ELA Social Media Projects
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ELA Social Media Projects
This resource page contains exemplars of social media projects or assignments for English-Language Arts courses (gr. 9 - 12).
Curated by Nona Barker
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Smartphone + apps + creativity = Poetry4Now

Smartphone + apps + creativity = Poetry4Now | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"Have you ever wanted to capture a moment in time so that it didn't get lost in the constantly changing world? Ms. Lacerte and I want to give you that opportunity. We will show you how to encapsulate your world with a unique, meaningful, and expressive art form – poetry! As we've already learned, poetry is everywhere and as you’ll learn during this project, it can be ‘on the go’!

So, what does this all mean? It means you will be creating a poetry time capsule! It won’t be poetry for the sake of writing poetry, it will be Poetry4Now!"

Nona Barker's insight:

Ms. Lacerte and I based this grade 9 poetry project on a lesson I origrinally created for EdTech 541. Students used their smartphones (with a built in camera), apps, and images from their daily lives to create "found" visual poems. The poems were shared on the class blog, and students commented on each other's work. The students' favorite app was "Pic Collage"!  ~ Ms. Barker

 

This page includes the types of poems the students could choose to create, a rubric and our AUP agreement for personal electronic devices (PED).

 

 

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Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 21, 2014 5:57 PM

Use of educational apps to post poetry to Blogger and Twitter using specific hashtags to allow other students to find their posts. Apps utilizied were Audio Boo, Pic Collage, Poetry Everywhere, Note Taking, and Camera App. Students created a time capsule with poetry. This could apply to gaming by students tweeting out specific gaming dialogue or gaming statistics to challenge their peers on high scores, etc.

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Twitter 101 - Set up an account & chat live

Twitter 101 - Set up an account & chat live | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

This resource page was created for our live Twitter chat which occurs November 5, 2013. During Block 4, Ms. Currie's grade 12 class and I will be participating in a live chat about the play, A Streetcar Named Desire. We are using our "school usernames" to create Twitter accounts. Our hashtag is #SND13. 

Nona Barker's insight:

After participating in several live Twitter chats (one my favorites is #21stedchat Sundays at 6 pm MST) for our EdTech 543 class, I thought it would be fun to chat live with our students. Lucky for me, Ms. Currie agreed! We are using this as a culminating activity for the Modern Drama unit. The chat will be archived and shared using Storify. 

 

Live Twitter chats seem like a great way to "review" a play. Students will become the "experts". The moderated Q & A session should be interesting to say the least. Can't wait.

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Discuss "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar" with a High School English Class

Discuss "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar" with a High School English Class | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"We are a 10th grade English class who will be reading Julius Caesar as well as watching the film with Marlon Brando. We would love to discuss it with another class." ~ Mrs. Buescher

Nona Barker's insight:

Mrs. Buescher, a teacher from California, invites another grade 10 class to discuss a Shakespearean play with her class using Skype. She has also invited other classes to discuss a novel and a short story. What a great idea!

 

Having a conversation about a literary text is definitely part of the curriculum in any ELA class -- this invite makes it all the more interesting though! Can you imagine bringing two classes together when they live thousands of miles apart? I wish I had a grade 10 class that could be a part of this conversation.

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The Great Student Blog Project: Student Portfolio

The Great Student Blog Project: Student Portfolio | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"This project, and everything else I do as a part of my practice, is designed to empower you to step into high school (and past high school) more prepared for what you find than anyone else around you. The project is the integrative piece that pulls everything we do together." ~ Mr. Moshe

Nona Barker's insight:

Mr. Moshe's student blog project allows students to create a learning log that houses both their critical and creative writings. The blog is subdivided into specific parts (learning log, poems, short stories, discussion questions, critiques, surveys). The blog becomes the student's e-portfolio but also encourages students to think critically (by becoming "thinkers") which should be reflected in their posts / work exemplars. Students are also expected to intereact with each other by posting "appropriate and thoughtful" comments. Parents and other teachers (within the school) are encouraged to comment on the students' blogs.

