Empathy and HealthCare
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Empathy and HealthCare
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Physician Healthcare: Thoughts on Empathy Under the Northern Lights : AAFP Leader Voices

Physician Healthcare: Thoughts on Empathy Under the Northern Lights : AAFP Leader Voices | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

I use empathy as a diagnostic tool. My mind is geared to understand and mirror the emotions of others. Although I use logic and evidence-based medicine, I cannot deny that a large part of my assessment in the exam room is based on my reaction to how the patient feels.

 

Our brains are uniquely wired for precisely this process and the trillions of neural connections along with experience trigger patterns of diagnosis. The way a patient moves onto the exam table, the small facial expressions, eye contact, skin color and the way the heart beats mean as much to me as do the history and lab work. I use all of this information to answer the fundamental question: Is this patient sick or not?

 

John Cullen, M.D., is a member of the AAFP Board of Directors.

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Doctor's empathy boosts patient satisfaction

Doctor's empathy boosts patient satisfaction | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Empathetic doctors seem to understand what their patient is going through, which contributes to patient satisfaction. 

 

Patients do better and are more satisfied with their care if they believe their doctor is empathetic, a new study suggests.

Researchers asked 112 patients, average age 51, to rate their dealings with their hand surgeon.  The results showed that doctor empathy accounted for 65 percent of patient satisfaction.

Patient satisfaction wasn't influenced by wait time for an appointment or wait time in the office, time spent with the surgeon, resident/fellow involvement, whether or not patients were seeking a second opinion, patients' health knowledge or type of treatment. 

 

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Last Lecture: Empathy can't cure, but it can alleviate suffering on both sides of the stethoscope: Indiana University–Purdue University

Last Lecture: Empathy can't cure, but it can alleviate suffering on both sides of the stethoscope: Indiana University–Purdue University | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

His interest in empathic communication "took an unexpected turn in 1979, when I lost my mother suddenly due to a preventable communication error involving the delivery of diagnostic information by her physician," Frankel said.

 

"It was devastating, and it transformed my interest in communication theory to one of urgent practical importance. Since that time, my motivation and commitment to improving communication between physicians and patients have been deeply personal as well as scholarly."

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Study: General Practitioners’ Empathy and Health Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study of Consultations in Areas of High and Low Deprivation

Study: General Practitioners’ Empathy and Health Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study of Consultations in Areas of High and Low Deprivation | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Stewart W. Mercer , and colleagues

What This Study Found

Compared with affluent areas, patients in deprived areas have higher rates of ill health, psychosocial problems, and multimorbidity; more problems to discuss within the same visit time yet less desire for shared decision making; perceive their GPs as less empathetic; and have worse outcomes at one month.

 

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Study: Physician empathy a key driver of patient satisfaction

Study: Physician empathy a key driver of patient satisfaction | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

A study presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), links patient-perceived physician empathy with improved outcomes and medical care satisfaction.


In the study, 112 new patients (mean age 51) at the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery rated personal interaction with their hand surgeon. In addition, patients completed a health literacy test, provided sociodemographic information, and answered questions about pain, upper extremity function and depression.


Sixty-five percent of patient satisfaction was attributed to physician empathy, according to the study. Satisfaction was not affected by wait time for an appointment, wait time in the office, time with the surgeon, resident/fellow involvement, whether or not patients were seeking a second opinion, health literacy, or treatment choice.


Study Abstract


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Simulation-Based Empathetic Communication Curriculum

Simulation-Based Empathetic Communication Curriculum | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

This is a 1.5-hour empathy curriculum designed for four to five resident participants at a time and includes a simulation scenario followed by a debriefing session, a didactic session, and a role-playing exercise.


The residents are the patient in a simulated scenario where they experience preparations to undergo an urgent cesarean delivery. The simulation experience includes being rushed to the operating room (OR) by an obstetrician and anesthesiologist, the consent process, undergoing a medical history and physical exam, responding to questions and commands imposed by the health care team, hemodynamic monitor application, preparatory OR work, and witnessing emergency team dynamics



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Empathy: The Key to Reaching Clients Affected by Overweight and Obesity

Empathy: The Key to Reaching Clients Affected by Overweight and Obesity | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
This scenario is also familiar to much of the medical community. In fact, the highly respected Massachusetts General Hospital has launched a training program engineered to teach doctors empathy. This is not a program designed to simply improve “bedside manner,” but, rather, to teach the skill of empathy.

Now, why would physicians, with their wealth of medical knowledge and skill (and very limited time) invest in learning empathy? Because they know that improved disease management and surgery outcomes depend on adherence and that recent studies have revealed that empathy improves adherence results significantly (Di Blasi et al., 2001; Halpern 2001; Stewart 1995; Gerteis et al., 1993).

