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Healthcare Innovation: Where The World Is Going

Healthcare Innovation: Where The World Is Going | EHR Intel | Scoop.it

Meet the new linguistic mashup: "plecosystem," meaning a technological ecosystem comprising different platforms.

I first heard the phrase spoken by John Mattison, MD, Kaiser Permanente's chief medical information officer. Platforms are coming from technology leaders such as Apple, IBM, Google and Microsoft.

"The best prospect from one of these players is that it's a platform," said Steve Savas, managing director of clinical services at Accenture. Rather than trying to create apps that target specific conditions or diseases, the tech stalwarts are building platforms on top of which independent developers can build those very targeted apps. "And that's the place they could have the biggest impact."

IBM and Apple, for instance, have been forthright in saying that "the art of the possible" figures prominently into their plans to foster an ecosystem of applications on top of HealthKit, the iOS and Apple hardware platform. And they do stand to profit handsomely if independent software developers give hospital chief information officers reason to buy armadas of iPads.

"I think the innovators would welcome it from Apple, Microsoft or others because then there are standards and the uptake costs for adopting new innovative technology drops precipitously and it can create an ecosystem around it, much like the app ecosystem around the iPhone," Savas said.

Such a plecosystem, of course, presumes that these new platforms go the way of the iPhone and iPad – stimulating waves of original applications – and don't follow the iPod, which devoured the MP3 market and effectively squashed innovation in that realm.

We're already seeing evidence of the potential for this new plecosystem in mobile health. Provider-centric apps geared for Apple's HealthKit have emerged, ranging from American Well's AmWell, which enables live video visits with doctors, to Patient IO, an app with which physicians can send specific treatment reminders directly to patients.

While the Mayo Clinic has aligned with Apple and Epic in a high-profile triptych, other leading providers are also innovating on Apple's platform. The Cleveland Clinic, for example, has a quiver of apps that run on top of both iOS and Android to target specific conditions including cancer, epilepsy, heart disease, sleeping problems and general wellness.

Electronic health record makers are hopping on board, too. In addition to Epic, athenahealth and Cerner revealed plans to integrate with Apple's platform almost immediately after HealthKit launched; over the summer Apple was also rumored to be in talks with Allscripts.

What's more, with industry analyst firms such as Black Book projecting that the provider landscape will see widespread switching to new EHR vendors, more and more EHR makers are going to tune their software for tablets, phablets and smartphones.

Let's just speculate, for instance, that Apple manages to arrange things such that iPads and iPhones, pre-loaded with mobile-optimized software from Allscripts, Epic or a small and controlled choice of EHRs, are sold and supported by IBM. Well, that's a pretty compelling product.

Likewise, Microsoft and Dell could roll together something similar on the Windows platform. Same goes for Google's Android. Apple products, despite their cool factor, are not for everyone, after all.

Regardless of platform – Android, iOS or Windows – as those configurations become available are you really going to buy your next EHR any other way? And what are your patients going to demand, moving forward, when it comes to consumer-facing products?

We're about to find out. For instance, enough people asked for new means of connectivity and more touch points with doctors that Ochsner Health System integrated its Epic EHR within weeks of HealthKit's release, according to Richard Milani, MD, Ochsner's chief clinical transformation officer.

Much like Ochsner, Duke Medicine integrated Epic with HealthKit right away because it has been trying to better understand how patients are doing on a day-to-day basis at home rather than just during the rare office visits when doctors see them.

"Technologies like HealthKit open the door to patients choosing to share data," said Ricky Bloomfield, MD, director of Duke's mobile technology strategy. "That will let doctors make more informed treatment decisions in cooperation with them."

That last point is where the platform surpasses any single digital nanny or wellness app feeding a wearer's health data into the black hole so many proprietary vendor databases truly are.

Indeed, the overarching plecosystem theme here is the integration of those apps and devices within EHRs and clinical decision support tools, as Mattison told me when I met him at the Healthcare IT News Big Data and Healthcare Analytics Forum in Boston this past November.

