Empathy Magazine
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Empathy Magazine
The Empathy Movement Magazine: The latest news about empathy from around the world - CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy Movement Magazine

Empathy Movement Magazine | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Sponsored by Edwin Rutsch Empathy Guide Services
Visit  http://cultureofempathy.com/Services/

These one-to-one empathy sessions support; well-being, healing, practicing to be a better listener and supporting you in creating empathic environments in your relationships, family, school, work, communities and beyond.

 

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Sections (each section has it's own Scoop-it)

*   Front Page (this page)
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathic Family & Parenting

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.

 

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Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Our Website CultureOfEmpathy.com

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

 

 

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Brenda Robinson's curator insight, May 13, 2015 9:52 PM

Hon. Liz Sandals: Introduce a new course called "COMPASSION" for Grade 1 and Grade 12. https://www.change.org/p/hon-liz-sandals-introduce-a-new-course-called-compassion-for-grade-1-and-grade-12

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Applied Empathy Podcast Featuring

Applied Empathy Podcast Featuring | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Welcome to Applied Empathy, the monthly conversation series that explores the contexts and behaviors in which empathy flourishes. This month Sub Rosa’s Michael Ventura moderates a panel that delves into differences and similarities across generations. He’s joined by four panelists, each bringing a different generational perspective.

They include: Baby Boomer Alexei Orlov, Business Leader and Global Marketer; Gen-Xer Debra Scherer, Filmmaker, Photographer, Founder and Creative Director of The Culture Crush; Millennial Alexandra Roxo, Co-Founder of Moon Club, Spiritual and Creative Mentor, and Award-winning Filmmaker; and rounding out the panel representing Gen-Z is Michael Flom, Student and Music Entrepreneur. Together, explore the theme: the generational divide, empathy for the ages.
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Empathy Versus Perspective-Taking in the Workplace

Empathy Versus Perspective-Taking in the Workplace | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
The ability to understand another’s perspective or opinion is at the core of most successful interpersonal relationships. However, there are two broad strategies to achieve this understanding: perspective-taking and empathic concern. Perspective-taking, or seeing someone’s side, is defined as taking on another’s point of view through the lens of our own personal goals and intentions. Empathic concern or feeling someone’s pain, similar to empathy, is characterized as an emotional response of taking on someone’s hardship. Although each strategy approaches interpersonal work differently, researchers have largely overlooked their key differences.

PERSPECTIVE-TAKING AND EMPATHIC CONCERN
Through a meta-analysis, a quantitative review and integration of multiple studies, researchers (Longmire & Harrison, 2018) explore the key differences between seeing someone’s side (perspective-taking) and feeling their pain (empathic concern). The authors find that perspective-taking and empathic concern are distinct forms of interpersonal learning. To qualify this finding, the authors focus on three main outcomes of these strategies.

 

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What is empathy?  

Empathy is simpler than a lot of people think. This video defines empathy through 4 easy steps.  
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White People Don't Feel Empathy For People Of Color And Here Is Why That Matters

White People Don't Feel Empathy For People Of Color And Here Is Why That Matters | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
The ability to feel empathy is shaped by our genes, and empathy is pretty fucking important.

 

The ability to feel empathy is shaped by our genes, and empathy is pretty fucking important. It’s what allows us to identify with others and register their suffering as something that should be alleviated, and that we should help to alleviate. Without empathy, there would be no advocacy for social justice and equality because we wouldn’t see disparities and oppression as problems in the first place.

 

While empathetic capacity is something that our genes help to determine, it is also true that empathy can be learned and cultivated. It is true that white people can recognize the unequal power structure of our society and choose to betray the white supremacy that protects them. They can make this decision to better, but the truth is that many of them simply will not. Many of them see the unequal power structure for what it is and work to strengthen it because they feel it’s exactly how the world should operate.

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The Power of Applying Empathy in Business with Micheal Ventura 

Is empathy a crucial business skill? Micheal Ventura and I talk about when, how and why to apply empathy for success.