So, why is empathy important to health and fitness professionals? As Dr. Cedric Bryant, Chief Science Officer at ACE, explains, “Healthcare is the ultimate team sport.” As physicians increasingly recognize the skill of empathy as the key to adherence, they will be more confident in working with health and fitness professionals who demonstrate and share their view of the skill of empathy.
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Should We Train Doctors for Empathy?

Should We Train Doctors for Empathy? | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Following a wave of research suggesting the benefits of emotionally attuned physicians, the medical field is exploring ways to cultivate empathy.


In light of the research, Kirch wants to produce more doctors who show care and sensitivity toward their patients. To this end, one of the steps he and the AAMC are taking is to screen for them: They have revised the MCAT, the admission test for medical school, so that the test now includes a new section measuring student knowledge on the behavioral, social, and psychological elements of health care—a way to gauge applicants’ understanding of how a patient’s background, psychology, and experience impacts their health. Kirch sees this change as important for the development of empathic, effective healers.


By Jill Suttie | July 8, 2015 

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Why Kindness Heals: empathy for a patient -- listening, connecting, and validating them

Why Kindness Heals: empathy for a patient -- listening, connecting, and validating them | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
While some clinicians don't appreciate this reality, research has demonstrated that when a physician or nurse shows empathy for a patient -- listening, connecting, and validating them -- the patient is more likely to recover faster across a wide variety of medical conditions to even include surgery.


One study has demonstrated that an empathetic interaction with a physician can have as much of a positive impact on one's risk of heart attack as taking an aspirin a day.

James R. Doty, M.D.

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Dogs are experts at reading human EMOTIONS: how dogs seem able to show empathy.

Dogs are experts at reading human EMOTIONS:  how dogs seem able to show empathy. | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Dogs can read human emotions: Canines recognise when people are feeling happy or sad, even if they've never met them 


  • Scientists tested dogs' ability to read the emotions of human strangers 
  • They were able to combine facial expressions with the tone of voice
  • Dogs were also highly attuned to detecting emotions in other canines
  • Results prove dogs recognise emotions in all humans not just their owners



Scientists believe they have unravelled just how dogs seem able to show empathy.


It is because they are able to rapidly mimic or 'catch' emotions, research suggests.
 

In humans, it has been shown that when experiencing empathy, humans tend to mirror or mimic the emotional expression of the person they are engaging with.
 

Now researchers led by Elisabetta Palagi, of the University of Pisa have found that dogs possess a key 'building-block of empathy' - being able to mimic emotional behaviour in other dogs.
 


By FIONA MACRAE  

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Recherche-info's curator insight, January 13, 2016 4:51 PM

By Fiona Macrae, Science Editor For The Daily Mail, 13.01.2016


Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 15, 2016 11:52 PM

LOS PERROS SON EXPERTOS EN LEER LAS EMOCIONES HUMANAS - LOS CIENTÍFICOS CREEN HABER DESENTRAÑADO CÓMO LOS PERROS PARECEN SER CAPACES DE MOSTRAR EMPATÍA .ELLOS RECONOCEN CUÁNDO UNA PERSONA SE SIENTE TRISTE O FELIZ AUNQUE NUNCA LA HAYAN VISTO ANTES.

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Patient Empathy: It Starts with You

Work can be hectic, long and chaotic. As health care providers, we all need to stop for a moment and think about how small things can make a big difference in other people's lives.
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Doctors often struggle to show compassion while dealing with patients

Doctors often struggle to show compassion while dealing with patients | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

 
Many say our health-care system lacks compassion. I too at times feel that pills and surgeries, CT scans and radiation therapies, biopsies and blood tests have become a priority in medicine and that compassion — the “touchy-feely” part of medicine — has become an afterthought in patient care.


After a few days in the hospital, Mr. Venata’s fever subsided, and I asked if I could talk with him about his experience. He was a retired major who earned a Bronze Star in Vietnam, then became an executive for a multinational company, from which he had recently retired. He had never been married. I wanted to talk to him about how doctors should handle end-of-life situations.


By Manoj Jain

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The simple way doctors can make their patients feel understood

The simple way doctors can make their patients feel understood | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

How often have you gone to doctors and had the following happen: They truly listen. They ask about the worst part of your pain. They walk with you from the exam room back to the reception area.

Exactly. For most Americans, such moments are rare.

But these are some of the specific ways doctors can make a connection so that patients feel understood, according to two experts on physician empathy. The stronger that connection, the more likely patients are to take their medicine or otherwise work with their doctors, resulting in improved health....


In an interview, Epstein said that what he and Back are advocating goes beyond empathy.


