Empathy in the Arts
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Empathy in the Arts
Empathy and Compassion in the Arts (Drawing, Writing, Stories, Poetry, Music, Dance, Fine Art, etc) - CultureOfEmpathy.com
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The Empathy Exams - A MEDICAL ACTOR WRITES HER OWN SCRIPT

The Empathy Exams - A MEDICAL ACTOR WRITES HER OWN SCRIPT | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

My job title is Medical Actor, which means I play sick. I get paid by the hour. Medical students guess my maladies. I’m called a Standardized Patient, which means I act toward the norms of my disorders. I’m standardized-lingo SP for short. I’m fluent in the symptoms of preeclampsia and asthma and appendicitis. I play a mom whose baby has blue lips.

Medical acting works like this: you get a script and a paper gown. You get $13.50 an hour. Our scripts are ten to twelve pages long. They outline what’s wrong with us—not just what hurts but how to express it. They tell us how much to give away, and when. We are supposed to unfurl the answers according to specific protocols.

The scripts dig deep into our fictive lives: the ages of our children and the diseases of our parents, the names of our husbands’ real-estate and graphic-design firms, the amount of weight we’ve lost in the past year, the amount of alcohol we drink each week.


by Leslie Jamison 

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Oculus Rift Used in Empathy Experiments: Step into Someone’s Views

Oculus Rift Used in Empathy Experiments: Step into Someone’s Views | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

We’ve seen people use the Oculus Rift tosimulate beheadings. BeAnotherLab used the virtual reality headset for something less morbid but no less interesting. The organization’s The Machine to be Anotherwas an “artistic investigation” in which the Rift was used to give participants first person views from actual people.

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Using Theatre and Drama to Increase Empathy in Students

Using Theatre and Drama to Increase Empathy in Students | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

There are very few “provable” things in arts education, but one thing that has been “proven” over the years in educational research is that theatre education increases empathy in students.

 

 Empathy, or the ability to understand another person’s feelings or circumstances, is a critical skill for an actor. It is how we are able to portray people who are very different from ourselves. We must imagine what it would be like to undergo the circumstances of the play in order to honesty represent those emotions and conditions on stage in a believable way.


Empathy in the classroom does not need to rise to the level of believable impersonation, but increased empathy is very helpful to students as they relate to each other and to their worlds. By integrating drama into the classroom, teachers can help students increase their empathy and meet non-arts curricular goals as well.

 

Joan Weber Director, Education Division, Creativity & Associates 

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Creating Character Empathy, Part One: having empathy as a writer

Creating Character Empathy, Part One: having empathy as a writer | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
If a writer feels nothing for her characters, how can we expect the reader to feel something? Our lack of emotional investment will show on the page. Our characters will feel wooden, stereotypical, and lacking in life. Here are some ideas for developing empathy with your characters. 1. Know your characterTo feel empathy for our characters, we need to know them like we know our best friends in real life. We need to know their strengths, flaws, quirks, fears, insecurities, and what makes them laugh Karen Schravemade
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Empathy, original painting by artist Kim Roberti | DailyPainters.com

Empathy, original painting by artist Kim Roberti | DailyPainters.com | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
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Does reading literature increase empathy?

Does reading literature increase empathy? | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Here's a report on a series of studies that purport to show that reading a few minutes of "literary fiction" improves scores on a test of emotional empathy ("Reading the Mind in the Eyes"), compared to reading non-fiction. Reading popular fiction did nothing to improve scores over those of non-reading controls.

New York Times

People ranging in age from 18 to 75 were recruited for each of five experiments. They were paid $2 or $3 each to read for a few minutes. Some were given excerpts from award-winning literary fiction (Don DeLillo, Wendell Berry). Others were given best sellers like Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl,” a Rosamunde Pilcher romance or a Robert Heinlein science fiction tale.

 

...As I have suggested before, I would rather engage in psychotherapy with a therapist who reads Dostoevsky and Melville than with one who reads books about the brain. It would be lovely if a case could be built that shows that the reading of literature can make you a better (e.g., more empathetic) person.

 

by Glenn Sullivan 

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Brenda J. Alegria's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:15 PM

I found this article intresting in how studies were conducted to see if reading fiction increases empathy skills. 

