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New study finds that individuals with Asperger's Syndrome don’t lack empathy - in fact if anything they empathize too much

New study finds that individuals with Asperger's Syndrome don’t lack empathy - in fact if anything they empathize too much | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

A ground-breaking study suggests people with autism-spectrum disorders such as Asperger’s do not lack empathy – rather, they feel others’ emotions too intensely to cope.

 

People with Asperger’s syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is a response to being overwhelmed by emotion – an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

 

This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with the “intense world” theory, a new way of thinking about the nature of autism.

 

 by Maia Szalavitz

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Empathy Magazine
The Empathy Movement Magazine: The latest news about empathy from around the world - CultureOfEmpathy.com
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Empathy Movement Magazine

Empathy Movement Magazine | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Sponsored by Edwin Rutsch Empathy Guide Services
Visit  http://cultureofempathy.com/Services/

These one-to-one empathy sessions support; well-being, healing, practicing to be a better listener and supporting you in creating empathic environments in your relationships, family, school, work, communities and beyond.

 

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Brenda Robinson's curator insight, May 13, 2015 9:52 PM

Hon. Liz Sandals: Introduce a new course called "COMPASSION" for Grade 1 and Grade 12. https://www.change.org/p/hon-liz-sandals-introduce-a-new-course-called-compassion-for-grade-1-and-grade-12

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Could an empathy meeting help you see with new eyes? 

Could an empathy meeting help you see with new eyes?  | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Science tells us that empathy is intentional, and it takes practice. The first step toward bringing more empathy into the workplace might be creating or fostering a culture of empathy internally.

 

“If empathy is not an embedded part of your culture, and if you and your colleagues are not sharing stuff about your personal lives or being open about the terrible day you just had, and why,” Conaway explained, “it’s very difficult to force the empathy model onto customers. I think you have to be living it.”

Even as an exercise, it seems worth considering what empathy meetings might do for your company. Who would you invite—your team or a cross-section of the company? The CEO? What is the first question you’d ask? As Conaway explained, some days the questions focused on something really granular, like why they were targeting specific SEO keywords. Other days, it was big picture questions. Either way, the space and time they created at Flow allowed them to get close to the choices they made.

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(Empathy Design) 4 essential steps to designing with empathy

(Empathy Design) 4 essential steps to designing with empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Design thinking is more than just a passing fad. Some of the world’s top brands including IBM, Apple, and Google have embraced the design thinking mindset in an effort to guess less and design products and experiences that truly resonate with their user base. Unlike decades prior, the one-size-fits-all, mass production approach is no longer enough to succeed and thrive.

Design thinking is a human-centric, iterative process to understand the user, challenge assumptions, and redefine problems. It’s made up of five core phases: empathize, define, ideate, prototype, and test. The first step, empathy, draws on our ability as researchers and designers to see the world through other people’s eyes, feel what they feel, and experience things as they do. We do this by putting aside our own preconceived ideas, adopting humility, and choosing to understand the ideas, thoughts, and needs of others instead.

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(Empathic Leadership) Too Much Of A Good Thing: Tips On Avoiding the Dangers Of Unchecked Empathy

(Empathic Leadership) Too Much Of A Good Thing: Tips On Avoiding the Dangers Of Unchecked Empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Empathy is essential for a leader, so how can too much be dangerous? A leader can’t lead effectively without a highly developed capacity for empathy. The ability to get out of your own mental framework and put yourself in other peoples’ shoes is essential for impactful communication, crisis management, business strategy, sales and marketing and successful business relationships.

 

Advice on building this and other soft skills associated with emotional intelligence is flooding the popular business literature.  However, it’s equally important to know when to stop being empathic. 

 

Prudy Gourguechon 

Contributor

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Empathy Matters: Organizations that Study Empathy

Empathy Matters: Organizations that Study Empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Empathy Matters: Organizations that Study Empathy Four organizations that study the role of empathy in human development

 

The role of empathy in education and human development has been the subject of in- depth study in a wide range of fields from sociology, psychology and neuroscience to evolutionary biology, economics and civic engagement.

