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Literary Devices | Literary Terms

Literary Devices | Literary Terms | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
Welcome to the website dedicated to literary devices (literary terms). Here you will find a list literary devices with definitions and examples. Please fee free to post your thoughts and vote on your favorite literary device.
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Virtual classrooms NFB/education - National Film Board of Canada

Virtual classrooms NFB/education - National Film Board of Canada | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
Watch quality Canadian documentary, animation and Fiction
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Telescopic Text → Write

Writing tools for creating expanding narratives
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Expand on your thoughts, your writing.

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Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014

Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014 | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
This list attempts to pinpoint the 10 safest countries in the world by analyzing the Global Peace Index, or GPI, of each country, taking into consideration homicide rates, levels of violent crime, nuclear capabilities and more.

Via Seth Dixon
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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 28, 2014 6:44 PM

None of these countries are surprising. However, many of them have to deal with neighbors and regional issues. New Zealand, on the other hand, does not really have to deal with much. Essentially being isolated except for a large(not differentiating between usable and non usable land), and some small islands to the north - New Zealander's just do their thing and govern their sheep. It goes to show that while they are connected to the global marketplace, by maintaining a small profile and keeping to themselves, they can still enjoy standards of living comparable to the richest and largest nations on the planet. It also helps to have a small population.

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:50 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:45 PM

For looking at crime

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Romeo and Juliet Act IV

Romeo and Juliet Act IV | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
ProProfs Quiz Maker - Do your best to answer these questions from Act IV of Romeo and Juliet. All of the information is in the order that it appears in the play. This is an excellent...
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Literary Devices in Romeo & Juliet flashcards | Quizlet

Vocabulary words for The following literary devices are all terms ninth grade students need to be able to identify and employ in their writing. . Includes studying games and tools such as flashcards.
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Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages

Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it

"Languages spoken by billions of people across Europe and Asia are descended from an ancient tongue uttered in southern Europe at the end of the last ice age, according to research.  The claim, by scientists in Britain, points to a common origin for vocabularies as varied as English and Urdu, Japanese and Itelmen, a language spoken along the north-eastern edge of Russia.  The ancestral language, spoken at least 15,000 years ago, gave rise to seven more that formed an ancient Eurasiatic 'superfamily', the researchers say. These in turn split into languages now spoken all over Eurasia, from Portugal to Siberia."

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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:33 AM

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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6 Traits Resources

6 Traits Resources | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
I highly recommend reading Ruth Culham's book: 6+1 Traits of Writing to enhance your teaching of writing to elementary age students.  The following links are examples of student work taken from her...
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Teacher Webpage

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Sproutster HD

Get Sproutster HD on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
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How can a caring citizen of the world use this?

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Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

"A former gang member from Long Beach, California, teaches break dancing to at-risk youths in Cambodia."


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 2015 3:38 PM

The 21st Century for countries is far different than many others that have gone by.  Globalization is changing how people think about countries and the culture of the sovereign states.  This video shows how an American Gang Banger who is of Cambodian Descent is transforming the life of Cambodian children for the better through Break Dancing and Hip Hop.  The man was exiled from the United States, but brought its culture with him.  However, he became a gang banger in the United States because he was part of an immigrant group the US helped to create by destabilizing the region during the Vietnam War.  This shows just how interconnected the world is becoming.  When he brought Hip Hop and culture from the US with him, the kids wanted to learn break dancing, so now he runs a school and encourages the students to do well and stay clear of drugs.  The paths that led to the creation and success of the school owe themselves to geographical factors.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 2015 5:27 PM

