fusing at the service cut-off, in the electrical panel and service cut-off by the compressor/condenser We sometimes find that air conditioning systems have not been allowed adequate time to power up. Many air conditioning systems must be left with power turned on for twenty-four hours prior to running the equipment. This allows heaters at the compressors to assure good oil flow in those components. Operating the equipment without this power up process risks very costly damage to the compressor.
more...
No comment yet.