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Social Empathy: Empathy for Immigrants

Social Empathy: Empathy for Immigrants | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
If you engage in social empathy to understand immigration today, you will see the story of your ancestors.  Would you have wanted your ancestors arrested, shackled at the border, put in prison, separated from their children, and children as young as toddlers not knowing where their parents are?  I think not. 

 

How can we, the descendants of immigrants, not see our family stories retold, not see our own history in the immigrants of today?  Learn about your ancestry and use your social empathy to walk in the shoes of immigrants today.  Welcoming today’s immigrants will feel like welcoming your ancestors home. 

 

Elizabeth A. Segal
Social Empathy 

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Social Empathy: The Art of Understanding Others - Elizabeth A. Segal

Social Empathy: The Art of Understanding Others - Elizabeth A. Segal | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Our ability to understand others and help others understand us is essential to our individual and collective well-being. Yet there are many barriers that keep us from walking in the shoes of others: fear, skepticism, and power structures that separate us from those outside our narrow groups. To progress in a multicultural world and ensure our common good, we need to overcome these obstacles. Our best hope can be found in the skill of empathy.

In Social Empathy, Elizabeth A. Segal explains how we can develop our ability to understand one another and have compassion toward different social groups. When we are socially empathic, we not only imagine what it is like to be another person, but we consider their social, economic, and political circumstances and what shaped them. 

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Social Empathy Center:  The art of understanding others to build a better world

Social Empathy Center:  The art of understanding others to build a better world | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

​Why Do We Need Social Empathy?​
We live in a complex world with billions of people navigating through different systems with numerous perspectives. People need help to understand how we are connected. Knowing what others are thinking and feeling helps us to work with others, but it's not enough to create societal well-being. We need to look beyond the individual. Social Empathy integrates empathic insight on the interpersonal level with an understanding of the larger societal context.

Social Empathy: 

  • Helps us understand social and structural aspects of society
  • Offers explanation for why it is difficult to understand others
  • Can guide social service organizations to create effective programs for the communities they serve
  • Provides an educational model to help policy makers make decisions that are grounded in the experiences of those who will be impacted by the policy
  • Promotes social change​

 

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Social Empathy: Empathy Is More Than “I Hear You”

Social Empathy: Empathy Is More Than “I Hear You” | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
When we think of empathy we are likely to think “I hear you” or imagine “walking a mile in another’s shoes.”  Or we might view empathy as feeling what another person is feeling, or understanding what he or she is thinking.

 

It’s true that if we step into the place of another or imagine what that person is feeling or thinking we might feel empathy, but not necessarily. 

 

Elizabeth A. Segal
Social Empathy 

Aug 02, 2018

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Heartificial Empathy: Putting Heart into Business and Artificial Intelligence

Heartificial Empathy: Putting Heart into Business and Artificial Intelligence | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Heartificial Empathy explores the power of empathy, one of the most untapped levers of productivity in business. In the new tech-infused era, where companies continue to scramble with digital transformation, trying to be more customer centric and spurring innovation and growth, empathy is a killer app. Yet, it can't be taught. Empathy can only be learned. The same is true of both human beings and machines.

 

 Heartificial Empathy looks at some of the pioneering work being done on making bots more sentient and empathic. It also grapples with the major business and ethical challenges associated with making organisations and machines more empathic. Heartificial Empathy attempts to lay out the business case and a path for putting more heart and empathy into business and machines for a healthier and more profitable future.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:
Through Heartificial Empathy, the reader will take away the following learnings:

  • -A strong appreciation for what it takes for individuals to become more empathic
  • -Awareness of the difficulties and limitations for being empathic on a daily basis
  • -The keys to making an entire organisation or brand more empathic
  • -Understand the key issues with programming empathy into artificial intelligence
  • -Avoid some of the pitfalls learned from others who are embarking on “empathy programmes"
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Why practicing empathy matters, and how VR can help

Why practicing empathy matters, and how VR can help | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Virtual reality fills us with awe and adrenaline — and the technology is only at a crude stage, explains VR filmmaker Danfung Dennis. It's capable of inspiring something much greater in us: empathy.