That will enable "doctors to lead more with empathy, and to understand values and outcomes to deliver what patients want, not what we think is best for them," he said.

Right now, the plecosystem momentum is powerful – even though Apple, IBM, Google and Microsoft are just getting started – and there's every reason to believe it will get stronger in the months ahead.

"The platform approach," said Accenture's Savas, "will proliferate the innovators."

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Jeri Garner's insight:

EHR are getting smarter and consumers need them to be, but it needs to be easy and available at the touch of a button. Clinicians and CXO's don't have time to sit around analyzing data. The technology needs to make it easy for those caring for the patients to make the right decision at the right time, and drive improved patient outcomes and financial gains. .

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Cameron's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:34 PM

This is a great step for technology, this will indefinitely impact the health industry as well as change the way we live our lives. The author goes in-depth with the possibilities of the platform, letting the readers know that this technology is achievable. It is innovating ideas like these which make millions/billions in the long run.

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How computers change the way we learn

How computers change the way we learn | EHR Intel | Scoop.it

Can technology improve the way we learn and think? Google’s head of research argues we're headed into a new era of education.


Via Nik Peachey
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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, October 31, 2014 6:46 AM

Des applications pour apprendre les langues sont déjà beaucoup utilisées, mais l'article va plus loin.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 8, 2014 11:54 AM

This a conversation dating back to Socrates and others. It is not so much that it changes how we think although it does. The more important point is we remain aware and work with that understanding. How does it impact teaching and learning in the classroom?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Stage 2 meaningful use is driving HIE, EHR data exchange - EHRIntelligence.com

Stage 2 meaningful use is driving HIE, EHR data exchange - EHRIntelligence.com | EHR Intel | Scoop.it
Stage 2 meaningful use is one of the primary drivers of improved health information exchange (HIE) and EHR interoperability, says an eHealth Initiative survey.
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Analysis Of Teladoc Use Seems To Indicate Expanded Access To Care For Patients Without Prior Connection To A Provider

Analysis Of Teladoc Use Seems To Indicate Expanded Access To Care For Patients Without Prior Connection To A Provider | EHR Intel | Scoop.it

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bacigalupe's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:00 AM

Despite the potential benefits of telehealth applications, little is known about their overall impact on care. This is critical because rising health care costs and a shortage of primary care providers make it likely that telehealth services will play an increasingly important role in health care delivery. To help fill this gap in knowledge, we describe early experiences with Teladoc, one of the largest telemedicine providers in the United States, which provides care directly to patients over the telephone or via the Internet. We analyzed claims data for a large California agency serving public employees that recently offered Teladoc as a covered service. The 3,701 Teladoc “visits” we studied were for a broad range of diagnostic categories, the most common of which were acute respiratory conditions, urinary tract infections, and skin problems. Compared to patients who visited a physician’s office for a similar condition, adult Teladoc users were younger and less likely to have used health care before the introduction of Teladoc. Patients who used Teladoc were less likely to have a follow-up visit to any setting, compared to those patients who visited a physician’s office or emergency department. Teladoc appears to be expanding access to patients who are not connected to other providers. Future research should assess the impact of Teladoc and other telehealth interventions on the quality and cost of care.

 
Rescooped by Jeri Garner from EHR and Health IT Consulting
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Will telemedicine help healthcare achieve the triple aim? | EHRintelligence.com

