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The 30 Best Digital Storytelling Resources for Imaginative Writing Projects

The 30 Best Digital Storytelling Resources for Imaginative Writing Projects | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
Here are 12 of the very best digital storytelling resources from all over the Web—tools for engaging learners in the digital art of storytelling.

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Social Media in Oncology: Does It Help Patients?

Social Media in Oncology: Does It Help Patients? | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

The growth of social media in medicine, particularly oncology, has been impressive. The uses to date have varied from live reporting of meeting presentations to community development and support in any number of diseases. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2015 Annual Meeting had over 74,000 tweets in the month surrounding the actual meeting dates, leading to over 330 million impressions. An "impression" is a tweet that has been delivered to a feed. To relate it to the statistic above, tweets from the ASCO annual meeting were delivered to over 330 million feeds. The 2016 American College of Cardiology conference has had over 31,000 tweets leading to over 197 million impressions. This is just a small sampling of all the information that comes out of conferences.

Using social media for disease/treatment community development and support is also expanding. From dedicated Facebook pages to live Twitter chats, patients now interact with providers and advocates, often in real time. As I write this column, Symplur, a company that monitors and analyzes social media activity in medicine, reports 127 recurring Twitter chats in the upcoming week. Topics vary from rheumatoid arthritis, autism, and movement disorders to various malignancies, among many others.

Now that social media has a firm foothold in medicine, it becomes reasonable to ask whether it is having any impact on patient care or outcomes. This question has been raised in any number of supportive activities in medicine. There are certainly reports that online support groups benefit patients,[1] but the definition of benefit has tended to be somewhat nebulous at best. The first question to ask is, what is an appropriate thing to measure?

 
Now that social media has a firm foothold in medicine, it becomes reasonable to ask whether it is having any impact on patient care or outcomes.
 

In oncology, our usual measured outcome is survival, although quality of life is often co-reported. Quality of life, however, is rarely the primary outcome looked at in any intervention. There have been suggestions that support groups can improve survival in breast cancer, but at least one randomized trial failed to show any impact on survival in breast cancer patients.[2] Is survival the only outcome that we should measure? Can we accept improvements in quality of life as an actionable outcome? What if we show that patients who are involved in social media communities are more likely to be compliant with their care or be more open to clinical trial participation? Would that information be persuasive enough to have granting organizations, institutions, and payers be more open to providing support and recognition to the physicians and support staff involved in these activities?

Answering these questions will take a level of analysis and research that requires external support. To even get to the level of information and structure that granting organizations will be open to reviewing requires some firming up of ideas. There are physicians who are mulling these questions and starting down this path.[3] One such group in development is the Collaboration for Outcomes on Social Media in Oncology (COSMO). This group, of which I am a member, is looking at this with a blank slate, other than initially defining the best questions to ask. We have no hesitation—should the data point in this direction—saying that no positive impact can be determined by these efforts. We also have no problem saying that others may have thoughts on questions to be asked or approaches to take. In the spirit of crowdsourcing, we welcome any input. There are rumblings of an abstract to be presented at the next ASCO Annual Meeting suggesting improvement in survival with the use of patient navigators. Possibly the same could eventually be found with patient involvement in social media.


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Can I Use That Picture? How to Legally Use Copyrighted Images [Infographic]

Can I Use That Picture? How to Legally Use Copyrighted Images [Infographic] | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
A visual, easy-to-understand explanation of public domain, including a flow chart to help you decide whether you can legally use an online image or not.

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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, June 9, 2017 5:01 AM
What was once a web filled with code and scrolling text, the Internet is now the world’s largest conglomerate of images. And as visual content continues to rule, the number of images available online will only grow. But just because you can Google an image — and technically copy or save it — doesn’t mean the web is a free-for-all of visual data. Photographers and designers need to put food on the table. If every online image was available for free, there would be a lot more starving artists. Fortunately for them, copyrights apply in cyberspace just as in print. And anyone using an image without appropriate rights and permissions can find themselves in plenty of hot water. Understanding the ins and outs of image licensing and usage can save digital marketers, web designers and other content curators from unnecessary penalties, ranging from cease and desist notices to lawsuits and financial demands. Want to be sure you properly use images in your online content? An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Just follow our five simple steps, and you just might save yourself a load of legal trouble. 
 