With coming technological advancements in pixel display, haptics, and sound tracking, VR users will finally be able to know what it's like to really take another person's perspective. Empathy is inherent in humans (and other animal species), but just as it can be squashed, it must be practiced in order to develop.


"This ability to improve ourselves to become a more empathetic and compassionate society is what I hope we will use this technology for," Dennis says.

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Oxytocin: why feelings of empathy could cause a drug relapse

Oxytocin: why feelings of empathy could cause a drug relapse | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Testing the link between empathy and drug relapse
Dr. Jonathan Gewirtz led a team of researchers in a series of experiments to analyse the links between empathy, stress, and drug use. They used behavioural conditioning to train a group of mice to mimic drug-seeking behaviour.

The mice were placed in a two-sided compartment. On one side a neutral saline solution was administered, and on the other a dose of morphine. The treatment was repeated ocer the course of several days, and the mice started to associate one side with the drug treatment. Then the researchers mimicked a period of sobriety for the mice by giving them only a saline injection in either side of the compartment for two weeks.
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Active Listening Exercises That Will Help Your Career  

Active Listening Exercises That Will Help Your Career   | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
2. Empathy Building Exercise
Empathy, the feeling of truly caring about and understanding what another human being is going through, is central to active listening.

The Goal
The key question is not the words they are saying but thinking about how they feel. We need to listen and respond in such a way that demonstrates a genuine interest in the other person – this can’t be faked.

How to Do It
Genuine empathy is something that has to be felt, not put on.

When listening, paraphrasing is not the complete answer but can be a good tool to help the other person know that you are truly listening to them. This means repeating back to them your understanding of what they have said
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Helen Riess, M.D. – Empathy in the brain and the world

Helen Riess, M.D. – Empathy in the brain and the world | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Empathy makes us human. Humans make structures that rob us of empathy when we need it most. Helen Riess is trying to reverse that trend.

Empathy is the basic stuff of human connection. It's how we hear and are heard by one another. It's how we deal with one another as people rather than objects. But with massive, relentless trouble in the world, the 24 hour news cycle, the pressure to choose political and social sides, and the struggles of our everyday lives, empathy is sometimes in short supply.

My guest today is the psychiatrist and research scientist Helen Riess. She's an associate clinical professor at Harvard and runs the relational science program at Massachusetts General Hospital as well as the company Empathetics, Inc. Her new book, THE EMPATHY EFFECT7 Neuroscience-based keys for transforming the way we live, love, work, and connect across differences, is all about empathy: where it comes from, what its effects are, and how we can develop more of it.

 

 

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Simulations and Social Empathy: Domestic Violence Education in the New Millennium. 

Simulations and Social Empathy: Domestic Violence Education in the New Millennium.  | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
When teaching about domestic violence, we hope that our students will be moved to act and organize against it within a social justice framework. We argue that instructional simulations can be used to inspire students to do so. Instructional simulations and gaming tools have been part of higher education pedagogical tool kits since at least the 1960s.

 

Yet it is only recently that a domestic violence resource exists that reflects the interdisciplinary, interactive, and empathy-building orientation of feminist pedagogy. Drawing on the concept of "social empathy," we analyze the potential of the instructional simulation "In Her Shoes," developed by the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence, to help students gain knowledge of and empathy for the constrained choices facing battered women, understand the frequent disjuncture between leaving and safety, and close the gap between cultural perceptions and lived realities.

