Emergency Nursing
3.9K views | +1 today
Follow
Emergency Nursing
Articles for ED nurses - education, social media, tips and news
Curated by Tamara Hills
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Spotting the Sick Child

Spotting the Sick Child | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Tamara Hills's insight:

This site requires registration (free) and is for health care professionals. It is a fantastic resource for paediatric assessment. Many short video examples of real life sick children make this compulsory viewing for anyone who deals with sick kids on a regular basis. Highly recommended!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

EM in 5

EM in 5 | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Nice What can you learn in 5 min?

Tamara Hills's insight:

Nice site that offers emergency medicine education in short bursts. Great source of FOAMed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Pediatric anaphylaxis

Pediatric anaphylaxis | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
A question-and-answer review of 'An Evidence-Based Review Of Pediatric Anaphylaxis' from EBMedicine's Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice.
Tamara Hills's insight:

Worth reading and rehearsing - if a paediatric anaphylaxis presents to your ED you won't have time to look for this article - and lives will depend on it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Poor observation skills are risking patients' lives

Poor observation skills are risking patients' lives | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Patients’ lives are being put at risk because of poor practice in basic patient observations, Nursing Times can reveal.
Tamara Hills's insight:

Although this was posted in 2009, I think the article and comments are still topical today. In summary - nurses must hone their observational skills. As a fan of Sherlock Holmes (particularly Benedict Cumberbatch’s interpretation), I have read about Dr. Joseph Bell (who inspired Arthur Conan Doyle’s portrayal of Sherlock).

"All Edinburgh medical students remember Joseph Bell – Joe Bell – as they called him. Always alert, always up and doing, nothing ever escaped that keen eye of his. He read both patients and students like so many open books. His diagnosis was almost never at fault."

(Quoted from: " The Original of Sherlock Holmes" by Dr. Harold Emery Jones.)

One of my personal/nursing goals is to become a better observer - of my patients, colleagues, environment. Not sure how to pursue this goal in a structured way, but I’m working on that.

more...
Haley Finley's curator insight, January 4, 2014 9:27 PM

I have learned that many patients are unsatisfied with nurses and hospitals. A lot of the patients notice nurses making mistakes or a nurse failing to notice a patients condition. Many commented that nurses have become too reliant on technology and don't use common sense as much as they should. As a nurse it is very important to use common sense and to always be alert and focused.

Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

AMA publishes recommendations for hospital quality and safety | Australian Hospital Review – Hospital News | Hospital Resources

AMA publishes recommendations for hospital quality and safety | Australian Hospital Review – Hospital News | Hospital Resources | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Tamara Hills's insight:

Some recommendations for improving the safety of the 8.9 million patients who present to Australian hospitals each year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Everybody has a nose (The Intranasal way) (Emergency medicine for Registrars/Residents)

Everybody has a nose (The Intranasal way) (Emergency medicine for Registrars/Residents) | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Tamara Hills's insight:

Dr Valerio Brasca's discussion on the benefits of intranasal medication administration. The PK format makes this a very watchable and informative presentation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

SMACCtastic PK talks!

SMACCtastic PK talks! | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
The first crop of SMACCtastic PK SMACC-talks have gone live - and they're awesome! You'll regret it if you don't watch these engaging presentations ASAP.
Tamara Hills's insight:

A bit of shameless self-promotion, here. But really - each of these talks is worth watching. A great variety of presenters and topics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Taking Medical Education Global: The GMEP

Taking Medical Education Global: The GMEP | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Aaron Sparshott via IVLine

 

An introduction to the GMEP website, which I've loved in beta. Exciting to see it go live! Congratulations, Mike Cadogan and team.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

How do we heal medicine?

TED talk by surgeon and author, Atul Gawande.

 

“You can't make a recipe for something as complicated as surgery. Instead, you can make a recipe for how to have a team that's prepared for the unexpected.”

 

Gawande is author of "The Checklist Manifesto" which describes how a simple checklist can significantly reduce risk of surgery-associated infections.

 

Do you think we can heal medicine with something as simple as a checklist? Is your resus team prepared for the unexpected?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Releasing the Roman Breastplate

Releasing the Roman Breastplate | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Chris Nickson via Life in the Fast Lane

 

"...studies have shown that a reluctance to perform escharotomies means nearly half of all pediatric burns patients have inadequately released burns prior to arrival at a tertiary burns centre."

 

Use this Q&A format to refresh your knowlege about this rare but important ED procedure.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Spiders and Stingers

Spiders and Stingers | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Chris Nickson

 

"Chris (@precordialthump)'s interest in tropical medicine and envenomtion has lead to him becoming a national expert on the matter. This talk on spider bites and marine envenomation covers the latest research on the subject."

