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Restorative Justice provides a context to increase empathy. | Restorative Justice and Circles

Restorative Justice provides a context to increase empathy. | Restorative Justice and Circles | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Empathy. A crucial emotional response to those around us. We are hard-wired to connect with others. From the book Born for Love which is about the:

 

empathy that allows us to make social connections, and the power of human relationships to both heal and harm.

 

I had a nice conversation with a man who serves youth. He was once “at-risk”, and we had a good conversation about Restorative Justice approaches. This man explained the importance of context for empathy. This man grew up in poverty, he never knew about home ownership, it was not part of his growing up. As a man, he now owns a home. He explained how he understands “foreclosure” now, but as a teen he had no context for that. I agreed about the context for empathy, but I continued to think about it.

 

Kris Miner
http://circle-space.org/about/
St. Croix Valley Restorative Justice 

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Empathy and Justice
International News about Empathy applied to Conflict, Justice, Restorative Justice, Mediation and the Law. (more at CultureOfEmpathy.com)”
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Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page

Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

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4 Steps To Conflict Resolution When You And He Are Both Right: "Enter empathy'

4 Steps To Conflict Resolution When You And He Are Both Right: "Enter empathy' | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Enter empathy. That is, achieving the insight to understand why the other one feels wronged; stepping into the other’s reasoning; creating a bridge on which to move.

 

This is hard for adults to do in the throes of anger and resentment. It’s impossible for young children in their disputes because they lack the maturity and experience to cultivate empathy. (Parents can cultivate empathy; perhaps give a child responsibility for feeding and walking a pet to build concern for another’s needs.)...

 

So, how should the couple disputing play-offs versus family obligation proceed?

 

  1. Let go of who is right. That’s because both are. Their feelings are truthful.
  2. Start moving across the empathy bridge by accepting that truth. He feels he deserves to do what he wants on Sunday plus he remembers watching the games with his father every Sunday plus seeing the play-offs is a matter of urgency—no matter to her that all that running around after a ball is ridiculous. She feels guilt from a history of rebelling against her parents plus she rarely visits them in Florida while her sister does it routinely plus her mother loves making pot roast for family which she calls her signature dish—no matter to him she should grow up already.

  3. Now that they are traversing the empathy bridge they make an honest effort at listening; past truths they never knew about may even emerge to change an argument to enlightenment....

 

Judith Peck is professor emerita of art, Ramapo College of New Jersey in Mahwah.

 

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Enough with naming and shaming: It’s time for restorative justice in Hollywood.

Enough with naming and shaming: It’s time for restorative justice in Hollywood. | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
With her proximity to Hollywood, Ackerman is well situated to become the Gloria Allred of restorative justice. And, if its most vaunted ideals are to be believed, Hollywood should be an ideal platform to model a practice based on storytelling and deep listening.

 

When filmmakers talk about their craft, they often say the things they prize most highly as artists are authenticity, empathy and narrative truth. Now is the time to marshal those values in service to real, off-screen catharsis.

 

 

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Empathy: The Heart of Difficult Conversations | Michelle Stowe | TEDxTallaght  

Michelle Stowe is a restorative practitioner, trainer and consultant. She is passionate about creating well-being and happiness in the workplace; and particularly interested in re-culturing schools and cultivating a restorative paradigm shift that honours community and connection.

 

Michelle also works with schools, communities and organisations that need support in resolving conflict between people. She is particularly interested in supporting others to turn towards and see themselves in one another in times of conflict. Being involved in this work allows her to feel that the life she is living is the same as the life that wants to live in her. Michelle Stowe is a restorative practitioner, trainer and consultant. She is passionate about creating well-being and happiness in the workplace; and particularly interested in re-culturing schools and cultivating a restorative paradigm shift that honours community and connection.

 

Michelle also works with schools, communities and organisations that need support in resolving conflict between people. She is particularly interested in supporting others to turn towards and see themselves in one another in times of conflict. Being involved in this work allows her to feel that the life she is living is the same as the life that wants to live in her. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

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Justice Requires Empathy

Justice Requires Empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Before we can change our system for the better, we have to understand its shortcomings.  As a result, on this site you will see postings about the many injustices and inequities within our criminal justice system.  In particular, there will be postings on police abuse of power as well as institutional injustices.  You will  find articles that suggest alternatives and explore other, usually collaborative, systems of conflict resolution. 

 

  You will  find articles that suggest alternatives and explore other, usually collaborative, systems of conflict resolution.  You will also find exposés on the pros of cons of our current system as well as those of an empathy-based and collaborative system.