 

Adelman M

Rosenberg KE

Hobart M

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How to Deal With Difficult People, According to Science

How to Deal With Difficult People, According to Science | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

7 ways to deal with difficult people
1. Cultivate empathy

Empathy is key to establishing a meaningful connection with another person. Instead of casting off someone because you view them as difficult or unpleasant, take a minute to put yourself in their shoes. Walk around a bit. Empathy allows you to feel somebody else’s pain, and see the world from their point-of-view. Empathy is hard-wired, but it’s also a skill you can learn and improve.  Here’s how:

Measure your empathy score: First assess how empathic you are. Try this “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” test, which measures your ability to understand the emotional states of other people.
Be curious: When you ask someone about themselves and show curiosity about their life, not only do they feel heard, but it expands your worldview and helps you to understand them better.


Listen: Practice listening hard. Pay close attention to what someone is saying (even if they’re complaining, a common trait in difficult people) and show you’re engaged by looking directly at them. Avoid interrupting and wait until they’re finished making their point before offering your opinion.

 

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Want to Raise Empathetic Kids? Show 'Em How it's Done

Want to Raise Empathetic Kids? Show 'Em How it's Done | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

As it turns out, becoming an empathetic person is a combination of both nature and nurture. We do have some impact on this.

Research by Dr. (Helen) Riess and her collaborators has shown that we are each born with a given number of neurons that participate in an empathetic response. But whether this potential to care appropriately for one’s fellow beings is realized or undermined is largely molded by early life experiences, starting at birth and continuing throughout childhood.

How, then, can a healthy degree of empathy be instilled in a child? “Empathy is a mutable trait, it can be taught,” Dr. Riess told me. “We’re all born with a certain endowment, but it can be dramatically up-regulated or down-regulated depending upon environmental factors,” especially, she said, by the examples set by a child’s caregivers.

 

Meghan Moravcik Walbert

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Social Empathy: What We Say Matters

Social Empathy: What We Say Matters | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Empathy can help us choose our words carefully.

I have been studying empathy in its various forms for years. The more I study interpersonal and social empathy, the more I am careful about what I say because I know that my words send a message that is felt, that is repeated, and that shapes how people react. We have neuroscience evidence that backs us up on this, so we need to take it very seriously.

 

If we refer to people from a certain country or of a certain race in ugly words, that ugly image creates a mental picture that is felt by all of us. We call that affective mentalizing. It is part of the process that leads to our ability to read others. We learn it, and we reflect it. 

 

Elizabeth A. Segal
Social Empathy 

 Oct 18, 2018

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Social Empathy: What a Lack of Social Empathy Looks Like

Social Empathy: What a Lack of Social Empathy Looks Like | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Those who organized those rallies have no interest in social empathy. They do not want to know about people who appear to not be like them. They do not want to discover ways that we share humanity or how similar our life dreams are. 

 

Unfortunately, we have seen the consequences of such separation and fear of others; we see a lack of social empathy. Embracing the symbols of Nazism and the Ku Klux Klan tell us all we need to know about how far a lack of social empathy can go. Genocide, slavery, lynching, these are the worst examples of a lack of social empathy. 

But there was another part of these rallies that defies such a lack of social empathy, and in fact shows how much we do care about others. The thousands of people who marched in Charlottesville last year and in Washington, D.C. this year were promoting understanding of others.  They showed that social empathy can be learned, it can be shared. Thanks to the thousands who were there to celebrate our shared humanity, we saw what social empathy looks like too.   

Elizabeth A. Segal
Social Empathy 

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Social Empathy: Elizabeth A. Segal and Colleagues: Assessing Empathy

Social Empathy: Elizabeth A. Segal and Colleagues: Assessing Empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Empathy is a widely used term, but it is also difficult to define. In recent years, the field of cognitive neuroscience has made impressive strides in identifying neural networks in the brain related to or triggered by empathy. Still, what exactly do we mean when we say that someone has—or lacks—empathy? How is empathy distinguished from sympathy or pity? And is society truly suffering from an "empathy deficit," as some experts have charged??