 

The project is aligned with the following standards: Common Core, ISTE and NETS.

 

Critical and creative writing is an important aspect of the ELA curriculum as well and this project could be implemented in any classroom in Alberta.

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Classroom + Instagram + Twitter = Self-Reflection

Classroom + Instagram + Twitter = Self-Reflection | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

The Infinite Thinking Machine:  Learning a Go Go Episode: "Thanks to smartphones learning can occur on the go. Like Ms. Highfill and her students, we believe: all the world is a learning canvas, and we're glad to be a player in it." 

 

Nona Barker's insight:

Free Tech For Teachers provides a great 6+ minute video on how learning on the go can change the lives of your students. The episode includes Ms. Highfill's self-reflection project that requires her students to use Instagram and Twitter to share what they have learned (via projects, field trips, and day-to-day activities) in the classroom. Students are encourage to interact with each other via Twitter. Parents are encouraged to follow their children shared feeds.

 

The episode also provides other lesson ideas that educators have used in their classrooms. Eg. 1) Review sessions (the night before a big test) that use free chat services--both students and teachers participate; 2) Host "virtual" interviews with authors and experts via Google hangouts or Skype (students are encouraged to interact with the speaker or expert).

 

Self-reflection is an important outcome in ELA but sometimes gets "glossed over" due to time. This kind of reflection would be easy to complete and monitor because both mediums are user-friendly. Hashtags,TweetDeck and other applications allow "close" monitoring.

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Using Pinterest to Analyze a Shakespearean character

Using Pinterest to Analyze a Shakespearean character | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"Students read William Shakespeare's , Julius Caesar.  In order for them to understand and analyze characterization, students chose one character to role-play and used the social networking website, Pinterest, to complete this characterization assignment.  Students are able to connect with their character by using modern every day connections."

Nona Barker's insight:

What a novel way to complete an analysis for a character!

 

Students were also expected to comment on each other's pins, and help each other gain insight into their chosen character which allowed them to improve their character analysis before it was assessed by the teacher.

 

Scroll down to the bottom of the page, and click the link to the assignment's guidelines and rubric. The "scroll" is worth it!

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Twitter Away Your Weekend (or compare and contrast POVs)

Twitter Away Your Weekend (or compare and contrast POVs) | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

For Tuesday your primary homework is to use and become familiar withTwitter. (See below for some additional Twitter info, but post (tweet) at least 10 times over the weekend.) 

Nona Barker's insight:

How about assigning Twitter for homework? You could do that like this teacher did or ...  

 

What I like about this assignment is that the teacher asks his students to read two articles about Twitter and then tweet in order to learn how Twitter works. You could assign two articles / two readings (eg. find articles with different perspectives / POVs on the same topic) and have the students tweet about what they have read by taking a position and arguing on be half of it. Encourage other students to play the role of "devil's advocate" and have them counter each tweet with an argument against that person's position. This would develop the student's ability to build a more effective argument and/or defend a position.

 

Developing an argument and defending it is an important skill. The diploma exam (critical and analytical response to literature) expects students to take a position or develop a main idea and defend it using supportive details from a text.

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"Twittering Dante" - Documenting a Hero's Journey

"Twittering Dante" - Documenting a Hero's Journey | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"I would use it again," Rayburn said. "It got them engaged in the work and gave me some clear indication that they had read the work and knew what was going on, and it was a little different from the standard 'write an essay on Dante' kind of thing."

Nona Barker's insight:

This article explores Steve Rayburn's "Twittering Dante" assignment. He had his students write 10 tweets from Dante's POV as he journeyed through the 9 circles of Hell. The tweets were directed at his love interest, Beatrice.

 

This assignment could be readily adapted. Have Piggy (from Lord of the Flies) tweet to his aunt or have Ralph (also from LOF) tweet to his father. Another possibility is to use the "hero's journey" like Rayburn did but adapt it using some of the following characters: A) Heracles and the 12 labours [trials and tribulations] B) Odysseus [trials and tribulations via journey home] C) Luke Skywalker [orphan to hero] D) Simba [quest].