Martin Debattista's curator insight, June 19, 2017 2:42 AM
Creative Commons remains the best licensing system that promotes creative work and its appreciated.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, June 22, 2017 9:43 AM
Can I Use That Picture? How to Legally Use Copyrighted Images [Infographic]
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How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media

How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
The Cleveland Clinic also has a substantial base on social media and has been on Facebook since 2008 and now has about two million Facebook followers.

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A Facebook for Patients: IBM’s Medical Social Network Gets an Upgrade

A Facebook for Patients: IBM’s Medical Social Network Gets an Upgrade | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

IBM has a long-standing commitment to health care and global health. This week the company revamped its “patient portal.” Dubbed the IBM Patient Empowerment System, it now acts like a social network for participating patients.

Especially intriguing here is the interactive nature of the Patient Empowerment System–if a person has an urgent question about the interaction of two drugs, the system will cross check his or her medical records and background and warn yes or no to taking a particular medicine. It also allows patients to log in, update their profiles with prescription information, symptom complaints, blood pressure readings, and to find other patients struggling with similar illnesses or diseases. A patient can send a message to other patients and ask questions about certain medications or offer advice from personal experience.

“Most patients do not have the same access to information available to physicians, such as treatment updates or new warnings from the FDA,” said Joseph Jasinski, IBM Research. “And physicians are not always privy to ongoing patient updates, such as eating habits or long-term monitoring of vital signs. These partial pictures limit the level of care that physicians can provide, as well as the care patients can provide for themselves. The IBM Patient Empowerment System merges these realms, bringing important data to both parties.”


Other medical-focused social networks already exist; PatientsLikeMe is an independent online social network that connects patients based on disease affliction and the focus is on sharing the experience of what it’s like to go through the particular illness–like a social support network.

The IBM system is different for its focus on institutional affiliations–hospitals sign up and integrate the portal into their office procedures.

“Today, patients want to be more involved in managing their clinical data, and are eager to discover relevant and useful medical information for their benefit,” noted Dr. DongKyun Park from Gacheon University Gil Hospital in Korea, the pilot center of the new Patient Empowerment System.

If cities can do it, why not hospitals?

 


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How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic

How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
Health care providers are using wearable technology to enhance the clinical outcomes of sufferers of chronic diseases and improve clinician/patient engagement processes.
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Meetoo For Education

Meetoo For Education | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
Transform the way we learn by engaging every student with Meetoo. Break awkward classroom silences and give students a voice with your real-time poll. 

Turn presentations into two-way conversations. Add polls to your slides in seconds, either beforehand or on the go, with Meetoo’s simple PowerPoint Add-in.


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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, February 11, 2017 4:36 PM

A cool tool (in the form of a PowerPoint add-in) for live polls during meetings or lessons. 

Jarrod Johnson's curator insight, February 12, 2017 6:33 PM
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Magic 2018's curator insight, May 26, 11:53 PM
Meetoo is a user-friendly application that enables teachers and students to interact remotely in a virtual classroom. From simple online discussions to interactive PowerPoint presentations, Meetoo will assist in transforming distance learning.
 
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12 Tools To Create Powerful Presentations

12 Tools To Create Powerful Presentations | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
12 Tools To Create Powerful Presentations Presentations have an important place in the corporate world. Whether presenting product releases or quarterly year reports, a nicely designed presentation captivates the audience. It increases the audience's interaction and interest. A well weaved narration of information in form of a presentation, can instill life to a plain and boring topic as well.

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Nedko Aldev's curator insight, March 16, 2015 9:06 AM

 

231
Aaron Oo Chun Yi's curator insight, March 24, 2015 4:27 AM

Sweet!

donhornsby's curator insight, March 26, 2015 8:39 AM

I was aware of (and used) Prezi - but I haven't heard of the others on this list. 