 

With empathy as our guide, we will explore ideas and ways to progress toward a justice system  

 

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(Empathic Policing) De-Escalation Training: Learning to Back Off

(Empathic Policing) De-Escalation Training: Learning to Back Off | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
De-escalation training is not new nor innovative. The philosophy behind the training is that officers need to take every opportunity to slow down a situation when possible.

 

Which begs the question of just what is de-escalation. And as with many things, the definition depends on who you ask. One writer recently defined it as: "The art of defusing a tense situation with a word or gesture instead of being confrontational or reaching for a weapon." Obviously that writer got the definition from someone who believes in magic.

 

Veteran street officers and trainers would tell you de-escalation is the result of a combination of communication, empathy, instinct, and sound officer safety tactics. And its goal is to help the officer achieve a good outcome where neither the officer nor the subject is injured. They would stress that not every subject is willing to play along and officers have to be ready to use force, even deadly force, if necessary.

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Empathy Conflict Coaching for 15 Congress Members

Empathy Conflict Coaching for 15 Congress Members | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
We will coach Congressmembers in empathy-based strategy to mediate powerful solutions to political stalemate and discord. Through networking & innovative outreach approaches like personalized briefings & role-play demos, we will build relationships with Congressmembers where (in small groups/one-on-one) they revise political strategy, relationships, & communication by identifying the core shared human needs UNDERLYING parties' positions/actions, & facilitating solutions that work for EVERYONE.
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Empathy Neuroscience Conference -  Rome, Italy

Empathy Neuroscience Conference -  Rome, Italy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Empathy Neuroscience: Translational Relevance to Conflict Transformation
October 18-19, 2017
Rome, Italy

This conference brings together empathy neuroscience research to tackle a key translational challenge: its relevance for conflict transformation. It focuses on the idea that taking the other person’s perspective is ultimately necessary to resolve conflict; and that conflicts are perpetuated by adopting a single perspective. The conference considers the relevance of empathy neuroscience for policy makers working in conflict transformation.

 

The meeting will bring together an international panel of speakers drawn from outstanding scientists, clinicians, scholars, and charities, focusing particularly on the potential role of empathy in the Israel-Palestine conflict. The aim is to enable dialogue and a better understanding of empathy, and to promote the development of evidence-based interventions that foster empathy in conflict zones.


 

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 “Strategic Empathy as a Tool of Statecraft”

 “Strategic Empathy as a Tool of Statecraft” | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Contents==========

Introduction.
Empathy Defined .
Strategic Empathy as a Tool of Statecraft
International Relations Theory and Empathy
The Opening of China
American Policy in the Iraq War
Conclusion
Bibliography.

 

 by John Dale Grover October 2016

 

 

Empathy isn’t normally the first word that comes to mind when scholars write or talk about foreign policy, security, or grand strategy. In fact, if the word empathy was used in the same sentence as the phrases “foreign policy”, “security”, or “grand strategy”, one might be forgiven for assuming that the person using that word was either embarrassingly naïve or hopelessly radical.

 

After all, empathy is a term that often carries with it emotionally warm or idealistic connotations that can also seem to include a desire to actively emotionally sympathize with or even aid whomever empathy is being practiced on. Such connotations and altruism do not readily make empathy a useful paradigm in foreign policy.

 

It is well known that most foreign policy literature normally does not even consider empathy or else actively is hostile to the idea as being against the brutal realities of human nature or as dangerous to the national interest. Indeed, the only exceptions seem to be in the fields of international development, human rights and relief work, or conflict resolution and peace studies.

 

 

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Relational-Cultural Theory: Fostering Healthy Coexistence Through a Relational Lens | Beyond Intractability

Relational-Cultural Theory: Fostering Healthy Coexistence Through a Relational Lens | Beyond Intractability | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Mutual Empathy

Mutual empathy is described as an "openness to being affected by and affecting another person."[15] This relational process involves both emotional and rational aspects. The element of respect is seen to play a critical role in fostering mutual empathy. The four major components of empathy include:

  • The capacity for emotional response
  • The mental capacity to take the perspective of the other
  • The ability to regulate emotions
  • The level of awareness of self and others[


Relational theorists emphasize the need for understanding that, just as disconnection is inevitable in relationships, experiencing empathic failure is unavoidable. Empathic failure, however, can lead to great reconnection if awareness, trust, and authenticity are present. [17]

 

Having empathic understanding does not imply only having positive emotions, but rather committing to a fuller understanding of one's own and another's experience.[18] The other is seen as a dynamic, whole being, rather than defined by a single attribute or action.