 

Research clearly shows that empathy matters, whether you’re talking about leadership development and the ability to function within a team, the perceived openness of doctors toward their nurses and patients or a child’s capacity for prosocial behavior and the ability to learn. Indeed, human beings are wired for empathy: the presence of oxytocin, mirror neurons, and thousands of years of evolutionary biology all suggest that our brain circuitry has evolved with empathy at its core.

 

 

  1. CASEL: Founded in 1994 by author Daniel Goleman
  2. Greater Good Science Center: The Greater Good Science Center studies the
  3. Developmental Studies Center: DSC is a nonprofit organization
  4. Teleos Leadership Institute: With his ground-breaking book Emotional

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Empathy and the Future of Policy making

Empathy and the Future of Policy making | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
The public sector must respond more effectively to societal change

The way humans think, behave and connect to each other is increasingly underpinned and driven by technology. For the public sector, this presents new and complex challenges: swiftly evolving tech like AI will change how we work; the rise of politics through social media shifts our context daily, and the increase in citizen activism online means we’re increasingly open to scrutiny and new perspectives.

These are times unlike any faced by public servants before. In order to fulfil our core function — to help politicians serve the people who elected them — we must respond decisively. This challenge is particularly relevant for policymaking, for two reasons:
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Want to raise empathetic kids? Try spending time in nature.  

Want to raise empathetic kids? Try spending time in nature.   | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, I wrote about what kids should do if they found a baby bird on the ground. The idea for the story came from an experience I had with my sons last summer, when we discovered a robin’s nest in a holly bush. The fragile home, stitched together with twigs and lined with dried grass, clung to a prickly-leafed branch near the busy bus stop at the edge of our yard in Northwest Washington.

 

We watched the parents deliver dangling worms to the babies, snapped pictures from a distance, fretted through heavy rainstorms and, when they finally grew feathers and disappeared, wondered whether the little birds would make it to adulthood.

 

 

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Why the Best Portrait Photographers Have Great Empathy Skills

Why the Best Portrait Photographers Have Great Empathy Skills | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
To be a good portrait photographer, you of course need to have solid lighting and shooting skills, but that's not all of it. Being a great portraitist take a strong ability to connect with your subjects, and this great video investigates why empathy is the key to doing that.


Coming to you from Sean Tucker, this wonderfully insightful video examines the concept of empathy and how it applies to portrait photography. A big part of shooting a portrait is successfully engaging with your subject to make them feel comfortable in front of the lens. Empathy is so important because it's a higher level of engagement than sympathy

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7 Habits of Highly Empathetic Coaches

7 Habits of Highly Empathetic Coaches | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Why Empathy Is Important as a Coach
It helps us to understand the unspoken parts of our communication with others.

It helps us to understand and motivate others.

It helps us to understand the pain points about others so that we connect with them a better way.

It helps us to understand what they need from us, and how we can treat them according to how they want to be treated.

It helps us to evaluate more clearly how our words and actions affect or influence the people around us.

It helps us to resolve any potential conflict that may arise from misunderstandings.
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How to Teach Your Kid Empathy

How to Teach Your Kid Empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. It’s essentially being able to put yourself in someone else’s shoes — one step up from plain-old sympathy. And while it may seem silly to think you can teach a baby or toddler the art of empathy, there are actually some really important and easy things you can do to lay the groundwork for a lasting process of growth and compassion.

Teach nonverbal cues
Your child can learn empathy before they even learn language; Dewar suggests using hand gestures, facial expressions and other body language to communicate with your baby. This will help them understand that they can do the same to express themselves — and it will help develop their emotional intelligence and aid them in beginning to read others based on their visual cues.

Be affectionate
Have you heard the joke about the serial killer who was never hugged as a child? There may be some truth to that, Dewar posits. Your kids need affection — so hug them, OK? 