 

This assignment can easily be tied to two important concepts in ELA: point of view (POV), archetypes. and the journey motif.

 

Although students could read each others tweets, to make this more interactive the students in the same class should reply to the messages sent by the "character". Someone could take on the role of Beatrice or Piggy's aunt and so on.

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What Is Vine And What's It Doing In My Classroom?

What Is Vine And What's It Doing In My Classroom? | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"“Hands-on experiential learning is the catalyst for creativity and innovation, says Ward. “It teaches students not to be afraid to experiment and learn from trial and error. Once students got over the fear of making a mistake, they had fun experimenting, creating their Vines, and see the responses of their classmates and even industry professionals.”

Nona Barker's insight:

Professor William Ward encourages his students to use Vine (and Twitter) in his social media classes. Students chatted with CMO of Hubspot by incorporating Vine videos in both Q and A's. Vines are also used to promote or recap campus events. Students are encouaged to document their experiences in his course as well.

 

This approach has a lot of potential. I found a high school teacher who has her students create Vines that show them "sharing a line from Macbeth" (complete with costumes and props). Although many complete the activity they don't always allow the teacher to post them to her Twitter feed and only a few of them will post the Vines to their own Twitter feeds. Shyness is a huge factor. This means "interacting" with others is minimal at best. Still I appreciate Ward's insight: students can learn not be afraid to make mistakes, and become creative and innovative people.

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Students' Passion Blogs on iTeach. iLearn.

Students' Passion Blogs on iTeach. iLearn. | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"Using edublogs, share what you are passionate about!" ~ Ms. Morgenson

Nona Barker's insight:

This link shares students' "Passion Blogs". The students share their "passion" with others; they also comment on each other's posts. Posts include images and short but very passionate write ups!

 

An approach like this would gently ease students into writing on-line ... while sharing what is important to them.

 

 

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ELA 10 Blog Project: Exploring theme & personal connections to text

ELA 10 Blog Project: Exploring theme & personal connections to text | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"To complete your Blog Project, you must choose three of the following and write two paragraphs for each. Each major unit (The Mysteries of Life, The Challenges of Life) must be represented in one of your entries." 

 

Thematic topics to consider:

The Joys of Mind, Body, and Spirit                                  Mysteries of the Human Brain and ImaginationMysteries of this World and BeyondThe FantasticExplaining the World through our Foundational StoriesDestiny and Challenges of LifeHuman ExistenceDecisions
Nona Barker's insight:

In Part 1 of this blog project students are encouarged to explore three in-class readings by choosing a corresponding "theme" from the list (above) and discussing how it applies to the reading. (FYI: Part 2 is similar but contains different themes) Students are also expected to comment personally (opinion with evidence) on the text and the theme. As part of the exercise students were asked to comment on each other posts. Unfortunately, based on the student exemplars, this part wasn't always followed through upon. There may have been only one comment per student in the entire entries. The teacher did provide "comment" guidelines.

 

I have included this exemplar anyway as it allows students to explore theme and reflect upon their attitudes towards the text and the theme as well. Students are even encouraged to connect "found" texts to the ones used in class. As long as the teacher builds in time for students to comment on each other's posts this assignment could be very interactive. It could also be used to develop students' critical thinking and self-reflection skills. Eg. Which post do you consider to be the best and why?

 

There certainly is a lot of potential here!

 

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Visual Representation of a Theme via the Instagram Project

Visual Representation of a Theme via the Instagram Project | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"The aim of the Instagram Project is to challenge you (and your group) to communicate a concept from A Raisin in the Sun through the use of visual images.  You will choose a theme/concept statement from the statements we generate or address in our Socratic Seminar at the end of the play. Once you have chosen that statement, you and your group will produce a series of photos that your group will post to Instagram in the form of a photo essay." P.S. There must be at least one student with a smartphone per group. 

Nona Barker's insight:

This collaborative project, posted on Eric Sheninger's blog, is for the play: Raisin in the Sun. The post includes the following items: assignment requirements, possible themes or concepts, and rubric.