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Book News: Reading Fiction May Boost Empathy, and Other Stories from the Week

Book News: Reading Fiction May Boost Empathy, and Other Stories from the Week | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that reading literary fiction may have a positive effect on social skills.

 

The results of a new study published Thursday in Science suggest that reading literary fiction may have a positive effect on social skills. The researchers, David Comer Kidd and Emanuele Castano, who are social psychologists at the New School for Social Research, in New York City, found that subjects who were asked to read just a few minutes of literary fiction, such as works by Don DeLillo or Alice Munro, performed better on subsequent tests measuring empathy, social perception, and emotional intelligence than subjects who were given nonfiction from Smithsonian Magazine or popular fiction like Danielle Steel or Gillian Flynn. Though the study leaves many questions unanswered—like how “literary” the fiction has to be to have an impact, or how long the empathy boost lasts—the researchers hope that studies like this one, which demonstrate the quantifiable benefits of reading literature, could have an impact on curriculum design in schools. (TheCommon Core standards have attracted criticism for emphasizing nonfiction over literature.)


POSTED BY RACHEL ARONS

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Novel Finding: Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy: Scientific American

Novel Finding: Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy: Scientific American | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
The types of books we read may affect how we relate to others

 

How important is reading fiction in socializing school children? Researchers at The New School in New York City have found evidence that literary fiction improves a reader’s capacity to understand what others are thinking and feeling.

 

Emanuele Castano, a social psychologist, along with PhD candidate David Kidd conducted five studies in which they divided a varying number of participants (ranging from 86 to 356) and gave them different reading assignments: excerpts from genre (or popular) fiction, literary fiction, nonfiction or nothing. After they finished the excerpts the participants took a test that measured their ability to infer and understand other people’s thoughts and emotions. The researchers found, to their surprise, a significant difference between the literary- and genre-fiction readers.

 

By Julianne Chiaet

 

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Empathy a new contemporary dance work

Empathy a new contemporary dance work | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Artistically led by Adrienne Hart, Neon Dance produces visually stunning and socially apt performance work, combining dance with original music and digital media

 

‘Empathy’ is a new contemporary dance work created by Neon’s Adrienne Hart. The piece explores the human empathy spectrum through movement, sound and set; each component designed to affect and provoke. Empathy will attempt to lure its audience into moments of feeling and unfeeling, but ultimately it is a reflection on how and why we relate to one another in an age of entanglement.

Empathy will be a full-length (60-minute) dance work featuring both live and recorded sound.

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Empathy | People United

Empathy | People United | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Empathy – Sarah Woods

Monday 10th June, 2013 “I believe that empathy is a feeling of understanding, a feeling for others, It’s a beginning of a relationship”. Marzena Forristal As part of the creation of THE EMPATHY ROADSHOW, I’ve been doing filmed interviews with people for whom empathy is a key part of their daily lives. I ask them much the same things as I asked Christian Keysers, the neuroscientist. My first interview was with Marzena Forristal, a hairdresser in South London who runs WINK HAIR SALON. I asked her to define empathy and she talked about it as the ‘beginning of a relationship’. This is exactly what Christian said to me. 

Our empathy commission is in association with Kent County Council.

The commission:

We are interested in how the arts have the potential to spark emotions such as concern, compassion and sympathy, enabling a better understanding of others and looking at things from a different perspective.

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New Kids Songs Teaching Empathy

New Kids Songs Teaching Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Introducing three empathy songs written and performed by Theresa Tan!

 

My two passions, education and music, collided when I decided to write kids songs to help teach empathy. Although I had never written songs before, I was inspired by Start Empathy's mission. What better way to teach young children than through song? In addition to being naturally engaging, studies indicate that the act of playing music may also boost kids' empathy.

 

As I set out to write the empathy songs, I drew heavily from my experience as a kindergarten teacher and cellist. I designated an emotional literacy learning objective to each song. Then I translated the objectives into kid-friendly lyrics. (The rhyming dictionary definitely came in handy during in this process.) Meanwhile, I brainstormed and tested out melodies with the words. My time spent improvising in an Americana band, playing in orchestras, and simply listening to other kids songs helped immensely. After several editing rounds, I came out with three initial songs.

