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How doctors use social media to promote continuing medical education

How doctors use social media to promote continuing medical education | The Concord Chronicle | Scoop.it

There is so much new technology in medicine that it may be overwhelming for doctors to take it all in from time to time. While studies have clearly shown how electronic health records can benefit providers and how robotics are now being used in surgery, one part of the technological revolution in healthcare that people do not always hear about is social media.

However, social media has been playing a major role in not only helping providers stay connected to patients, but also in continuing medical education. For example, according to a recent article published by InformationWeek, doctors have been using social media outlets such as Twitter to promote the concept of Free Open Access Meducation (medical education). The news source spoke to Mike Cadogan, an emergency medicine physician, educator and digital media enthusiast from Australia who discussed the idea of FOAM back in 2012. According to Cadogan, he was frustrated when he discovered that there was a great deal of resistance among many physicians and medical educators regarding using social media, and he has been fighting to change it.

Using social media for good According to Cadogan, he uses Twitter as a way to direct providers’ attentions to interesting blogs, podcasts, videos and video chats and encourage communication.

“We’ve actively managed to engage a large group of researchers and significant academics who are moving away from writing textbooks and journal articles to doing more in the online arena,” Cadogan told InformationWeek. “That’s lending a sense of credence to what we’re doing.”

He added that there is still plenty to learn from medical journals and other publications. However, it is exciting to think of all the information that can be shared among providers for free with the use of social media.

More on social media in healthcare An article published by Medical Practice Insider explained that more than 75 percent of healthcare costs are related to preventable illnesses. Healthcare providers can use social media to reach out to people who are at the greatest risk of developing preventable illnesses and educate them on ways to keep themselves healthy. For example, the news source explained that the Mayo Clinic has nearly 600,000 followers on Twitter and more than 450,000 people have liked their Facebook page, and that number is growing. The organization as well as other healthcare systems can use social medial to their advantage and better connect with patients.


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Myth and Reality of Doctors Getting Overwhelmed by Emails - Forbes

Myth and Reality of Doctors Getting Overwhelmed by Emails - Forbes | The Concord Chronicle | Scoop.it

(...) "Physicians are understandably concerned about being overwhelmed by emails if they provide an option for secure messaging. As healthcare transforms, financial incentives have a big effect on the willingness to take on what many perceive to be “more unpaid work” (forgetting the fact that playing voicemail tag is also unpaid). Interestingly, the physicians who have given out their phone number or enabled secure email (without remuneration) haven’t found they are overwhelmed by any means. In the case of the groundbreaking Open Notes study, many of the doctors just heard crickets. For those who have proactively enabled email communications, they have experienced a number of benefits. See the section below on improvements in outcomes simply by having email. [Disclosure: One of the capabilities included in the patient relationship management system my company provides is secure email.]

 

Dr. Ted Epperly has been a family doctor for decades and describes his experience as follows:

“I give them both my phone number and a way to contact me via email. In 32 years of being a family physician I have had this privilege abused less than 5 times. On the flip side it has led to many occasions where I have been able to expedite care and save countless number of office visits, ER visits and hospitalizations. That is patient-centered care and I personally feel better for it.” (...)

 

"It is clear that providers can impact how their patients use secure messaging. Providers who suggest that their patients follow up digitally will introduce it with messages that state, “After you’ve taken these new medicines for a couple of weeks, please send me a secure message and tell me how you are doing.” They also advertise their willingness and ability to engage with patients via secure messaging knowing they will have more digital encounters than their counterparts who mention it rarely or not at all.

 

As providers do more of their visits via secure messaging, however, systems will need to think about new models for compensating providers that acknowledge writing a thoughtful message to a patient does take time and needs to be balanced with other work. Some organizations, such as Group Health, expect over a quarter of their doctors’ time will be spent responding to email. The most important driver is reimbursing on outcomes. When that happens, email simply becomes a tool like any other organization (outside healthcare) to enhance communication with their clientele. (...)

 

"Email can be one way to address the problem that patients remember so little of what they are told in the provider’s office. Other options include providing a clinical summary to patients after the visit (as recommended by Meaningful Use measures) and providing documentation of a care plan online for patients to refer to later."

 

[CE: Keep in mind the disclosure before making the leap to secure email between patients and doctors...]

 

 


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Empathy: The Human Connection to Patient Care

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Billing New Physicians Incident-to Current Physicians | Physicians ...

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Physician well-being is essential to optimal patient care

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Hospital to test Google Glass for real-time ER care - FierceHealthIT

Hospital to test Google Glass for real-time ER care - FierceHealthIT | The Concord Chronicle | Scoop.it
In a six-month pilot beginning Friday, the hospital will use the tool to stream live images of patient medical conditions to remote consulting specialists. In particular, the pilot will focus on ER patients with skin conditions who ...
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ERs seeing increase in patients under Obamacare - The Courier-Journal

ERs seeing increase in patients under Obamacare - The Courier-Journal | The Concord Chronicle | Scoop.it
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The Courier-Journal
Nationally, nearly half of ER doctors responding to a recent poll by the American College of Emergency Physicians said they've seen more visits since Jan.
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Hit by a car, an emergency doctor experiences firsthand the shortcomings in ER care

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Staff as misguided questions, skipped tests, left her in a hallway for hours. How can we fix this?
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Dr. Joel Krause - Managing radiation exposure in the Emergency Department

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Pharmacists Reminded of Need to Be Vigilant in Preparation of Dose Administration Aids

Pharmacists Reminded of Need to Be Vigilant in Preparation of Dose Administration Aids | The Concord Chronicle | Scoop.it
Grant Kardachi Pharmacists have been reminded of the need to follow correct standards and procedures in the preparation of dose administration aids (DAAs) (Pharmacists Reminded of Need to Be Vigilant in Preparation of Dose Administration Aids -
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101 Personal Experiments in Emergency Medicine Education - St ...

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101 philosophical and personal experiments in emergency medicine. Excercises for the emergency physician's mind and practice.
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For physicians, the applications of tablets are endless - KevinMD.com

For physicians, the applications of tablets are endless - KevinMD.com | The Concord Chronicle | Scoop.it
Medicine is becoming mobile. Physicians, nurses and other health care providers must be able to quickly assimilate and react to an overwhelming stream of data. Tablet technologies, such as the iPad, have been incorporated ...
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