In Assessing Empathy, Elizabeth A. Segal and colleagues marshal years of research to present a comprehensive definition of empathy, one that links neuroscientific evidence to human service practice. The book begins with a discussion of our current understanding of empathy in neurological, biological, and behavioral terms. The authors explain why empathy is important on both the individual and societal levels.

 

They then introduce the concepts of interpersonal empathy and social empathy, and how these processes can interrelate or operate separately.

 

Finally, they examine the weaknesses of extant empathy assessments before introducing three new, validated measures: the Empathy Assessment Index, the Social Empathy Index, and the Interpersonal and Social Empathy Index.

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Social Empathy:  The Building Blocks of Empathy

Social Empathy:  The Building Blocks of Empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

To help us be more insightful without our own bias, we need to become socially empathic. 

Social empathy leads us to take in the context of other people’s lives.  What might their lived experiences be based on the history of their lives?  How has the history of the groups they may be members of, whether by race,  genderethnicity, or religion, impacted their lives?  What might it be like to walk in the shoes of entire groups of people living today with the influence of history?  None of us are born without any prior identity history. 

 

Some of it is personal, like the influence of your parents and grandparents.  Some of it is based on the groups we belong to, like our religion or race or ethnic background.  Most of it gets absorbed into who we are without planning.  But to be fully empathic we need to consider that those influences are there and impact how we and others act.

 

Elizabeth A. Segal
Social Empathy 

Aug 02, 2018

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Social Empathy:  When We Don’t Apologize

Social Empathy:  When We Don’t Apologize | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Mistakes happen. How do we get past them and repair the damage? Apologizing is an important way. And empathy plays a big part in helping us apologize.

Empathy helps us apologize

These messages are communicated with the help of empathy.  It takes empathy to see the impact of our actions on others, that is, to see how what we do affects others. 

 

It takes empathy to feel what another is feeling.  It takes empathy to be connected deeply enough to another person to recognize how important they are to us.  It takes empathy to feel the hurt that you may have caused in another. 

 

Elizabeth A. Segal
Social Empathy 

Aug 29, 2018

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This Surprising Technology May Be the Key to Encouraging Empathy and Kindness

This Surprising Technology May Be the Key to Encouraging Empathy and Kindness | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
According to new research, now may be the time that technology actually encourages and builds empathy and compassion.

A study published this month in the open-access journal PLOS ONE suggests that Virtual Reality could be a "useful tool to encourage empathy, helpful behavior, and positive attitudes towards marginalized groups." This study, led by Fernanda Herrera from Stanford University, investigated if virtual reality (VR) systems could aid "perspective-taking" -- that is, if participants could successfully imagine what it would be like to be someone else under specific circumstances.
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13 Examples of Empathy

13 Examples of Empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Empathy is the ability to understand and care about the emotions, thoughts and experiences of others. This is often described as the ability to share an emotion. Empathy is a near universal human characteristic that explains a broad range of behaviors both positive and negative. The following are illustrative examples of empathy.

 

  1. Affective Empathy
  2. Cognitive Empathy
  3. Somatic Empathy
  4. Art & Literature
  5. Social Bonds
  6. Non-Human Empathy
  7. Social Behavior
  8. Antisocial Behavior
  9. Leadership Strategy
  10. Empathy Gap
  11. Lack of Empathy
  12. Schadenfreude
  13. Artificial Empathy
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Workday BrandVoice: European Study: Four in Five Business Leaders Face Digital Disconnect

Workday BrandVoice: European Study: Four in Five Business Leaders Face Digital Disconnect | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

You’ve told me that you’re drawn to pursuing love and empathy as the lead for a new economy. Many people will want to know: What do love and empathy have to do with business?

Havea: 

 

Business, at its core, is about supporting people in their journey of life to flourish. That’s love. Empathy is people connecting to one another. It’s feeling what other people feel and understanding what they feel and connecting to that. At the core, business is about relationships and connection.

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