The triple aim is the goal of current healthcare reform through the implementation and adoption of health information technology, but are healthcare organizations and providers overlooking the role of telemedicine in achieving this end?
“The country is trying to figure out how you improve the quality of care for everyone and do so at a lower cost,” says Yulun Wang, PhD, President of the American Telemedicine Association Board of Directors and Chairman & CEO of InTouch Health. “There aren’t many ways to do that, to be frank.”
The healthcare industry is already facing a difficult challenging in transition from volume to value in terms of reimbursements. Add to that what is down the road and the challenge is exacerbated.
“You’ve got an aging population,” Wang explains. “You’ve got the ongoing advancement of medical care so the potential of quality care is always getting better because medical science is getting better. You’ve got a shrinking number of healthcare providers. Given those trends lines, how do you achieve higher quality of care for everyone at a lower cost?”
So what is the solution? According Wang, telemedicine has an important part to play in answering that question.
“Telemedicine — which is really all about getting the right expertise to the right place at the right time to do the right thing — is one of the cornerstone solutions to the problem,” he argues. “It can be used across a very large number of applications. In some shape or form, telemedicine can be used in any aspect of healthcare delivery at a lower case while driving up quality simultaneously.”
Next month, the ATA Fall Forum will provide the setting for discussing how telemedicine can have a positive effect on reducing healthcare costs while improving patient outcomes and access to quality care in the context of chronic disease management. A telehealth approach to chronic disease, claims Wang, could help address the source of many preventable costs to the healthcare industry.
“Chronic disease patients have a lot of stuff being done to them and thus costing a lot of money,” he observes. “As we transition to being paid for value and keeping a chronic patient well and therefore not consuming as many healthcare resources, that is a fundamentally different payment model.”
In many ways, chronic disease management is a microcosm of a much larger challenge for healthcare organizations and providers that are grappling with transitioning their business models to accommodate these changes in reimbursement. “Change is hard and the healthcare system today is going through a transformation,” adds Wang.
The emphasis on outcomes and wellness in value-based care highlights the need for preventive measures and identifying problems before they escalate into more costly treatments. Preventive care and telemedicine seemingly go hand in hand.
“That is the general idea,” continues Wang. “You link to the person in the home who has a chronic disease with some methodology for gaining accurate data more frequently such that you can more proactively head off negative trend lines that might take longer to happen otherwise.”
Perhaps the real question to ask is this: Why aren’t health systems, hospitals, and physician practices working more aggressively to allow telemedicine support their move to outcomes-based care?

Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Rescooped by Jeri Garner from Learning & Technology News
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How computers change the way we learn

How computers change the way we learn | EHR Intel | Scoop.it

Can technology improve the way we learn and think? Google’s head of research argues we're headed into a new era of education.


Via Nik Peachey
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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, October 31, 2014 6:46 AM

Des applications pour apprendre les langues sont déjà beaucoup utilisées, mais l'article va plus loin.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 8, 2014 11:54 AM

This a conversation dating back to Socrates and others. It is not so much that it changes how we think although it does. The more important point is we remain aware and work with that understanding. How does it impact teaching and learning in the classroom?

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Jeri Garner from EHR and Health IT Consulting
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Looking beyond patient portals to engage patients | Healthcare IT News

Looking beyond patient portals to engage patients | Healthcare IT News | EHR Intel | Scoop.it
With meaningful use Stage 2 underway, many healthcare organizations are pouring significant resources into patient portals in order to engage patients and receive incentives.

Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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David Mattioli's curator insight, October 29, 2014 4:59 PM

Patient portals should enhance patient engagement.  How can we better educate our consumers on how to utilize this tool?

 

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How does patient engagement transform into useful EHR data?

How does patient engagement transform into useful EHR data? | EHR Intel | Scoop.it

Patient engagement represents the next aim of healthcare reform through the adoption of health IT systems and services. It just received a boost from PCORI which awarded $93.5 million for the creation of 29 clinical research data networks that will combine to form its National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet).

 

A major aim of establishing these networks is to enable the patient population to play an active role in how their care is delivered. “One of the reasons people think we should be engaging patients more actively is to make sure that as we do research we’re measuring and assessing the kinds of things they want to know when they’re making medical decisions,” says Elizabeth McGlynn, PhD, Director of the Center for Effectiveness & Safety Research at Kaiser Permanente.