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Hard Feelings: Empathy in Engaging Armed Groups | Center for Empathy in International Affairs

Hard Feelings: Empathy in Engaging Armed Groups | Center for Empathy in International Affairs | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Constructive dialogue with non-state armed groups is hugely important – to prevent, mitigate or resolve violent conflict. But it is equally challenging and variable in terms of the context, actors involved, purpose of such dialogue, and the means by which it is achieved.

 

On 15 March 2017, Conciliation Resources and the Center for Empathy in International Affairs hosted a roundtable discussion involving 21 mediators, peacebuilders and experts to consider the role that empathy can play in helping to establish and sustain dialogue with non-state armed groups.

Our new briefing paper, Hard Feelings, published jointly with Conciliation Resources, summarises key insights from that discussion.

Roundtable participants included individuals from or affiliated with a range of institutions, including Conciliation Resources, the Center for Empathy in International Affairs, Chatham House, Concordis International, the Rift Valley Institute, Saferworld, the University of Kent, the University of Edinburgh, and the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office. To read the full briefing paper click here.

 http://www.centerforempathy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CEIA-CR-Hard-Feelings.pdf

 

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(Empathic Policing) Can Empathy Improve Policing? 

(Empathic Policing) Can Empathy Improve Policing?  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Overall crime rates are down in the United States. But looking the news, it’s hard to not despair. Police killings of unarmed black citizens makes us question the integrity of our police forces, while retribution killings of innocent police officers make us fear for their safety on the job. According to a recent Gallop poll, confidence in the police has dropped to its lowest level in 22 years.

Yet, there is some hope. Social scientists have begun joining forces with police to look at how police communication protocols and training can be changed to help increase community trust for the police and reduce the use of force—and help them work together to fight crime.

While the research is largely preliminary, some of the findings suggest that empathy—being able to see interactions from another’s perspective and understand the emotions involved—may play an important role in policing

 

.By Jill Suttie

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Read President Obama's Speech From the Dallas Memorial Service: with an open heart, we can learn to stand in each other’s shoes and look at the world through each other’s eyes.

Read President Obama's Speech From the Dallas Memorial Service: with an open heart, we can learn to stand in each other’s shoes and look at the world through each other’s eyes. | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
But then I am reminded of what the Lord tells Ezekiel. “I will give you a new heart,” the Lord says, “and put a new spirit in you. I will remove from you your heart of stone, and give you a heart of flesh.”


That’s what we must pray for, each of us. A new heart. Not a heart of stone, but a heart open to the fears and hopes and challenges of our fellow citizens.


That’s what we’ve seen in Dallas these past few days, and that’s what we must sustain. Because with an open heart, we can learn to stand in each other’s shoes and look at the world through each other’s eyes.

 

So that maybe the police officer sees his own son in that teenager with a hoodie, who’s kind of goofing off but not dangerous.

 

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AMU Criminal Justice Student Creates Documentary to Change Police Empathy

AMU Criminal Justice Student Creates Documentary to Change Police Empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Now that the film is done, Brownfeld looks forward to the “effect” phase. He says his goal is to find ways the film can help improve police and community relationships.

He is also working to develop training materials in parallel with the film as a tool to help officers explore the role of empathy in police work.

“I am proud of my time as a police officer, and I want to do what I can to contribute to the profession of policing and to help law enforcement in our country be the best version of itself that it can be,” he said.
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How to escape the Drama Triangle 

How to escape the Drama Triangle  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
The corners of the Drama Triangle
The Drama Triangle is a concept that defines the three roles people typically take on in high-conflict situations. Contrary to its name, the triangle doesn’t have to involve three people; it simply follows how different personalities affect each other during a conflict:

    The Victim – When problems arise, the victim tends to look helplessly inward. They spin a small anxiety (like, say, not answering a boss’s email on the weekend) into an outsized disaster (“I’m definitely getting fired!”). Hello Drama Queen!


    The Rescuer – The rescuer is the classic enabler who swoops in to save the day. He or she can be relied upon to always a put out a fire or show up at the last minute. Well-meaning to a fault, this “fixer” behavior can lead to resentment and burnout. Reluctant Confronters by nature, rescuers don’t speak up even when wronged.


    The Persecutor – We all know the persecutor. The go-to strategies are often controlling, blaming, and criticizing. In arguments, he or she will put you down and try to shame you into forgiveness. The persecutor’s refrain? “It’s all your fault.”

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Two Dimensional Empathy in Mediation is a must.