 

Allison Hope

 

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More Than a Feeling: The Role of Empathetic Care in Promoting Safety in Health Care - Carrie Leana, Jirs Meuris, Cait Lamberton, 2018

More Than a Feeling: The Role of Empathetic Care in Promoting Safety in Health Care - Carrie Leana, Jirs Meuris, Cait Lamberton, 2018 | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

In this article, the authors use inductive and deductive methods to explore the role of empathy in care-giving jobs: specifically, the relationship between empathetic care and patient safety. The authors argue that empathetic care is evidenced by extra-role behavior, emotional engagement, and relational richness between paid caregivers and clients.

 

They develop a model using qualitative interviews with paid caregivers and test it using quantitative case studies in six skilled-nursing facilities. Findings show that empathetic care predicts patient safety, but only under some circumstances. Specifically, patient load, overtime work, and financial hardship dampen the otherwise positive relationship between empathetic care and safety. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for the design of care jobs.

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Want to Become More Empathetic? Try This Weird Strategy

Want to Become More Empathetic? Try This Weird Strategy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
But this doesn’t mean you need to be tackled by a 300-pound linebacker to become more empathetic (although that would certainly make you feel some pain). Your path to empathy starts the second you rub your fingers across a rough surface.

In five experiments, people who felt a rough sensation became more empathetic and were willing to give more to those in need. In other words, after encountering a rough surface, your brain reacts as is if you’re in serious pain and increases your feeling for those who are less fortunate. Pacific Standard Magazine captured the results of the study perfectly: “When we experience the sensation of roughness, we care more about people who have it rough.”

Written by Mike Renahan

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(Empathic Healthcare) The meaning and value of empathy for health organizations

(Empathic Healthcare) The meaning and value of empathy for health organizations | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
As empathy has become more central to discussions of experience and engagement, it seems like the right time for sharing this framework outside of academia. My intention is to offer a lens for better understanding of the extent to which the people involved in innovation efforts – and, by extension, the organizations in which they work – exhibit empathy for end users. A few words about the 7 responses:

The way most people conceive of empathy is Shared Feeling or Experience (I have a similar emotion, experience, progress, or challenge), but it’s relatively rare outside of interactions that are based on shared feelings or experiences. In our studies, we saw this type of empathic response in about 2% of clinical encounters.


There is an inherent hierarchy to Confirmation (I hear you and what you’re feeling/experiencing is valid), Pursuit (I hear you and want to know more), and Acknowledgement (I hear you), but all communicate empathy in practice. Taken together, we saw these ways of expressing empathy in about 85% of clinical encounters within our studies.


Responses that do not convey empathy –

Implicit Recognition (focusing on a peripheral aspect of what I heard), Perfunctory Recognition (offering an automatic, scripted response to what I heard), and

 

Denial/Disconfirmation (you don’t feel that way; it’s your fault; ignoring what I heard) – do happen. In our studies, up to 13% of clinical encounters (i.e., way too much).

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The Evolutionary Origins of Empathy

The Evolutionary Origins of Empathy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
With the daily news of violence in the media, it’s useful to remember that humans are cooperative apes, more so than chimpanzees and other primates, writes anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist Sarah Blaffer Hrdy. Hrdy is an influential primatologist devoted to the scientific study of primates (the mammals that include humans), both alive and extinct.

Our inclination for working together emerged in the childrearing practices of our ape ancestors who lived a few million years ago. Hrdy argues that this kind of human cooperation — the shared childcare of these apes — was the turning point that led to us as emotionally modern human beings, capable of mutual recognition and understanding.
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Why You Get Stressed When Your Partner Is Stressed | Brides

Why You Get Stressed When Your Partner Is Stressed | Brides | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

There is a fine line between caring for your spouse, and letting their problems take over your life. Here's what to know about anxiety contagion.

 

When you’re in a relationship, it’s no secret that you share the highs and the lows. You feel elated when your partner is happy, and you can feel completely destroyed when you see them in pain. But it’s actually a more complicated phenomenon than just picking up on and feeding off of someone else's emotions; sometimes, we actually internalizethose emotions and can start to feel them ourselves. Because the truth is, emotions are contagious.

