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A Tale of Two MOOCs @ Coursera: Divided by Pedagogy

A Tale of Two MOOCs @ Coursera: Divided by Pedagogy | elearning techniques | Scoop.it
The Web as a classroom is transforming how people learn, is driving the need for new pedagogy; two recently launched courses at Cousera highlight what happens when pedagogical methods fail to adapt...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Maria Toro-Troconis's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:29 AM

Excellent article about the differences in the Pedagogic models: xMOOCs and cMOOCs, followed by two Coursera courses.

Anne Whaits's curator insight, March 7, 2013 12:59 PM

A really good post which argues that it is the learning orientation that determines the pedagogical method selected for instruction. The comparision of pedagogical methods employed in two courses on Coursera reveal the clashes between the views on how people learn.

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Decoding Digital Pedagogy, pt. 1: Beyond the LMS | Digital Pedagogy

Decoding Digital Pedagogy, pt. 1: Beyond the LMS | Digital Pedagogy | elearning techniques | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 9, 2013 8:49 PM

We are not ready to teach online. In a recent conversation with a friend, I found myself puzzled, and a bit troubled, when he expressed confusion about digital pedagogy. He said something to the extent of, "What's the difference between digital pedagogy and teaching online? Aren't all online teachers digital pedagogues?" Being a contemplative guy, I didn't just tip over his drink and walk away. Instead, I pondered the source of his question. Digital pedagogy is largely misunderstood in higher education. The advent of online learning and instructional design brought the classroom onto the web, and with it all manner of teaching: good and bad, coherent and incoherent, networked and disconnected. Whatever pedagogy any given teacher employed in his classroom became digitized. If I teach history by reading from my twenty-year-old notes, or if I lead workshops in creative writing, or if I teach literature through movies, I bring that online and -- boom! -- I'm a digital pedagogue. Right?

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Excellent iPad Apps to Create Interactive eBooks for Teachers and Students

Excellent iPad Apps to Create Interactive eBooks for Teachers and Students | elearning techniques | Scoop.it
Yesterday when I was talking about the 22 rules for effective digital storytelling, I mentioned writing stories as one motivational factor that helps students get engaged in their...
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Via Jon Samuelson
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Rescooped by Mary Horgan from Voices in the Feminine - Digital Delights
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Instructional design: from “packaging” to “scaffolding”

Instructional design: from “packaging” to “scaffolding” | elearning techniques | Scoop.it
In my recent posts, The changing role of L&D: from “packaging” to “scaffolding” plus “social capability building” and Towards the Connected L&D Department I wrote about the need to move fro...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Decoding Digital Pedagogy, pt. 2: (Un)Mapping the Terrain | Digital Pedagogy

Decoding Digital Pedagogy, pt. 2: (Un)Mapping the Terrain | Digital Pedagogy | elearning techniques | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 9, 2013 8:59 PM

Digital pedagogy is not a dancing monkey. It won’t do tricks on command. It won’t come obediently when called. Nobody can show us how to do it or make it happen like magic on our computer screens. There isn’t a 90-minute how-to webinar, and we can’t outsource it.

We become experts in digital pedagogy in the same way we become American literature scholars, medievalists, or doctors of sociology. We become digital pedagogues by spending many years devoting our life to researching, practicing, writing about, presenting on, and teaching digital pedagogies. In other words, we live, work, and build networks within the field. But this isn’t exactly right, because digital pedagogy is less a field and more an active present participle, a way of engaging the world, not a world to itself, a way of approaching the not-at-all-discrete acts of teaching and learning. To become an expert in digital pedagogy, then, we need both experience and openness to each new learning activity, technology, or collaboration. Digital pedagogy is a discipline, but only in the most porous, dynamic, and playful senses of the word.

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The instructional-design Daily

The instructional-design Daily | elearning techniques | Scoop.it
The instructional-design Daily, by gregwilliams123: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos. (The instructional-design Daily is out!
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