Two Dimensional Empathy in Mediation is a must. | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Place of empathy in mediation is pivotal. As discussed in the above paragraph, it is the mediator who runs the process; it is his responsibility to be an empathetic person. In mediation, concept of empathy is twofold i.e. empathy towards the parties and empathy in the parties inter se. I would like to discuss both these dimensions separately.

Empathy towards the parties is a necessity in mediation. A mediator has to ensure the parties that I understand you pain. Our role to mediate is that of negotiator. We have to build communication with the parties firstly and then between the parties. Mediation is the negotiation between the parties with help of mediator in joint or separate meetings. We can win the confidence of the parties easily if we prove to them that we understand what their pain is and what its quantum is.

Empathy is to be exercised in separate meeting/caucus and never in a joint meeting as during the joint meeting one party may feel that mediator is taking side of the other. 

 

 Yasir Hafeez Awan

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Empathy and social justice | Justice Requires Empathy: Empathy: Tap It or Teach It, but Definitely Integrate It

Empathy and social justice | Justice Requires Empathy: Empathy: Tap It or Teach It, but Definitely Integrate It | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Empathy is poised to become the buzzword of the 21st century– the defining trait of our social and political evolution.  Empathy will be to this century what “rights” was to the 20th century and “equality” was to the 19th century. 

As a word, a concept, and a goal empathy is omnipresent.  From parenting newborns to teaching college students, to training doctors and employees of profit-driven ventures, to effecting radical political and social change, empathy is becoming the prevailing philosophy. 
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Carol Gilligan - Ethics of care

Carol Gilligan - Ethics of care | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

9. What are important issues for the ethics of care in the future?
To address the question of why the ethics of care is still embattled (especially in the U.S.) but also now in Europe), to consider the ethics of care in light of new evidence in the human sciences that as humans we are by nature empathic and responsive beings, hard-wired for cooperation.

Rather than asking how do we gain the capacity to care, the questions become how do we come not to care; how do we lose the capacity for empathy and mutual understanding?

 

It is also crucial to clarify that within a patriarchal framework, the ethics of care is a “feminine” ethic, whereas within a democratic framework it is a human ethic, grounded in core democratic values: the importance of everyone having a voice and being listened to carefully and heard with respect. The premise of equal voice then allows conflicts to be addressed in relationships. Different voices then become integral to the vitality of a democratic society.

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‘Suspensions don’t really teach anything’: Alberta schools look to restorative justice as alternative

‘Suspensions don’t really teach anything’: Alberta schools look to restorative justice as alternative | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

By Carolyn Kury de Castillo

Teachers learned more about restorative justice at a conference in Calgary this weekend. More schools are looking toward using restorative justice circles as an alternative to punishments like suspensions and expulsions.

The practice gives each child a voice which creates trusting relationships and fosters empathy, she said.

 

“It’s about feeling closer to everyone in the classroom because one of the principles of restorative practice is that you are building empathy and compassion for other people. Because when you
get to know somebody’s story then you can’t act towards them in a negative manner,” Plamondon said.

 

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Video: (Empathic Policing) Richmond police chief: 'That's really what community policing should be about.'

Video: (Empathic Policing) Richmond police chief: 'That's really what community policing should be about.' | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

The term “community policing” has become such a buzz phrase that “Pretty much every department, if you ask them, would say they're doing community policing,” says Magnus,


“And I think most believe it. But the challenge is: is community policing really policing the community in the way that the community wants to be policed, or is it driven by the police department?”


Magnus' approach has been to build partnerships with the community at every opportunity, learning from the residents what their priorities are, in order to define where resources should go.


by Brad Marshland

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Conflict Frontiers Seminar: MOOS: "The New Paradigm" | Beyond Intractability

Conflict Frontiers Seminar: MOOS: "The New Paradigm" | Beyond Intractability | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Conflict Frontiers Seminar: MOOS:

http://www.beyondintractability.org/moos/frontiers-seminar

 


What does Hauss mean by long-term problem-solving? Well, it includes at least three things, empathy, reciprocity and trust. And each of those builds upon each other. So the more of one you have, the more the other that you can have. He adds that empathy is brought about by listening.

 

So instead of pushing “the other” out, you try to bring “the other” in by listening to them, developing empathy for them, understanding for their interests and needs.
 

That enables you to work together with them reciprocally to try to develop approaches that are best for everybody. And that helps develops trust. How do you do this? Well, one of the ways that you could do it is, look for what Hauss calls “positive deviance,” “bright spots” where people of either accidentally or on purpose have done something helpful to address the conflict or the wicked problem.  Then you try to magnify those actions that have been helpful, replicate those actions, and help them grow into what he calls “virtuous cycles.”..