The Power Of Anxiety Contagion

You might worry about catching your partner's flu or cold, but you probably don't think of yourself as catching anxiety. But when you start thinking about emotions as being contagious, it makes a lot of sense. Elaine Hatfield, a social psychologist at the University of Hawaii, has done a lot of research into relationship science and emotion consignation. In a relationship, it's actually really easy to see why we pick up on each other’s emotions.

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(Empathic Leadership)  Empathy Is An Essential Leadership Skill -- And There's Nothing Soft About It

(Empathic Leadership)  Empathy Is An Essential Leadership Skill -- And There's Nothing Soft About It | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

 

I get tired of hearing about “soft skills,” even when it’s acknowledged they are important. No less a hard-muscled body than the U.S. Army, in its Army Field Manual on Leader Development (one of the best resource on leadership I’ve ever seen) insists repeatedly that empathy is essential for competent leadership.

 

Prudy Gourguechon Contributor

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Medical Program: An Epidemic of Empathy in Healthcare: How to Deliver Compassionate, Connected Patient Care

Medical Program: An Epidemic of Empathy in Healthcare: How to Deliver Compassionate, Connected Patient Care | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Revolutionary advances in medical knowledge have caused doctors to become so focused on their narrow fields of expertise that they often overlook the simplest fact of all: their patients are suffering. 

Dr. John Russell welcomes Dr. Thomas Lee, Chief Medical Officer at Press Ganey and author of An Epidemic of Empathy in Healthcare: How to Deliver Compassionate, Connected Patient Care That Creates a Competitive Advantage. Their discussion focuses on the growing divide between world-class medical treatment and compassionate care, and why the two are not mutually exclusive.
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Applying empathy for creative problem solving 

Applying empathy for creative problem solving  | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Join us at our new meeting location WeWork at Goetheplatz for the next circle meeting about "Applying empathy for creative problem solving: An interactive evening dedicated to exploring gender dynamics in the workplace." with our wonderful facilitator Nadia von Oesterreich.

Description: Lean In brings together an incredible network of supportive women. Let’s leverage us coming together to learn about our individual experiences around gender dynamics in the work place. Through a series of interactive exercises, we will recognize patterns and adapt creative problem solving to discover new viewpoints and potential solutions for introducing change.
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Empathy Museum News

Empathy Museum News | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Last month we set up shop for ten days in Worcester city centre, in collaboration with the locally based Company of Others. We traded shoes with 960 visitors and collected seventeen new stories from the people of Worcestershire. Here we are on the local news!

We also joined in with Arrival – the Mayor of London’s celebration of the Windrush generation at City Hall. We were particularly delighted to share the story and shoes of Allan Wilmot – a Jamaican who came to England after fighting in WWII and was giving a talk at the event.

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Portrait Photography: Why Empathy makes you Better 

I made a video a couple of years ago saying that it's a great idea for serious portrait photographers to go and get their portraits taken, because it gives them empathy for people who sit in front of their lens on a regular basis. So in this video I head through to Tommy Reynolds' studio for a portrait session. He and I both give some tips and share our thoughts on why teaching yourself to work well with people will make you a better portrait photographer.
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How to Design a Customer Experience Strategy

How to Design a Customer Experience Strategy | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

PERSONAS
Developing a persona is the first step in the research process. A persona is a ‘character’ developed through research, to represent a common group of people. By developing 1-5 personas of your customer base, you can better understand the psyche of your customers and build experiences for your most valuable segments.

 

If you start with building empathy and understanding the profile of your key customer segments, you have a way to connect with them so that everyone has a shared understanding of their demographic profile, behaviors, and pain points. The persona should include an image of the imaginary customer, demographic profile, attributes and motivations, needs, pain points, and actual customer quotes. To create the persona(s) you should conduct customer interviews and analyze and theme your data to draw meaningful insights that relate to various customer types.