 

 

(From the article): Presentations have an important place in the corporate world. Whether presenting product releases or quarterly year reports, a nicely designed presentation captivates the audience. It increases the audience’s interaction and interest.  A well weaved narration of information in form of a presentation, can instill life to a plain and boring topic as well.

Apart from the corporate world, presentations are used in education as well. Teachers use presentations to deliver information that is successfully incorporated with videos and pictures, thus grabbing the attention of the students and enriching the learning process along the way.

While its hard to replace professional presentation designers, here is a list of some powerful tools that would help you to create interactive presentations in case of the absence of professional help.

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Creative Free PowerPoint Backgrounds Set

Creative Free PowerPoint Backgrounds Set | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

The Free PowerPoint Backgrounds Set we have in this article can help you get started in creating your own amazing and compelling presentations.


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Training in Business's curator insight, July 2, 2014 9:44 AM

Creative Free PowerPoint Backgrounds Set

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Free Digital Technology Milestones PowerPoint Template | Free Powerpoint Templates

Free Digital Technology Milestones PowerPoint Template | Free Powerpoint Templates | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

Show the trend of your organization in introducing devices into the market, and how their prices have fluctuated with free Digital Technology Milestones PPT


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The Evolution of the Web: Example of Visualization Timeline

The Evolution of the Web: Example of Visualization Timeline | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
The Evolution of the Web is a projec created by Vizzuality, Hyperakt, and members of the Google Chrome team that helps to visualize the main milestones

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Free HTML5 Flip Book Maker

Free HTML5 Flip Book Maker | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
FLIP HTML5 is a Interactive html5 digital publishing platform that makes it easy to create interactive digital publications, including magazines, catalogs, newspapers, books, and more online. Create HTML5 flipbook from PDF to view on iPhone, iPad and Android devices.

 


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Lon Naylor's curator insight, September 22, 2014 6:07 PM

Another visual content idea. 

Miguel Paul Trijaud Calderón's curator insight, September 23, 2014 3:34 AM

Free HTML5 Flip Book Maker. 

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The #PreziTop100 Online Resources Every Presenter Should See

The #PreziTop100 Online Resources Every Presenter Should See | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

We have scoured the web looking for the most inspirational and useful resources for anyone looking to improve their presentation skills; the #PreziTop100 is the result of all this hard work.


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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, May 30, 2014 1:34 PM

Prezi team have assembled a vast list of resources (articles, blogs, videos, podcasts, presentations, books) that may help you become a better presenter.  Put this on your to-do list!

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, June 2, 2014 5:41 AM

Numerous great ideas.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, June 3, 2014 6:46 PM

Prepared by the Prezi team


you have loads of articles, blogs, videos, etc... 

every thing you need to be a better prezi user!!!


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Humanising medicine through social media: Practical guidance for using social media in the Oncology practice

Humanising medicine through social media: Practical guidance for using social media in the Oncology practice

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The Future of Medicine is Online and Social 

The Future of Medicine is Online and Social  | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

Having your regular, yearly exam over Facebook isn’t a future too far off. An interconnected world is becoming increasingly useful to both professionals and patients. Today, social media is more than just liking pictures of your grandma’s dogs; it is helping rural patients receive diagnoses, helping them take their medication correctly, and moving outdated medical centers into the 21st century. On the other hand, digitizing patient records also carries hidden dangers.

 

There’s a future in a socially driven medical world. Where innovation take us this year depends on how fast people want to move forward, and how fast people can be trained to reduce information loss.

Diagnosis

Telemedicine has been around for a long time, it’s broken through the confines of the telephone, moved onto Wi-Fi, and allowed doctors to talk with patients, answer their questions, and even recommend their next moves. There’s even a free app where you can just ask doctors questions. Moving telemedicine forward helps patients avoid needless hospital visits, gives doctors access to rural patients who are chronically underserved, and helps reduce cost, which is very important in American medical care. This would be especially effective if telemedicine moved away from phone calls and specific apps, and onto mainstream social media since people still use apps, but not many apps, and not with any frequency.

