Eleanor Roosevelt, The Changemaker
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Eleanor Roosevelt, The Changemaker
"Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home - so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person; the neighborhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world."
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Bibliography

www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Eleanor_Roosevelt

 

 

www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=33

 

www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,988155,00.html

 

 

www.whitehouse.gov/about/first-ladies/eleanorroosevelt

 

 

www.udhr.org/history/Biographies/bioer.htm

 

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Eleanor Roosevelt Biography

Although she had already won international respect and admiration in her role as First Lady to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt’s work on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights would become her greatest legacy. She was without doubt, the most influential member of the UN’s Commission on Human Rights.

Unlike most other members of the Commission, Mrs. Roosevelt was neither a scholar nor an expert on international law. Her enthusiasm for her work at the United Nations was rooted in her humanitarian convictions and her steady faith in human dignity and worth. Although she often joked that she was out of place among so many academics and jurists, her intellect and compassion were great assets, and proved to be of crucial importance in the composition of a direct and straightforward Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

With characteristic modesty, Eleanor Roosevelt considered her position on the Commission to be one of ambassador for the common man and woman: "I used to tell my husband that, if he could make me understand something, it would be clear to all other people in the country, and perhaps that will be my real value on this drafting commission!"

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Eleanor Roosevelt- Changemaker

She was born Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, a rich privelesged girl, who grew up in New York. But after the tragic death of her Mother, and soon after, her Father, Anna went to live with her grandmother. During her adolescence, she felt cast aside, and always longed for attention and love. At age 15, she was sent to Allenswood academy in London, where she performed exceptionally well, and gained most of her self-confidence. She continued on to more schooling, and eventually returned home at age 17. She met her fifth cousin Franklin D. Roosevelt at a family event, and after a few years of dating, they got engaged and eventually married. They moved in together in a house in New York. The marriage was going well until one day, she found out that he was cheating. she told him that if he still wanted to be married, he would have to end his affair. He did, and they stayed married, but Anna Eleanor Roosevelt learned that she was the only one who could bring meaning to her life. Because FDR was paralyzed, she began to take over some of his duties, and she get her first taste of involvement in politics and the greater world. It was actually Eleanor that convinced FDR to run for Governor, and eventually President. Since she lived in the early to mid 1900's, there weren't too many Women doing what she did. most women of the time didn't even think of themselves as equals to their husbands, as Eleanor did. In fact, at the time most women just worked as stay-at-home-mothers, and less than 25% of women worked at all outside of the home. It was these women who lacked the empowerment to further their lives, that Eleanor wanted to get involved with. She often wrote magazine articles about female unemployment, education, and the role women played in society. She even went so far as to ban male reporters from being at her conferences, because she felt like the female reporters were often left out. She believed that "women should accept responsibility as citizens" and even after the presidency she continued to write articles and appear on tv shows advocating for women. She was awarded the "United Nations Human Rights Prize" and was the only woman ever to be suggested for a posthumous "Nobel Prize" award. As far as the world is concerned, she made a huge impact on the advancement of the housewife. One of the greatest aspects was that because of her outrageous publicity as the "president's wife", she was able to reach directly into the homes of offput women, through the newspaper, magazines, and television, and help educate them of the many ways they could follow their own dreams, and advance society into equalizing men and woman. She is considered to be one of the most inspirational political women of all time, and her legacy will be remembered for a long time. 

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From Remedial Action to Women's Empowerment « PeaceOps.com ...

From Remedial Action to Women's Empowerment « PeaceOps.com ... | Eleanor Roosevelt, The Changemaker | Scoop.it
The United States Government's final product reflects a relatively forward leaning approach to contractors, including commitments to improving the collection of sex-disaggregated data, efforts to inform program design with context-relevant ...
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Eleanor Roosevelt - Time Magazine

Eleanor Roosevelt - Time Magazine | Eleanor Roosevelt, The Changemaker | Scoop.it
America's most influential First Lady blazed paths for women and led the battle for social justice everywhere...
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Eleanor Roosevelt Quotes - The Quotations Page

A woman is like a tea bag- you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water.


Beautiful young people are accidents of nature, but beautiful old people are works of art.

Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't.

- More quotations on: [Criticism]
Friendship with oneself is all-important, because without it one cannot be friends with anyone else in the world.

Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people.

I could not at any age be content to take my place in a corner by the fireside and simply look on.

I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then live with that decision.

- More quotations on: [Decisions]
If someone betrays you once, it’s their fault; if they betray you twice, it’s your fault.

It is not fair to ask of others what you are unwilling to do yourself.

Justice cannot be for one side alone, but must be for both.

Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself.

Life was meant to be lived, and curiosity must be kept alive. One must never, for whatever reason, turn his back on life.

One thing life has taught me: if you are interested, you never have to look for new interests. They come to you. When you are genuinely interested in one thing, it will always lead to something else.

-
Eleanor Roosevelt

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Best Quote of the Day Eleanor Roosevelt:"It isn't enough...

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (pronounced /ˈɛlɨnɔr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 -- November 7, 1962) was the First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945.
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