EMPATHY MAPPING
An empathy map is a tool used to better understand the needs of customers. It allows teams to provide a complete picture of the customer and what actions they might take as a result of their beliefs, emotions, and behaviors. Empathy mapping uses 4 quadrants labeled as ‘think’, ‘feel’, ‘say’, ‘do’ to help make sense of different aspects of the customer’s experience and preferences.

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Developing Empathy in Kids Ages 5-8

Developing Empathy in Kids Ages 5-8 | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Empathy is the ability to understand and respect the perspective of others. It is at the root of a child’s ability to be kind and compassionate. A child’s sense of empathy appears early in life, which can be seen in the way that infants cry when they hear another baby cry or when they try to console one another on the playground. Studies have found that when young children take another person’s perspective and apply it to their interactions, they are more likely to succeed in social settings and are better-liked by their peers.

Show your child empathy. Listen carefully as he talks, acknowledge what he says and ask him questions about his feelings and thoughts. As they get older, children’s capacity for empathy can mature through social interactions, although for some children it happens more naturally than for others. Have a picnic with your child. You can invite a few of his furry friends or action figures over and ask him about his day. If he tells you about a difficult encounter, ask him how he felt and what he thinks the other person in the situation felt, and have him tell you what he could do the next time.
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The Limits of Empathy  

The Limits of Empathy   | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
Paul Bloom’s book Against Empathy was bound to be either advocacy for cruelty and sadism, or a horribly misguided attempt to improve the world, or false advertising (it would turn out he’s only against the most narrowly or bizarrely defined concept of empathy), or genuinely interesting. It turns out to be a combination of the last two, plus a third part made up of numerous lengthy but tangentially related topics — some of them also interesting.

The book’s subtitle is “The Case for Rational Compassion.” Bloom is not against thinking through how others might feel about or be impacted by actions. He’s against the process of actually trying to feel what one imagines others would feel. Except that he’s not against it, he’s only against too much of it. He’s against the fairly strawmanish position that one ought to engage in feeling empathy 24/7, that one ought to engage in no other mental processes, that thinking about things coolly is of zero value, and so on.

By David Swanson

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Active Listening and Fred Rogers –

Active Listening and Fred Rogers – | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it
About 15 years ago, the topic of Active Listening was all the rage in corporate training. There was a study at the time that showed that most people practiced what we call “Passive Listening” which means that you are basically just waiting for your turn to speak while the other person is speaking.

 

You avoid interrupting, you politely wait for a long enough pause, and then you unleash your suppressed brilliance in an effusive manner. That’s passive listening: listening for your chance to speak. Passive listening is by nature competitive. You are cooperating with the other person through your patience, but in reality you’re just waiting for your chance to shine.

By contrast, Active Listening was something we were told was practiced in some Asian cultures. Rather than waiting for a pause so you can finally say that witty thing that you thought of, the quick comeback, the mindblowing retort, or one-upping story, you actually listen fully to what they are saying, how they are saying it, and more importantly, how they feel. You try to understand two things fully:

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Thai cave rescue: is it okay to make a spectacle out of trauma?

Thai cave rescue: is it okay to make a spectacle out of trauma? | Empathy Magazine | Scoop.it

Brian Resnick
You use a really intriguing term to describe the appeal of watching disasters (and potential disasters) — “empathetic hedonism.” What is it, and why is it a motivating factor keeping people glued to their TVs for disaster or trauma coverage?

Tim Recuber
There’s a certain kind of pleasure in really feeling for someone else, even if those feeling are bad. That’s what that term is trying to name.

In a culture that tries to venerate empathy, being able to say, “I saw that footage, it’s really horrible, I feel horrible for those kids” ... it does mark you as a moral person. That tends to be valuable today [to be seen as] an empathetic person. People get to demonstrate they have this ability.

Brian Resnick
So it’s empathetic in the sense that we grow attached to narratives. There’s human emotions involved, and we can imagine what it might feel like to be trapped in a cave. But it’s hedonistic because we enjoy watching these things, sharing these things, talking about them?

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