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Farnell United Kingdom | Electronic Components | Electronic Parts

Farnell United Kingdom | Electronic Components | Electronic Parts | Electronics | Scoop.it
Farnell UK is a world-leading marketer and distributor of electronic and maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) products.
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Stray Dogs Have Learned To Master Moscows Immense And Complex Subway System

Stray Dogs Have Learned To Master Moscows Immense And Complex Subway System | Electronics | Scoop.it

Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B. Some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops. The human commuters around them are so accustomed to it that they rarely seem to notice.

 

As many as 35,000 stray dogs live in Russia's capital city. They can be found everywhere, from markets to construction sites to underground passageways, scrounging for food and trying to survive. Taking the subway is just one of many tactics the strays have come up with for surviving in the manmade wilderness around them. Only a small fraction of strays have figured out how to navigate the maze that is Moscow's subway system. What's most impressive about the subway dogs, is their ability to deal with the Metro's loud noises and packed crowds, distractions that domesticated dogs often cannot handle.

 

Author Eugene Linden, who has been writing about animal intelligence for 40 years, says that Moscow's resourceful stray dogs are just one of what are now thousands of recorded examples of wild, feral and domesticated animals demonstrating what appears, at least, to be what humans might call flexible open-ended reasoning and conscious thought.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Enceladus: home of alien lifeforms? Plumes of ice particles, water vapor and organic compounds

Enceladus: home of alien lifeforms? Plumes of ice particles, water vapor and organic compounds | Electronics | Scoop.it

Mars might dominates the search for extraterrestrial life in our solar system, but a growing number of scientists believe Enceladus, an icy moon of Saturn, is a much better bet. Many now believe it offers the best hope we have of discovering life on another world inside our solar system.

 

As a a moon, Enceladus with its mere 310 miles in diameter is quite small, and is orbiting in deep, cold space, 1 billion miles away from the warmth of the sun. However, what makes Enceladus a prime candidate for harboring life -- it got liquid water, organic material and a source of heat. Cassini's observations suggest Enceladus possesses a subterranean ocean that is kept liquid by the moon's internal heat. The unknown source of energy is producing around 16 gigawatts of power and looks very like the geothermal energy sources we have on Earth – like the deep vents we see in our ocean beds and which bubble up hot gases.

 

At the moon's south pole, Enceladus's underground ocean appears to rise close to the surface. At a few sites, cracks have developed and water is bubbling to the surface before being vented into space, along with complex organic chemicals that also appear to have built up in its sea.

 

Equally remarkable is the impact of this water on Saturn. The planet is famed for its complex system of rings, made of bands of small particles in orbit round the planet. There are seven main rings: A, B, C, D, E, F and G, and the giant E-ring is linked directly with Enceladus. The water the moon vents into space turns into ice crystals and these feed the planet's E-ring. If all geysers of Enceladus were turned off, the great E-ring of Saturn would disappear within a few years. For a little moon, Enceladus has quite an impact.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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