“While we appreciate that more traditional biometric information may be important,” she continues, “there are a number of other things that any of us who have had to make decisions about whether or not to have a surgical procedure or take a particular drug would like to know beyond some of that information.”  McGlynn and her team of researchers will rely on its network, Partners Patient Outcomes Research To Advance Learning (PORTAL), to change how a healthcare organization learns from its patients, namely in bridging the gap between the latter and researchers. “The whole area of engaging patients more actively and comprehensively in research is an evolving one.  
At a high level, the challenges for the project are two-fold. On the one hand, researchers need to be able to understand how patients want to be engaged:
We know that patients aren’t homogenous; we know that there’s a range of opinion. These kinds of tools give us the chance to continue to appreciate the diversity of ideas and opinions and avoid trying to just get to the one or the two leading ideas but really to think. As people are exploring the notion of what personalized medicine means, how do we make sure that we’re eliciting information from people about what’s important to them personally?
 On the other hand, they must tackle the challenge of making this feedback available to clinicians in a meaningful way:
One of our big challenges is finding ways to effectively integrate that information into the electronic health record. We have some work underway right now that’s given us some early insights into what patients are willing to provide if their doctors are going to see it and use it but if it’s just a hypothetical exercise, not so interested.
 more at http://ehrintelligence.com/2014/01/14/how-does-patient-engagement-transform-into-useful-ehr-data/



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Mike Vassel's curator insight, January 15, 2014 1:54 PM

Interesting article.  I believe that a healthy patient is engaged and proactive in their own wellbeing. 

Renzogracie academy's curator insight, January 17, 2014 6:03 AM
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Rescooped by Jeri Garner from EHR Intel
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Will telemedicine help healthcare achieve the triple aim? | EHRintelligence.com

The triple aim is the goal of current healthcare reform through the implementation and adoption of health information technology, but are healthcare organizations and providers overlooking the role of telemedicine in achieving this end?“The country is trying to figure out how you improve the quality of care for everyone and do so at a lower cost,” says Yulun Wang, PhD, President of the American Telemedicine Association Board of Directors and Chairman & CEO of InTouch Health. “There aren’t many ways to do that, to be frank.”The healthcare industry is already facing a difficult challenging in transition from volume to value in terms of reimbursements. Add to that what is down the road and the challenge is exacerbated.“You’ve got an aging population,” Wang explains. “You’ve got the ongoing advancement of medical care so the potential of quality care is always getting better because medical science is getting better. You’ve got a shrinking number of healthcare providers. Given those trends lines, how do you achieve higher quality of care for everyone at a lower cost?”So what is the solution? According Wang, telemedicine has an important part to play in answering that question.“Telemedicine — which is really all about getting the right expertise to the right place at the right time to do the right thing — is one of the cornerstone solutions to the problem,” he argues. “It can be used across a very large number of applications. In some shape or form, telemedicine can be used in any aspect of healthcare delivery at a lower case while driving up quality simultaneously.”Next month, the ATA Fall Forum will provide the setting for discussing how telemedicine can have a positive effect on reducing healthcare costs while improving patient outcomes and access to quality care in the context of chronic disease management. A telehealth approach to chronic disease, claims Wang, could help address the source of many preventable costs to the healthcare industry.“Chronic disease patients have a lot of stuff being done to them and thus costing a lot of money,” he observes. “As we transition to being paid for value and keeping a chronic patient well and therefore not consuming as many healthcare resources, that is a fundamentally different payment model.”In many ways, chronic disease management is a microcosm of a much larger challenge for healthcare organizations and providers that are grappling with transitioning their business models to accommodate these changes in reimbursement. “Change is hard and the healthcare system today is going through a transformation,” adds Wang.The emphasis on outcomes and wellness in value-based care highlights the need for preventive measures and identifying problems before they escalate into more costly treatments. Preventive care and telemedicine seemingly go hand in hand.“That is the general idea,” continues Wang. “You link to the person in the home who has a chronic disease with some methodology for gaining accurate data more frequently such that you can more proactively head off negative trend lines that might take longer to happen otherwise.”Perhaps the real question to ask is this: Why aren’t health systems, hospitals, and physician practices working more aggressively to allow telemedicine support their move to outcomes-based care?
Via Technical Dr. Inc., Jeri Garner
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No comment yet.