“You can be empathetic without being engaged,” he said. “When a doctor says, ‘I can see how this is making you feel sad,’ that’s not implying a personal connection.” But if a doctor says, "I can only begin to imagine….,” there is a conscious change in perception.


By Lena H. Sun 

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Physician empathy boosts patient satisfaction

Physician empathy boosts patient satisfaction | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
A compassionate physician is the most important element of a positive patient experience, according to a recent study.

Researchers found that patients had better health outcomes and were more pleased with their care when they felt their doctor was empathetic.

According to the study, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery, surveyed patients said that empathy from their hand surgeon amounted to nearly two-thirds of their overall satisfaction.

Medical skills are significant in hand and orthopedic surgery, but “this study shows that physician empathy is the best opportunity to improve the patient experience,” said principal investigator Dr. David Ring, an orthopedic surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, in a news release.

 

By Kallie Kouvelis

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Physician empathy associated with decreased patient anxiety

Physician empathy associated with decreased patient anxiety | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

When hospitalists responded to patients with empathy, those patients experienced decreases in anxiety and rated their experiences with the hospitalist more positively, according to findings presented at the Society of Hospital Medicine Annual Meeting.

 

Rachel Weiss, MD, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, and colleagues also found that empathic responses were not associated with length of the patient encounter.

"Experts identify empathic responses to patient expressions of negative emotion — such as anxiety, sadness, and anger — as a key component of patient-centered communication, yet evidence on the impact of empathy on patient-reported outcomes in the hospital is limited," Weiss and colleagues reported in their abstract.

The researchers recorded the audio of 76 patient encounters with 27 physicians at two academic hospitals and surveyed patients about the encounters both before and after. They categorized hospitalist responses as empathic, neutral or nonempathic and evaluated patient anxiety before and after the encounter using the 60-point State Anxiety Scale. They also measured encounter length and patient ratings of the hospitalist and the encounter.

 

Weiss R, et al. Hospitalist Empathy Is Associated with Decreased Patient Anxiety and Higher Ratings of Communication in Admission Encounters. Presented at: Society for Hospital Medicine Annual Meeting; March 6-9, 2016; San Diego.

 

image http://bit.ly/dP1O76

 

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EJ Morris's curator insight, March 27, 2016 6:20 PM
Many people  don't  CARE how much someone  knows.. UNTIL they know how much they Care !
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Lori Gruen: Justice and Empathy Beyond the Human

Lori Gruen: Justice and Empathy Beyond the Human | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Author and philosopher Lori Gruen speaks about “Justice and Empathy Beyond the Human.” She talks with Eric Alan about the ability of chimpanzees and other animals to teach us about better relationships.

 

She appears on Thursday, March 10th on the UO campus, as part of Oregon Humanities Center’s year-long focus on

 

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Patients' perceptions of physicians' empathy may affect health outcomes

Patients' perceptions of physicians' empathy may affect health outcomes | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Professor Stewart W. Mercer, the lead author, said: "This new paper adds to evidence already shown that the outcomes of the consultations are worse in such patients in deprived areas, and that an empathic patient-centred approach leads to better outcomes."


The paper also demonstrates the "inverse care law," the principle which holds that the availability of good medical care tends to vary inversely with the need for it in the population served.

 

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How Social Network Science can Foster Empathy among MD’s

Dr. Thomas Lee, Chief Medical Officer of Press-Ganey, a company that surveys hospital patients, discusses his very recent book, AN EPIDEMIC OF EMPATHY IN HEALTHCARE: How to Deliver Compassionate, Connected Patient Care That Creates a Competitive Advantage (McGraw-Hill; November, 2015), and his work in improving the patient experience.
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Clinical Empathy: A Neglected Force for Improving Care

Clinical Empathy: A Neglected Force for Improving Care | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

'When clinicians learn techniques that foster communication with patients, the results can be greater compliance, improved outcomes — and even increased physician satisfaction. 


At A Glance

  • Empathy and better communication from healthcare providers are associated with better patient outcomes.
  • Responding to patients’ facial expressions and body language, asking open-ended questions, and exploring their motivations can establish a rapport that increases patient compliance.
  • Physicians trained in effective communication techniques report greater satisfaction themselves.


Better Outcomes with Empathy

A Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations report found that communication failures were a root cause of more than 70% of serious adverse health outcomes in hospitals.


And conversely, studies have shown that clinical empathy is clearly associated with better patient outcomes. In two studies of diabetes patients, researchers administered the Jefferson Scale of Empathy to physicians and grouped them according to whether they scored high, medium, or low on empathy skill. The researchers studied diabetes because it has clear patient outcomes that can be tracked in electronic health records.