 

The assignment applies to the ELA curriculum because the group must determine the work's theme (via interpretation) then visually represent it using photos they "take" themselves. The group must also connect the play and the chosen concept to contemporary society. The rubric stresses visual representation, supportive details and collaboration. Each group must also present their photo essay to the class.

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Exploring News Magazine Covers Using Pinterest

Exploring News Magazine Covers Using Pinterest | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"Pin your images and critique on the pinboard titled “MDLAB 2013: Comparing News Magazine Covers”. In the description box, critique, compare, and contrast the covers using the guiding questions."

Nona Barker's insight:

This comparison and contrast assignment (comparing two magazine covers on the same topic) has students (in small groups) explore how visual imagery affects the viewer. The students may consider how the image provokes emotion or portrays underlying values and/or ideologies. The creator of the assignment provides solid guiding questions, pointers, and a "how to" set up a Pinterest account. The students are also expected to work in groups to complete the assignment. A single pinterest page is created but each member of the group may pin and comment on the page.

 

Pinterest requires the students to write in a concise manner because there is 500 character limit per pin; therefore, it encourages the students to say what they mean, and mean what they say! Concise writing is an important skill in today's world. ELA outcomes also require students to explore how imagery or visual representations reflect cultural values and impact an audience. 

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Midsummer Night's Dream Facebook Assignment: Say "no" to Fakebook and "yes" to Facebook

Midsummer Night's Dream Facebook Assignment: Say "no" to Fakebook and "yes" to Facebook | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"I saw 'Shakesbook' and 'Fakebook' assignments online and used them as inspiration to create this project."

Nona Barker's insight:

Although this involves creating a Fakebook profile for a Shakespearean character, you could easily adapt this and have your students create a real Facebook profile for a character (from a short story, play or novel) on your "class" Facebook page. Students (as their characters) could interact "virtually" with each other if a real Facebook page was used.

 

Ms. Long also allowed her students to modify this assignment by using Twitter to create a character profile. Two students actually tweeted to each other as Helena and Demetrius from "A Midsummer Night's Dream". To me, this provides a real example of "interaction" while completeing a charater profile / study!

 

Ms. Long's lesson provides the assignment, resources and exemplars on her blog.

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Mythological Persona Twitter Assignment - Grade 9

Mythological Persona Twitter Assignment - Grade  9 | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

"We have started our Mythological Twitter Persona Assignment. Directions are posted in Google Docs.  Make sure you are following everyone in our group."

Nona Barker's insight:

This Twitter activity requires each student to adopt a mythological persona and tweet while in character. The teachers used this assignment to teach students the importance of tone and voice as well as the more subtle nuances of a charater's personality. The tweeter's classmates are to "guess" who the tweeter's mythological character is. The idea is to keep the class guessing for as long as possible by tweeting out the character's more subtle traits / details.

 

Mrs. Seale provides the assignment, rubric, and exemplar(s) on this blog. This role-play activity would also enable the students to complete a thorough character anaylsis. 

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Snap Scene: An Instagram #CanLit Project

Snap Scene: An Instagram #CanLit Project | ELA Social Media Projects | Scoop.it

Jessica Kluthe – author, editor, and instructor living in Edmonton, AB -- challenges her readers to stage a scene that illustrates a passage from a book/novel/story/essay. She posted aRosina, The Midwife Snap Scene as an example; to view it on Instagram, please go to http://instagram.com/snapscene (on your phone or on your computer).

Nona Barker's insight:

Students could easily create their own Snap Scene(s) [using Instagram] as  the class studies a novel, short story or play. These Snap Scenes could be posted on the class blog and shared! Their classmates can comment on the scene and critique how well (or not) the scene captures the essence of the character or reflects the importance of setting. Students should use a hashtag (eg. #HSLitProject) so classmates can track and respond to posts.

 

The beauty of this approach is this: it has students consider the importance of setting and what it reveals about character, culture, society, or theme.

 

NOTE: I know we are supposed to find "real" examples of this in a classroom setting. I will keep looking. I know that I would use this with my students! Blogger allows students to use hashtags and respond to each other's posts.

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