 

Audio plus slides for an informative discussion of Australian spiders and stingers. Helpful for all ED practitioners!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Mechanical Ventilation - The Basic Approach

Mechanical Ventilation - The Basic Approach | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Dr Kent Robinson of Emergency Medicine Education.

 

A straight-forward summary of the two types of ventilation strategies used in ED: a lung-protective strategy, and a strategy for patients with obstructive lung disease.

 

Includes powerpoint presentation slides and suggested initial settings for each strategy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

ROSIER scale at triage

ROSIER scale at triage | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Brief description of ROSIER scale by University of Maryland School of Medicine. Includes a link to sample scale.

 

ROSIER = recognition of stroke in the emergency room.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Ear Pain 5: Otoscope Examination - YouTube

Queen's Meds 115: Family Medicine Ear Pain. Part 5 of 5
Tamara Hills's insight:

This is a nice clear introduction to the correct technique for using an otoscope.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

17 Minutes

During a recent in-service at work, we watched two important videos. One is the story of Martin and Elaine Bromiley, called "Just a routine operation". The other was "Anatomy of a Disaster" by Jo D...
Tamara Hills's insight:

"17 Minutes" is a personal story - one that I hope will inspire and change practice among health care professionals. If you're at all interested in patient safety, I encourage you to explore Crisis Resource Management (CRM) and the stories that keep us real.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

The Solution to Dilution

The Solution to Dilution | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

"Drug dilution is a simple concept – but important to know and really understand in practical terms when working in healthcare...."

Tamara Hills's insight:

If you would panic when asked to explain the difference between 1:1000 and 1:10,000 of adrenaline, READ THIS!

 

There are also some enlightening facts about lignocaine, magnesium, calcium (do you need gluconate or chloride?), and sodium bicarbonate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

EBN Twitter Journal Club – How to participate

EBN Twitter Journal Club – How to participate | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Evidence-Based Nursing is helping nurses use evidence in practice.  Part of this strategy is the EBN Twitter Journal Club.  The club runs
Tamara Hills's insight:

Nurses interested in evidence-based nursing should check out this EBN Twitter Journal Club.

more...
Shiela Pantrini's curator insight, June 18, 2015 4:25 AM

Great way to get your your nurses reading and talking about evidenced-based practice!

Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

A Note to Conference Organizers Everywhere

A Note to Conference Organizers Everywhere | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Social Media, FOAM... Call it what you will, it's pretty amazing. Over the last few months I attended a bunch of conferences without having to pack a single bag.  In fact, I was able to keep up wit...
Tamara Hills's insight:

An excellent post - useful for those who are curious about FOAM and the impact of social media on medical education. Also a reminder of how awesome #smacc2013 is going to be!!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

PEM for Dummies

PEM for Dummies | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Tamara Hills's insight:

Colin Parker's excellent PK talk on the four cornerstones of paediatric emergency medicine.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

End Tidal CO2

End Tidal CO2 | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it
Tamara Hills's insight:

If you want to know more about end tidal CO2 than how to attach the little doovey to the monitor, this is a great place to start!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

When a patient leaves with cannula in-situ.

When a patient leaves with cannula in-situ. | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Ian Miller via impactednurse.com

 

"...the best solution to this problem is a clear discharge checklist. And to develop a culture of using it. Every time."

 

The checklist exists - the culture of using it - every time - that's another matter.

 

This article reminds us why removal of IVCs is such an important issue, and asks "what about patients who have left the ED without informing the staff?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Hypercalcemia in a nutshell

Hypercalcemia in a nutshell | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Casey Parker via Broome Docs

 

 

"The management of hypercalcemia does to some extent depend on the underlying cause, however most of the causes are not readily remediable in the acute sense – hence we have treatments which can be applied to get the calcium down until the smart docs arrive and work out what is going on!"

 

Want to know more about hypercalcaemia management in the ED? Check out this handy overview!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Snakebite

Snakebite | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Chris Nickson

 

The companion talk to "Spiders and Stingers". Invaluable for ED practitioners. Match the audio with the slides for an educational feast!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Are You Too Nice to Lead?

Are You Too Nice to Lead? | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Kate Nasser of Smart SenseAbilities Blog

 

"Business leadership is no longer defined as yelling orders & being tough. Yet can you be too nice to lead"

 

This article seems somewhat light-weight. Maybe worth a read to identify positive and negative leadership traits in yourself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tamara Hills
Scoop.it!

Carbon monoxide toxicity

Carbon monoxide toxicity | Emergency Nursing | Scoop.it

Author: Andy Neill of Emergency Medicine Ireland.

 

"smoke inhalation is the major killer in house fires NOT the burns. It’s easy to get distracted by impressive looking major burns and forget about the invisible little toxicites killing your patient."

 

Question and answer format enables quick review of the major issues to consider.

more...
No comment yet.