Empathy
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Emotional Intelligence - YouTube

A short animation breaking down the concepts of emotional intelligence and how it's an integral part of thinking and decision making. For more of my work vis...
Krissie Vater Wilk's insight:

When you make a bad decision, it's likely that your emotions and logic are out of balance.  Rational thinking is a combination of both emotions and logic.

 

Emotions prioritize our thinking.

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Shut Up and Listen

Shut Up and Listen | Empathy | Scoop.it
Understanding the cold, hard truths behind a catchy phrase (Therapy can teach empathy: Affective empathy requires being good at listening to yourself http://t.co/nHs0nNREfR

Via Chris Brown
Krissie Vater Wilk's insight:

When people are in an argument or in a defensive mindset, their listening decreased.  They may only be listening for weaknesses or ways to provoke the other person.  They are listening to respond versus listening to understand the other person.

 

It's easier to improve cognitive empathy skills by using pictures of people with different facial expressions and asking the person to identify the emotion.

 

It's more complex to improve affective empathy.  Affective empathy requires being aware of my own feelings and then recognizing how my feelings are resonating with the other person's feelings.  It's feeling with someone.

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Chris Brown's curator insight, August 6, 2014 11:07 AM

This is a longer article that discusses some interesting aspects of emotional intelligence and the importance of listening to one's self and others.

 

In the article the writer, Andrew Price, points out that "... if there’s one thing we can learn from all the chatter, it’s that talking about empathy isn’t enough—learning to listen is the hard part."

 

One of the most insightful parts of this article is the discussion of affective empathy.  Price states:

... the irony of affective empathy is that it requires being really good at listening to one’s self. A person has to be able to identify his or her own feelings to notice how they’re resonating with someone else’s.

 

Do you have a technique to help you exercise affective empathy?

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Three Ways Leaders Can Listen with More Empathy

Three Ways Leaders Can Listen with More Empathy | Empathy | Scoop.it

Study after study has shown that listening is critical to leadership effectiveness. So, why are so few leaders good at it?
 

Too often, leaders seek to take command,
direct conversations, talk too much, or worry
about what they will say next in defense
or rebuttal.  

 

The ability and willingness to listen with empathy is often what sets a leader apart.  Hearing words is not adequate; the leader truly needs to work at understanding the position and perspective of the others involved in the conversation. 

 

In a recent interview, Paul Bennett, Chief Creative Officer at IDEO, advises leaders to listen more and ask the right question.  Bennett shared that “for most of my twenties I assumed that the world was more interested in me than I was in it, so I spent most of my time talking, usually in a quite uninformed way, about whatever I thought, rushing to be clever, thinking about what I was going to say to someone rather than listening to what they were saying to me.”

 

by John Coleman


Via Edwin Rutsch, Chris Brown
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Chris Brown's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:38 PM

A nice article that discusses three behaviors in empathic listening.  Each of these are areas that we should focus on to improve our connection through communications. 

Recognize verbal and non-verbal cues.

Process what you hear/see

Respond thoughtfully

Be sure to link to the article for more in depth information.  Well worth the time to read.   

donhornsby's curator insight, July 16, 2014 6:12 PM

(From the article): Overall, it is important for leaders to recognize the multidimensionality of empathetic listening and engage in all forms of behaviors.  Among its benefits, empathic listening builds trust and respect, enables people to reveal their emotions–including tensions, facilitates openness of information sharing, and creates an environment that encourages collaborative problem-solving.

Deborah Orlowski, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 17, 2014 12:11 PM

Coleman suggests 3 simple ways anyone can be a more effective listener. They seem self-evident but I wonder how often we actually do them? Why not try them for yourself.  If you think you're already practicing them, check yourself to make sure you really are, not just thinking you are! 

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Bill Gates and Bill Drayton Make the Case for Empathy

Bill Gates and Bill Drayton Make the Case for Empathy | Empathy | Scoop.it
It might have been pure coincidence, but last month, Bill Drayton, speaking at Toronto's MaRS Discovery District and Bill Gates at Stanford University in California, made separate cases for why empathy is so important to the social change movement.