By Eric Seaborg

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The Case for Empathy by Helen Riess Director of the Empathy and Relational Science Program

The Case for Empathy by  Helen Riess Director of the Empathy and Relational Science Program | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Presented by Helen Riess, MD, Chief Scientific Officer, Empathetics; Associate Professor-Part Time of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Empathy and Relational Science Program at MGH

Dr. Helen Riess will share her research regarding the case for empathy which leads to improved provider-patient communication and patient satisfaction scores. Empathy training helps doctors and nurses more accurately interpret and translate emotional communications, and it can lead to greater trust, safety and satisfaction for patients and medical professionals. The benefits enjoyed by clinicians who have improved their ability to communicate with empathy include:

Higher patient satisfaction ratings
Improved quality of interactions with patients, families and colleagues
Greater patient adherence to treatment and better medical outcomes
Enhanced clinician well-being
Increased job satisfaction and reduced burnout
Lower risk of malpractice claims

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"Automated Empathy" works surprisingly well in healthcare

"Automated Empathy" works surprisingly well in healthcare | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Health care startup made a wild pitch to Cara Waller, CEO of the Newport Orthopedic Institute in Newport Beach. The company said it could get patients more engaged by “automating” physician empathy.

It “almost made me nauseous,” she said. How can you automate something as deeply personal as empathy?

But Waller needed help. Her physicians, who perform as many as 500 surgeries a year, manage large numbers of patients at various stages of treatment and recovery. They needed a better way to communicate with patients and track their progress.


BY BARBARA FEDER OSTROV

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Clinical Empathy in a Post-ACA World

Clinical Empathy in a Post-ACA World | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Speaker: Jodi Halpern, UC Berkeley
Tuesday, 02/09/16

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM


Learn how health care providers can recognize when their emotions are worsening conflicts with patients and families. In the current health care climate, providers are under increasing pressure to do more for patients in less time. Providers want to give empathic care but fear burning out. Patients and families are frustrated with the limitations of the health care system.


As a result, there are often conflicts between providers, patients and families that can undermine effective health care.


Gain exposure to specific skills that promote sustainable empathy to provide more effective care and to enjoy your work more.

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Building Empathy in Healthcare: Kasley Killam and Dr. Helen Riess

Building Empathy in Healthcare: Kasley Killam and Dr. Helen Riess | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Empathy matters for a couple reasons. First, empathy is good for patients. It builds trust, which increases patient satisfaction and compliance. When patients perceive that they connect on common ground with the physician, they have better recovery rates. Second, empathy is good for doctors.


According to research, patients seldom verbalize their emotional concerns outright and, when they do, their doctors often do not acknowledge the concerns. Empathy can counteract this issue, help doctors do their job well, and even buffer against physician burnout.


However, we have a long way to go before empathy is properly incorporated into everyday practice. As one article observed, “the culture of medicine and of medical training may be such that empathy is under-valued and under-taught.” 


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Can Actors Help Teach Doctors How to Be More Empathetic?

Can Actors Help Teach Doctors How to Be More Empathetic? | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
While doctors spend years in school learning how to properly treat patients, it’s medical actors, or “standardized patients,” who help teach them how to be


When Corinne May Botz learned about these actors, she became fascinated by the notion of “playing sick,” especially the ways in which it relates to the theater of medicine and early medical and psychiatric photography.


“I was sick a lot as a child and grew to hate doctors as a result,” she wrote via email. “So the concept of being paid to act sick and the fact that standardized patients give feedback to medical students struck me as empowering and pointed to agency and subjectivity of the patient.,...”


Botz considered questions that would frame the project, specifically whether students could learn empathy through the practice of medicine and whether art could teach viewers about empathy. Flaherty also plays both herself and an SP in an accompanying film Botz created for the project. 


By David Rosenberg

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Why Physicians Need ‘Right Compassion’

Why Physicians Need ‘Right Compassion’ | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
To be effective in relieving suffering, doctors must strike a balance between paucity and excess of empathy.


As a young doctor working in the E.R. my capacity for compassion, and that of my colleagues, was often stretched; this was particularly the case when my patients could be said to have brought misfortune on themselves. I saw drug addicts suffering overdose, teenagers retching after self-poisoning, thieves injured through being arrested, all treated more brusquely than other theoretically more blameless patients.


I tried hard to maintain empathy, reflecting that the overdosed, self-poisoned and criminal may no more have brought their problems on themselves than those with skiing or horse-riding injuries or heart palpitations through overwork.


But it’s complicated: I’ve stitched up many slashed wrists cut not through willfulness but as a release from intense anguish; I’ve attended alcoholics for whom alcohol was clearly a substitute for love.


I may not have always succeeded, but I always hoped that my humanity, or my professional duty to provide a high standard of care, would step in when my compassion was running low.



By GAVIN FRANCIS
NY Time  Opinion Pages
 

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