Elementary Research
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Elementary Research
Inspirations for helping elementary school students, teachers, & staff research more effectively.
Curated by Jenny Lussier
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Why we need a new approach to teaching digital literacy 

Why we need a new approach to teaching digital literacy  | Elementary Research | Scoop.it
To assess the credibility of the information they find online, students should turn to the power of the web to determine its trustworthiness.

Via Karen Bonanno
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, March 11, 3:09 AM
"It’s not enough to have the librarian teach a one-off lesson on the subject. Rather, to become adept at distinguishing between credible and spurious information, students will need reinforcement from across the curriculum".So true! 
 
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Kiddle - a visual search engine for kids

Kiddle - a visual search engine for kids | Elementary Research | Scoop.it

Kiddle - a visual search engine for kids, powered by editors and Google safe search.


Via Mary Reilley Clark, GwynethJones
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Brenda Rogers's curator insight, March 6, 2016 4:11 PM

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:


The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
***Update****
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 

So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
Susanne Sharkey's curator insight, March 7, 2016 7:39 AM

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
lfredric's curator insight, March 9, 2016 4:38 PM

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
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Education - Right Question Institute

What is one essential skill that can facilitate all learning? What can we do in order to learn more, produce new ideas and generate creative solutions? W
Jenny Lussier's insight:

Questioning seems to be one of the most essential skills that we are not teaching right now. We are setting out to change that. Great process in this article.

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What Are We Asking Kids to Do? Designing Research Projects That Ignite Creativity | Knowledge Quest

What Are We Asking Kids to Do? Designing Research Projects That Ignite Creativity | Knowledge Quest | Elementary Research | Scoop.it
What Are We Asking Kids to Do? We’ve all collected research projects that have been less than inspiring. A list of facts glued onto a poster board. PowerPoint presentations with ten bullets on a page that are all but plagiarized.... Read More ›

Via Karen Bonanno
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Literacy Minute: Basic Note Taking Skills

Literacy Minute: Basic Note Taking Skills | Elementary Research | Scoop.it
Jenny Lussier's insight:

Any tips I can get for notetaking - very helpful.

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Elementary Research Online - beyond google

Elementary Research Online - beyond google | Elementary Research | Scoop.it
Google has become a proprietary eponym in our modern internet age. Much like Xerox means copy, and Kleenex means tissue, Google has become synonymous with research. But how can we help students search in a safe, meaningful & reliable way?
Jenny Lussier's insight:

I love the ideas for online research tools.

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