Taking Medication Incorrectly

Incorrectly taking medication is a big problem in America. 75 percent of Americans have trouble taking their medication as directed; that’s a huge amount of people who are not taking what they need to get better in a way that will make them better. Having an outlet on social media, or on an app where patients can confirm their medical information, will help them take prescriptions correctly, especially with reminders that pop up, or if it could alert the user to warn about medications that should not be mixed. This is especially helpful for people who don’t want to wait for a pharmacist to be free in order to get drug information.

Upgrades to Systems

Upgrades to online medical sites can help clients pay their bills, get an appointment, or help staff retrieve records faster. Using social media to make upgrades to a medical site could be life-saving; not only does social media allow you to directly relate to your followers, but it can help you specialize onsite to regional needs. This is huge in a global market, where some areas may not be able to run a larger website or might need a slightly different focus in order to clearly navigate.

 

You can even individualize web pages based on different accessibility needs. For example, that colorblindness page probably shouldn’t be full of red and green, and a page for the deaf could offer audio alternatives. Getting that feedback, in real time, from your users, is one of the benefits of upgrading a medical site from real-time social media feedback. If users have different needs, live with different internet speeds, or speak different languages, social media feedback is invaluable.

Information Security

With a growing communication network also comes the need for increased information security and digital backups.

 

Even with backups, about a third of users will lose some of their data through an error with backup methods, meaning that data recovery tools and software are very important — especially when in the medical field. If your primary records are kept online, be sure to have a backup on the cloud and a reliable data recovery tool/resource available if that information goes down; medical records are private, so your recovery resource should be prepared beforehand and discrete. Nothing could be worse than getting a client’s records, losing them, and accidentally giving them medication they are allergic to.  

 

Information security vulnerabilities are a huge liability in digital records, whether you’re talking to patients on social media or just digitizing records. There’s a ton of ways to make your online records safer, not just on social media, but in general. Encrypt files when you send them, verify identity before you send records, keep your servers safe, and ensure human errors stay at a minimum (most data attrition is from human error).

 

There are a few things you can do to reduce human error in your digital world. This is key in the medical industry where human error could cause someone to accidentally leak medical records, violate HIPAA regulations, and potentially lose their job — all because a hacker now knows that Mr. Johnson is allergic to mushrooms. There’s a variety of ways to train human error out of the system and discourage it from happening. For example, this could include standard practices like keeping private cell phones out of main server rooms, because cell phones are an easy security target. They could instead be tucked away in cell phone lockers. You can also train your employees to not download sketchy links in their email, use strong passwords, and let them know where and when they can use the internet for personal time. Nurses looking at Facebook on their lunch break? Not a big deal. Doctors answering questions while logged into the hospital account on a personal device? Kind of a big security risk.

 

Social media is great. It can help our medical community move forward by addressing more patient needs, help patients take their medications, and provide live feedback on how patients and doctors are reacting to the digitization. With digital upgrades comes more security risks. Social media can help patients and doctors alike, but it is essential to not let innovation endanger patient records.


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The End of Human Doctors – The Bleeding Edge of Medical AI Research

The End of Human Doctors – The Bleeding Edge of Medical AI Research | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
More than any other part of this blog series, what we talk about today will have the most impact on whether machines are going to replace doctors anytime soon.

We are going to start exploring the cutting edge of research in medical automation. In the previous articles in this series, we simply assumed deep learning can automate medical tasks. It made sense to do so, so we could get a bunch of concepts and definitions out of the way, but now we get to assess the claim directly.

One major focus of the coming pieces will be barriers to medical AI. So far we have discussed some external barriers to medical disruption, like regulation and the rate of automation, but we haven’t even touched on the technical challenges which could slow down the replacement of doctors.

Today we are going to explore a single research paper that is definitely state of the art. I wanted to review several articles in the one post, but each review is a large undertaking (this one is already 3000 words). There is just too much to talk about in each paper, so I will have to split this review of the evidence across several weeks. A blog series within a blog series.

For this week I offer many thanks to Dr Lily Peng, one of the authors of the paper, who thoroughly answered the methodological questions I had.