 

By Theresa Tan

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Are You in the Business of Empathy? |

Are You in the Business of Empathy? | | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Before last night’s performance began, Bill English, Artistic Director at San Francisco Playhouse, had the following to say about empathy:

Our theatre is an empathy gym where we come to practice our powers of compassion. Nelson Mandella, Martin Luther King, Mother Theresa, Ghandi; these are the Olympic athletes of empathy. But the rest of us need to go to the gym. It’s tough to be compassionate in everyday life. . . . It’s tough to be empathetic. But from the darkness and anonymity of our seats, we are safe to risk entering into the lives of the characters on the other side of the proscenium. We feel what they feel, fear what they fear, love what they love, and hope for what they hope for. And along the way, with our one hundred hearts beating together in the dark, we realize that under the skin we are the same. And as we leave, we take that miraculous spirit of unity out into the world to make it better.

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Study: Music Can Induce Empathy

Study: Music Can Induce Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Press Release

-- According to a new study, empathy is something that can be learned and taught. The research was conducted at the University of Cambridge and the results were published in the Psychology of Music (July 2013). The lead author of the study, Tal-Chen Rabinowitch, predicts that one day school districts will have the option to add “empathy education” to their curriculum. “Perhaps the most important thing the study tells us about the development of emotional empathy is that it is amenable to intervention,” Rabinowitch said. “We now have the (very friendly and enjoyable) tools to influence and enhance emotional empathy in children, a significant building block for shaping a more empathic and other-minded society.”

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Debra Manchester's curator insight, August 2, 2013 11:20 AM

Music is the universal language. See a wonderful example of music and lessons to build social and emotional intelligence in children at KidsEps.org.

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Ten Ways to Create Character Empathy | Christian Writers Guild

Ten Ways to Create Character Empathy | Christian Writers Guild | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

At the Writing for the Soul conference, one of my six fiction classes will focus on creating immediate character empathy — in your novel’s first chapter.'

Why create empathy? Because even in a plot-driven story, characters areeverything. The most intriguing plot will fail if a reader doesn’t care about your characters.

 Most of these methods work best when combined with at least one other. (In the Writing for the Soul class, I’ll go into more detail about each.)

 Readers will empathize if the character is:

1. Clearly displaying a valued trait ...


By Brandilyn Collins

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The Machine to be Another

The Machine to be Another | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

More than individuals, we are part of a social collective called humanity. As members of this collective, the perception of our own identity is based on our relation with other people and our social environment: how people see us, how we do act and interact with them, and what self image we project to this society and to ourselves.

 

As part of this collective society, it is clear the importance of understanding the ‘Other’ and ‘Each Other’ to better understand ourselves. This artistic investigation plans to use the recent neuroscience approach of ‘embodiment’ and apply it to investigate the perception and comprehension about the Self based on the comprehension of the “Other”.

 

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Empathy

Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Empathy
A Poem by Arrinae'

This swirling storm around me,
It numbs my heart.
Slowly, but surely,
Its tearing my apart.

I can't stop it, no,

Though it overwhelms me so easily.The pain and turmoil I feel,

From taking their pain and misery.

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Theory of Mind: Why Art Evokes Empathy

Theory of Mind: Why Art Evokes Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

We have a sense of empathy with works of art.  If we see gestures in a portrait, we actually almost simulate those gestures in our mind.  We often implicitly act as if we are moving our arms in response empathically to what we see in the painting. 

 

We also respond empathically to what we think the sitter is experiencing in their head.  So we have what is called “a theory of mind” in which when I look at you, I have a sense of where you’re going and you have a sense of where I’m going. We have an enormous capability by just looking at the person we are interacting with, and particularly if we’re having a conversation, to predict certain aspects of future events simply by looking at them.  This is an extraordinary capability that human beings have. 

 

by ERIC KANDEL 

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Leo Tolstoy on Emotional Infectiousness and What Separates Good Art from Bad - art as a vehicle of communication and empathy:

Leo Tolstoy on Emotional Infectiousness and What Separates Good Art from Bad - art as a vehicle of communication and empathy: | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

A real work of art destroys, in the consciousness of the receiver, the separation between himself and the artist."