 

Instead of having things escalate so that tensions are getting higher and higher and problems are getting worse and worse, you build “virtuous circles,” where you solve a little bit, and that helps you solve more, and you build trust, and that helps you build relationships, that helps you build them empathy, and so on.

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Empathic Listening and Emotions | Beyond Intractability

Empathic Listening and Emotions | Beyond Intractability | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Do you want to talk any more about empathy? I know that it is a topic that has concerned you considerably in the past.

Answer:

Well, it hasn't concerned me, but it's been paramount because my view is what we wrote in our textbook, what we found, what we learned, what we know is how you listen and the ability to listen is extremely important. That means listening, not only to obtain information, but with empathy. To reflect back to the other party is critical. It's critical in dealing with any emotional situation and virtually every civil rights conflict we entered a strong emotional component: anger, rage, disappointment, hurt, fear.

 

 

To be able to listen with empathy, reflecting back to the party that you understand what they are saying and how they feel about it, not being critical, suspending judgment, not interrupting and those types of behaviors, all learnable skills, are absolutely critical to be consistently effective in this work. I remember John Chase telling me, when he was the regional director in Philadelphia, of a public housing case where the tenants were protesting over the construction of a highway through their neighborhood....

 

 Empathic listening is the most important skill a mediator brings to this work.

 

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Chip Hauss's Security 2.0 and "The New Paradigm" | Beyond Intractability

Chip Hauss's Security 2.0 and "The New Paradigm" | Beyond Intractability | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

What does Hauss mean by long-term problem-solving? Well, it includes at least three things, empathy, reciprocity and trust. And each of those builds upon each other. So the more of one you have, the more the other that you can have. He adds that empathy is brought about by listening.

 

So instead of pushing “the other” out, you try to bring “the other” in by listening to them, developing empathy for them, understanding for their interests and needs.

 

That enables you to work together with them reciprocally to try to develop approaches that are best for everybody. And that helps develops trust. How do you do this? Well, one of the ways that you could do it is, look for what Hauss calls “positive deviance,” “bright spots” where people of either accidentally or on purpose have done something helpful to address the conflict or the wicked problem.  Then you try to magnify those actions that have been helpful, replicate those actions, and help them grow into what he calls “virtuous cycles.”..

 

Instead of having things escalate so that tensions are getting higher and higher and problems are getting worse and worse, you build “virtuous circles,” where you solve a little bit, and that helps you solve more, and you build trust, and that helps you build relationships, that helps you build them empathy, and so on.

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Empathy Is the Key to Conflict Resolution or Management

Empathy Is the Key to Conflict Resolution or Management | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Empathy has been found to undermine biased conflict perceptions.

Everyone interprets things through their own lenses, which filter information based upon our personal biases, beliefs, assumptions and values.

Conflict is a fact of life and occurs for a variety of reasons, such as differing perspectives, priorities or solutions to a problem. Many believe that "misunderstanding is the cause of 90% of all conflict." Irrespective of the actual percentage, a great deal of conflict does stem from misunderstandings.

 

Empathy and Relationships

 

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Nigerian Institute of Chartered Arbitrators's curator insight, March 30, 2017 4:49 AM
Empathy Is the Key to Conflict Resolution or Management
Nigerian Institute of Chartered Arbitrators's curator insight, May 19, 2017 12:47 PM

Empathy Is the Key to Conflict Resolution or Management

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Support Empathy Dialogue Circles with Police, Black Lives Matter and Community.

Support Empathy Dialogue Circles with Police, Black Lives Matter and Community. | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

How might we improve police and community relations?

 

This is a project to organize and host a series of Empathy Circles with Police Officers, Black Lives Matter and other Community Members. The best way for communities to come together is foster mutual and relational empathic dialog and understanding that results in shared action.  We can start with a series of online Empathy Circles and then move towards hosting local community circles in larger groups.

 

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Former president George W. Bush honored the slain Dallas officers with a message of unity and empathy

Former president George W. Bush honored the slain Dallas officers with a message of unity and empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

And this has strained our bonds of understanding and common purpose. But Americans have a great advantage. To renew our unity, we only need to remember our values. We have never been held together by blood or background. We are bound by things as the spirit, by shared commitments to common ideals.

At our best we practice empathy, imagining ourselves in the lives and circumstances of others. This is the bridge across our nation’s deepest divisions. And it’s not nearly a matter of tolerance. But of learning of the struggles and stories of our fellow citizens and finding our better selves in the process

 

 

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