Since there is a lot to go over here, I will include another summary box at the end about my thoughts on this research, for the TL:DR crowd ��


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Five Reasons Why Physicians Need to Use Social Media 

Physician participation in social media is a health care imperative according to Dr. Kevin Pho, a practicing internist and the founder of KevinMD.com, a leading online health portal; however, many physicians remain skeptical about the value of social media.  At an Ethics Forum hosted by the Massachusetts Medical Society on December 2, 2011, Pho suggested several reasons why physicians need to embrace new ways to communicate with their patients.

A social media epiphany

Pho began blogging in May, 2004 as a way to share links to health care resources and talk about health care reform.  In the fall of 2004, when the Merck drug Vioxx was recalled, Pho’s office was flooded with patient phone calls.  In response, Pho decided to write a blog post about the recall.  When one of his patients mentioned that the blog post had reassured and comforted him, Pho recognized the tremendous potential of social media.    He realized that patients want health information but are overwhelmed, frustrated, confused and even frightened by what they find online.  Health care professionals, Pho noted, can play an important role by becoming a reputable source of online information or by directing patients to reliable sources.  

Making the case for social media participation

Pho offered five reasons doctors should participate in social media:

Provide context.  Pho pointed out that every day new health stories are published.  Social media is a powerful way for physicians to provide context and meaning to the news items that patients read and view.Dispel myths.  Online health information can be medically and factually inaccurate.  To maintain physicians’ standing as health care authorities, Pho emphasized that it is critical for doctors to use social media to counter myths perpetuated by inaccurate health information.Influence the health care debate.  Pho cited the results of a Gallup survey which concluded that patients trust physicians regarding health care policy. Participation in social media gives physicians a way to express their views and influence the formulation of policies that will shape how medicine is practiced.Choose social networks carefully. There are many different social media networks today. Facebook has been the most popular for a long time, but others are gaining traction too, such as Instagram. It’s a good idea to buy Instagram likes and invest in other social networks, since they are changing the marketing landscape for the healthcare profession.Connect with mainstream media.  Experience with social media can provide physicians with the skills they need to connect with mainstream media.  For example, Pho noted that writing his blog gave him the confidence to write op-eds for mainstream news publications. Hear what patients have to say.  Social media gives patients a place to express their frustrations and concerns about health care.  By listening to patient feedback on his blog, Pho has changed the way he practices medicine.  He now offers same day appointments, doesn’t take his laptop into the exam room and makes sure patients receive their test results.

Rules of engagement

Prior to using social media, Pho suggested that physicians consult guidelines, such as those prepared by the American Medical Association or the Massachusetts Medical Society.    He emphasized that patient privacy always comes first.  He also offered these pointers:

Tiptoe into social media.  Start small by establishing a presence in a single social media community.   Expand your presence as you get more comfortable.Stay professional.  Pho advised that rules for online and offline professional behavior are identical:  behavior on the web is no different from behavior in the exam room.Think twice before you hit enter.  Pho reminded attendees that what you post on the web is permanently indexed by search engines so post thoughtfully not impulsively. Manage your online reputation.  According to Pho you can’t get delete a negative online review but you can downplay its significance by creating a healthy online presence.  He noted that any page you put in your own name such as websites, blogs or social profiles on Linkedin, Twitter or Facebook, will rank more highly in search results than reviews on third party rating sites.  Additionally, he suggested being proactive by asking patients to submit reviews. He noted that most reviews are positive.  He also encourages doctors to Google their name at least once a week to continually monitor and protect their reputations.

 Pho closed by noting that the true value of social media for physicians may be its ability to strengthen and preserve relationships with patients. 


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Astra Hospital's curator insight, May 4, 2017 2:55 AM
True...
 
gary levin's curator insight, May 6, 2017 11:13 AM
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Infographic: Physician Survey Regarding Patients Who Share Wearable Collected Health Data

Infographic: Physician Survey Regarding Patients Who Share Wearable Collected Health Data | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

A WebMD survey finds that patients are more engaged when they share their own health with their doctors.


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Halo Health's curator insight, April 3, 2017 2:31 PM

Interesting graphic about how fitness trackers help with patient engagement.

Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, April 4, 2017 8:45 AM

Value of patient-gathered data is NOT "debatable" anymore, especially with the multiplication of data point tracked...

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Why Do Healthcare Professionals Find Social Media Useful?

Why Do Healthcare Professionals Find Social Media Useful? | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

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rob halkes's curator insight, June 10, 2016 7:08 AM

Nice Overview: WHy do healthcare professionals find social media useful!

Art Jones's curator insight, March 13, 2017 4:02 PM

60% of doctors say social media improves the quality of care delivered to patients. (source: Demi & Cooper Advertising and DC Interactive Group) . How are you using social media?

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Best Presentation Software List: Complete 2017 Guide

Best Presentation Software List: Complete 2017 Guide | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

We’ve created this list of the best presentation software to ensure you make the right call in the platform you select. This articles is the result of several weeks of research and review of 50+ presentation tools currently available on the web.


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Lilydale High School's curator insight, January 7, 2017 7:53 PM
A range of 2017 software for great presentations.
Teresa Maceira's curator insight, January 14, 2017 2:11 PM

A huge well-organised list of the most popular presentation software with short annotations.

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Embed a PowerPoint on your Website

Embed a PowerPoint on your Website | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
I am a big proponent of creating a "digital haversack" where your classroom website contains all of the resources both you as a teacher and your students would need. If I create a slideshow, I will...

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A/Prof Jon Willis's curator insight, June 16, 2014 6:25 PM

Fantastically useful tutorial

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 17, 2014 7:04 AM

Insertar un PowerPoint en un sitio web.

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, July 15, 2014 10:56 AM
This might be nice information to keep in the back of your mind as you work with students this school year.
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Prezi - How to rock a presentation when you can't see your audience

Prezi - How to rock a presentation when you can't see your audience | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
Giving a webinar or remote presentation? These tips will help you engage your audience even w...

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Alfonso Gonzalez's curator insight, July 10, 2014 6:01 PM

Good advice/ideas!

Elena Perrouin's curator insight, July 11, 2014 4:11 AM

In today's connected world we're more and more often brought to communicate "virtually", a few tips how to make it a bit more engaging

Juanita Amiel Townsend's curator insight, June 25, 2017 6:30 PM

This is a solution to a common presentation problem.

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EDpuzzle - prepare a video for your lessons

EDpuzzle - prepare a video for your lessons | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it
Make any video your lesson. Edit a video by cropping it, adding your voice or embedding questions. Then, track your students with powerful hassle-free analytics.

 


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tom jackson's curator insight, August 27, 2014 8:45 AM

Yes, Barb's insights are right on target.  I have been using EdPuzzle and find it easy to use and providing a complete package for teachers who want to ascertain which students viewed the video, answered the embedded questions, which questions were answered correctly or what did they understand from the video!   Highly recommend.

tom jackson's curator insight, August 27, 2014 8:45 AM

Yes, Barb's insights are right on target.  I have been using EdPuzzle and find it easy to use and providing a complete package for teachers who want to ascertain which students viewed the video, answered the embedded questions, which questions were answered correctly or what did they understand from the video!   Highly recommend.

Miguel Paul Trijaud Calderón's curator insight, September 1, 2014 6:04 AM

Edpuzzle -> Add voice or embed questions to ease your students understanding. 

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Animated Idea Clouds PowerPoint Template | PowerPoint Presentation

Animated Idea Clouds PowerPoint Template | PowerPoint Presentation | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

The Idea Clouds PowerPoint Template starts with an animation of clouds and a light bulb, which can be used symbolically for a plethora of topics.


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FPPT's curator insight, September 4, 2014 10:23 PM

PowerPoint templates with cloud background designs and light bulb shapes that you can use to make cloud PowerPoint presentations.

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Animated Workplace PowerPoint Templates | PowerPoint Presentation

Animated Workplace PowerPoint Templates | PowerPoint Presentation | eLearning and eHealth | Scoop.it

This is why we have created a list of PowerPoint templates, animations and clipart which can help you create workplace related presentations with ease. Download work force PowerPoint templates and slide designs for presentations.


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