Tolstoy puts forth a sentiment Susan Sontag would come to echo decades later in asserting that “art is a form of consciousness,” and frames the essential role of art as a vehicle of communication and empathy:


 by Maria Popova

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Reading Selections in the Empathy Study

Reading Selections in the Empathy Study | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

The reading materials used in one or more of experiments in a study on empathy by David Comer Kidd and Emanuele Castano, published in Science

 

A study published in the journal Science found that after reading literary fiction, as opposed to popular fiction or serious nonfiction, people performed better on tests measuring empathy, social perception and emotional intelligence — skills that come in especially handy when you are trying to read someone’s body language or gauge what they might be thinking. These were the reading selections used in one or more of the experiments in the study.

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Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds

Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

New research shows works by writers such as Charles Dickens and Téa Obreht sharpen our ability to understand others' emotions – more than thrillers or romance novels, writes Liz Bury

 

Have you ever felt that reading a good book makes you better able to connect with your fellow human beings? If so, the results of a new scientific study back you up, but only if your reading material is literaryfiction – pulp fiction or non-fiction will not do.

 

Psychologists David Comer Kidd and Emanuele Castano, at the New School for Social Research in New York, have proved that reading literary fiction enhances the ability to detect and understand other people's emotions, a crucial skill in navigating complex social relationships.

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Claire Williams's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:46 PM

This article from the gaurdien, states that reading fiction helps a persons empathy. Even though this article does not nessicarily help a readers reading I found it interesting that reading fiction can help a person feel empathy.

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Using the Arts to Build Empathy, the Ultimate 21st Century Skill

Using the Arts to Build Empathy, the Ultimate 21st Century Skill | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
By allowing our students to be both creators and thoughtful perceivers of art, we help each student develop her/his capacity to empathize.

 

What will the world look like when our students leave school?  While we educators may not know exactly, we can see the direction the world is taking and can make an educated guess as to what our students will need to be able to do; hence the creation of the 21st Century Skills.  When I look at those skills like collaboration, cooperation, communication, problem-solving, and creativity what I see is empathy.  Without empathy any one of those skills would be nearly, if not entirely, impossible to attain.  And what has a great capacity to help people develop empathy?  You guessed it – the arts! 

Deirdre Moore 

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Building the capacity for empathy - Home

Building the capacity for empathy - Home | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

The unsung hero of success is empathy. Understanding the needs and desires of others is critical for leaders, salesmen, politicians, lotharios, preachers, CEOs, writers, teachers, consultants ... well, just about everybody. The better one understands others, the more effective one can meet their needs, appeal to their self-interests or, I suppose, manipulate them. And with a global economy, our empathy needs to extend beyond  understanding just our next door neighbor.

 

The question is then - can empathy be learned - and how? Is there a small muscle somewhere in the mind or soul that can be exercised, stretched, and built that allows us to more fully place ourselves in others' shoes?

 

Reading fiction - especially when the setting is another culture, another time - has to be the best means of building empathic sensibilities

 

 Doug Johnson

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On empathy through theater: Julia Lennon at TEDxGreensFarmsAcademy

Julia Lennon is a passionate performer. Her love of music and theater has offered exciting opportunities for Julia throughout her life, and has, in many ways, defined who she is today. Julia leads both the women's a Capella group and the improvisational troupe at Greens Farms Academy (GFA), and will be playing Florence in the spring production of Chess. She was the chief orchestrator behind the Concert for the Green and White in January, which donated over $40,000 to Sandy Hook Elementary
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Building an other-minded society: Musical interaction cultivates empathy in children

Building an other-minded society: Musical interaction cultivates empathy in children | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

New research suggests that understanding the emotional state of others is something that can be learned and practiced.

 

Schools could one day add “empathy education” to their curriculum. New research suggests that understanding the emotional state of others is something that can be learned and practiced.

 

According to a study published in the July issue of Psychology of Music, playing musical games can help cultivate a sense of empathy in children.

Eric W. Dolan 

 

Culture of Empathy Builder Page: Tal-Chen Rabinowitch
http://bit.ly/KQZRY5

 

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