Electoral Processes
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Civics | Welcome

Civics | Welcome | Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
The Civics and Citizenship Education website provides teaching and learning resources relating to all aspects of the democratic process in Australia. A DEST funded project.
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CompleteTeacherGuide.pdf

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Natalie Jones's comment, April 22, 2013 7:36 PM
Description:
This resource provides information and activities for a teacher who is teaching in Australian about the electoral process. This is a good resource as it is from the Australian electoral commission and has up to date information on the current electoral process. It is a good starting point for a teacher who is trying to build their own personal knowledge about the subject matter in order to teach it effectively. The information is laid out in a clear and concise manner, with some suggestions to activities that could be used in your classroom.

Teachers need to be careful however when using sources like this, that they do not become too focused on being content heavy and simply relaying the information in the text. Despite information and knowledge being good and vital in HSIE it is also important that students learn to effectively use this information and engage more fully in the text. “Worthwhile authentic learning in SOSE engages students in active problem solving and higher order thinking” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p103) . Students need not only to learn the information presented in this text, but be able to apply more skills for it to be “authentic learning”.

Reference:
Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.
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Student Animations and Interactives - History Of Voting

Student Animations and Interactives - History Of Voting | Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
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Natalie Jones's comment, April 21, 2013 10:27 PM
Description:
This is a fun and informative interactive video, which depicts the history of voting in Australia, and how the electoral process has changed in Australia since 1856. It is an educational resource, that has been produced by the Australian Electoral Commission in order to educate students about the voting process that is used in Australia. Within the interactive video, students can choose the year that they wish to explore, a cartoon character pops up and explains what happened at this point in history. Students have the ability to pause and restart, and go back to the bits that interest them.

Teaching Idea/Assessment:
A good starting point with this resource, would be to allow for students to explore it individually or in pairs. To look through the different years and then do the quiz at the end of the video in order to test what they have learnt. This could be done through giving them questions to answer, that require them to look through the video. Or depending on the students, ability, they can also do their own note taking activity, writing down the points that they feel are the most important.

From this students in groups create a flow chart depicting the series of events that have led to the current electoral process being in place. This activity will be a visual and written flow chart, students will visually represent each stage, and have a written description underneath. This flow chart can be used to assess a students understanding of the electoral process in Australia, and the way in which it has changed over the years.
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Caribbean Elections - Learning Resources: Types of Electoral Systems

Caribbean Elections - Learning Resources: Types of Electoral Systems | Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
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Description

This resource outlines the way that there are many varying electoral processes around the world and that it is not simply conducted in the exact same way as Australia. This resource would be used as a starting point for a teacher, as it outlines clearly the different types of electing leaders and gives examples from different countries. It is not a resource that I would use as a starting point in a classroom, as it can build on students knowledge of the Australian system, by adding and extending their understanding.

 

Teaching Idea/Assessment:

Students use this resource as a starting point for exploring different countries ways of conducting an election. The teacher allocates a country (listed in the resource) with a different electoral process to each small group of students. The students are then required to research that electoral process themselves, and find out how it works. In a poster presentation students are required to describe the electoral process and also mention some of the positive and negative aspects of the process that they have chosen. This demonstrates to students the different ways in which elections can be conducted, not just in the same way that it is done in Australia.

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Voting rights for Aboriginal people - Creative Spirits

Voting rights for Aboriginal people - Creative Spirits | Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
Some Aboriginal people were granted voting rights in the 1850s, but it wasn’t until 1962 that all Aboriginal Australians were allowed to vote.
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Natalie Jones's comment, April 22, 2013 3:42 AM
Description:
This online resource I would use mainly as a teacher, in order to understand the history of aboriginal voting, and the way that it has been effected by the electoral process. It provides a need aboriginal perspective on this topic, as Aboriginal people were not able to vote in elections until 1962. Within this website there are multiple useful parts that could be used in a lesson. Firstly a brief history of voting for Aboriginal people in Australia followed by a video and a poem included at the end. All of which could be used in a lesson.

Teaching Idea/Assessment:
This resource would be very interesting to explore in the classroom with a year5/6 group of students. Due to the multiple forms of information that it provides, with a brief history, video and with a poem.

The information touches on an issue within the current electoral process. It states, “In 2011, fewer than 50% of eligible Aboriginal electors were enrolled to vote. Of those enrolled fewer than 50% turned up to vote and those who do vote are 3 times more likely to vote informally than others”. Using these statistics in small groups students are required to discuss and brainstorm reasons that this level of enrollment may occur. As well as proposing solutions for what could be done to increase voting in the Aboriginal community. They can use the other information on the site, which states some relevant information. This information is brought back and discussed as a whole class.
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Behind the News - 23/06/2009: Democratic Elections

Behind the News - 23/06/2009: Democratic Elections | Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
Every three years we get the chance to elect someone we want to lead the country Its important because it gives everyone a chance to say what sort of country they want Australia to be Recently
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Natalie Jones's comment, April 21, 2013 10:27 PM
Description:
A video resource that depicts the way in which the electoral process is perceived and conducted in Iran. This resource provides students with a global perspective on the topic of electoral processes. Highlighting to students that elections all over the world are not run in the same manner that it is done in Australia, showing the differences in the way that each electoral process is undertaken. Students are able to explore this, through both looking at the video, and also through the written script included underneath.

Teaching Idea/Assessment:
Students watch the video as a whole class activity, and write their own notes about what is happening. The class then has a discussion over how students viewed the electoral process in Iran, and how they feel it compares to the Australian system. Including both the positive and negatives.

A way in which this resource could be used in exploring electoral processes in a classroom is through a mock election, or if possible a real school election conducted for the year five, future student leaders. Students will be asked to design their own electoral process that they feel will work, and can be conducted in a fair and just manner. They are allowed to use the electoral processes of both Australia and other countries to help them to design their process. This activity, if for a mock election should be done in small groups of 4-5, whereas the school election would be conducted as a whole class activity.

This activity could be used to assess the students understanding of current electoral processes, and the ability to critically approach these processes and decide what they believe is a fair process.