It apperas that one countrys trash is anothers treasure, and possiblty so much more.  You can see first hand in this video how a culture from one part of the world can have great impact on another so different and so far away.  Being deported could be the best thing that happened to this teacher.  It also could be the best thing that happened to a lot of these childrens lives as well.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 17, 11:27 PM
Today’s world is so globalized it’s pretty inevitable that cultural aspects are going to be exchanged. In this case, a man who grew up in the U.S. became a well known break dancer, but ended up being deported to Cambodia after being involved with a gang.  What is interesting about his story is that he had never lived in Cambodia outside of infanthood, so he had to adjust to a whole new culture.  He was approached by some kids who wanted him to teach them to break dance, which is an American form of dance, and he agreed.  He has now been able to use breakdancing as a platform to help at risk kids in the city of Phnom Penh.  Kids are able to attend school to learn technology, English, and breakdancing.  He ensures that they avoid the negative experiences he had in a gang by teaching them about the dangers of drugs and HIV.  It was neat to see Cambodian kids listening to American rap music and breakdancing.  This just shows how something from one culture can be taken and used to help people in another culture.  I think people often think that change and foreigness are negative, but as in this case, sometimes cultural diffusion is beneficial. 
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How to speak Canadian: nine terms that confuse the English-speaking world

How to speak Canadian: nine terms that confuse the English-speaking world | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
Late last year, as actors on U.S. late night shows each took turns impersonating Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, a surprising number decided to portray the chief executive with a stereotypical Canadian accent — nasal, slow and punctuated with “ehs” and “aboots.”
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


Via Seth Dixon
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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Home of Literary Devices and Literary Terms

A catalog of literary devices and literary terms with detailed definition and examples for students and writers.
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Romeo and Juliet Analysis

Romeo and Juliet analysis of literary devices by PhD students from Stanford, Harvard, Berkeley
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Rewordify.com: Understand what you read

Rewordify.com: Understand what you read | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
Rewordify.com helps you understand more of what you read, faster. It translates hard English into easier English.
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Prose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Prose is a form of language which applies ordinary grammatical structure and natural flow of speech rather than rhythmic structure (as in traditional poetry). While there are critical debates on the construction of prose, its simplicity and loosely defined structure has led to its adoption for the majority of spoken dialogue, factual discourse as well as topical and fictional writing. It is commonly used, for example, in literature, newspapers, magazines, encyclopedias, broadcasting, film, history, philosophy, law and many other forms of communication.

Prose lacks the more formal metrical structure of verse that is almost always found in traditional poetry. Poems often involve a meter and/or rhyme scheme. Prose, instead, comprises full, grammatical sentences, which then constitute paragraphs and overlook aesthetic appeal. Some works of prose do contain traces of metrical structure or versification and a conscious blend of the two literature formats is known as prose poetry. Similarly, any work of verse with fewer rules and restrictions is known as free verse. Verse is considered to be more systematic or formulaic, whereas prose is the most reflective of ordinary (often conversational) speech. On this point Samuel Taylor Coleridge requested, jokingly, that novice poets should know the "definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose,—words in their best order; poetry,—the best words in their best order."[1] In Molière's play Le Bourgeois gentilhomme, Monsieur Jourdain asked for something to be written in neither verse nor prose. A philosophy master replied that "there is no other way to express oneself than with prose or verse," for the simple reason being that "everything that is not prose is verse, and everything that is not verse is prose."[2] "So, concerning the mentioned definition, we can say that “thinking is translating ‘prosaic-ideas’ without accessories” since ideas (in brain) do not follow any metrical composition." [3]

There are many types of prose, including nonfictional prose, heroic prose, prose poem, polyphonic prose, alliterative prose, prose fiction and village prose in Russian literature.[4] A prose poem is a composition in prose that has some of the qualities of a poem.[5]

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Prose

Visit this comprehensive resource for a definition and example of Prose used in Poetry composition. Facts and information and how to define Prose. Free educational resource providing an example and definition of Prose.
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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


Via Seth Dixon
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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 11, 2013 8:48 PM

Little bit different to my school:)

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...

Via Seth Dixon
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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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Telescopic Text © Joe Davis 2008

An exploration of scale and levels of detail. How much or little is contained within the tiniest, most ordinary of moments.
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Sentence Fluency - See how you can build your sentences.

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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | ELA Resources and Tools | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!