 

Before I zoom in on the specifics of what Drayton and Gates said, here’s a bit of background. The term ethical empathy has its roots in philosophy, the premise being that without the capacity for empathy, individuals may inadvertently harm others. In the healthcare field, the concept has been utilized in the training of physicians for some time, the focus being on developing doctors with a high capacity for empathy, ensuring they put themselves in their patients’ shoes when making critical health decisions and ultimately providing the best care possible. 

 

by Verity Dimock


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Chris Brown's curator insight, July 25, 2014 11:35 AM

In a recent speech to the graduates of Stanford University, Bill Gates made this observation:

 

"Optimism can fuel innovation and lead to new tools to eliminate suffering," he said. "But if you never really see the people who are suffering, your optimism can’t help.”

 

This article uses this speech as a point of reference to discuss the need for empathy in business today. 

 

The author discusses an intriguing way to measure empathy in the interactions between doctors and patients.  This scale may prove useful in business as a whole.  Periodically through the day, stop to contemplate where your interactions fall on the "empathy scale" below.

 

0 - responses were a rote compliance simply based on rules

1 - responses had the tone of treating them as a friend

2 - responses were couched in treating others the way I would like to be treated

3 - reponses were based on the other's perspective with consideration of them as a whole person and their current situation

 

Now, shoot for a level 3!

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Leadership Is About Emotion

Leadership Is About Emotion | Empathy | Scoop.it
Make a list of the 5 leaders you most admire. They can be from business, social media, politics, technology, the sciences, any field. Now ask yourself why you admire them. The chances are high that your admiration is based on more than their accomplishments, impressive as those may be. I’ll bet [...]

Via Chris Brown
Krissie Vater Wilk's insight:

Great leaders understand empathy.  When you empathize with another person, you create a connection with them.

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Chris Brown's curator insight, September 2, 2014 10:42 AM

Great leaders allow talent to shine.  Here, there are brief looks at some tools to use as leaders.  Some of these are recurring themes, which we continually should work on.  As you read the article, consider which might provide a good opportunity for your growth.


Emotional intelligence, continuous learning, providing context, letting go, being honest, kind, respectful.  Collaboration, partnering with your people, 


Leadership is both an art and a science. These tools are guidelines, not rigid rules. Everyone has to develop his or her own individual leadership style. Make these tools a part of your arsenal and use them well as you strive to reach people on an emotional level. 

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» The Relationship Building Power of Empathy: Seven Actions of Empathic Listeners, 3 of 3 - Neuroscience and Relationships

» The Relationship Building Power of Empathy: Seven Actions of Empathic Listeners, 3 of 3 - Neuroscience and Relationships | Empathy | Scoop.it
Relationships: The Relationship Building Power of Empathy: Seven Actions of Empathic Listeners, 3 of 3 http://t.co/ZiuuYGYud8

Via Chris Brown
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Chris Brown's curator insight, March 31, 2014 3:11 PM

Intresting article that gives some actions of an empathic listener.  Number six is particularly challenging...to "Shift away from judgements and instead make consious observations."  This means must focus off of self and on to understanding the other person.

Choose an action and practice it.

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Handling Underperformers – Turn Your Poorest Performers into Superstars - Leaders Edge Inc.

Handling Underperformers – Turn Your Poorest Performers into Superstars - Leaders Edge Inc. | Empathy | Scoop.it
Handling underperformers isn't easy, but if you do it well, you can turn your most troubled employees into superstars. Find out how to get started.

Via Chris Brown
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Chris Brown's curator insight, July 25, 2014 12:14 PM

How do you interact with underperformers?  This article by Joanne Trotta discusses that fact that handling underperformers is one of the most important responsibilities of a leader of people.  She provides a shortlist of common reasons employees might not be working up to their potential.  Fears & insecurities, Confirmation biases, Negative workplace culture…note that none of these are centered on the inability or lack of skills needed to perform.

She goes on to say that :

“…until I showed some empathy and put myself in that person’s shoes – I couldn’t really have a breakthrough with that individual because trust was missing.”

Focus on tapping into your empathy.  Once you can connect with your people by showing empathy and vulnerability, you can turn weaknesses into strengths.