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Dealing with technology and teaching a foreign language is an amazing combination to start a new day.
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Self-Directed Learning Well Explained and 27 Actions

Self-Directed Learning Well Explained and 27 Actions | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

TeachThought.com has a series of posts about self-directed learning by Terry Heick and the staff, well worth a read! “

 

“Learning is most effective when it’s personalised; it means something to the learner. That happens when people feel they are participants and investors in their own learning, shaping what and how they learn, and able to articulate its value to them.” — Leadbeater, Charles

 


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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 25, 2013 2:16 PM

It is interesting how few classroom teachers and administrators are aware of what self-directed learning is. SDL is an imperative for our children.

Avery's curator insight, March 25, 2013 11:56 PM

My Thoughts:

You can't teach someone how to learn. You can give them helpful tips and advice, but a single structure for education is not going to work for everyone. It's so much harder for people to learn their true potential, to reach their goals, when they're only shown a single path to them. You show them the path through the forest, but what if there's a rock face nearby that also leads up to where they want to go, and what if they happen to be a fantastic rock climber? It just makes more sense to show someone a map if you can, instead of directing them towards only one path.

THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY's curator insight, March 30, 2013 2:58 PM

“Learning is most effective when it’s personalised; it means something to the learner. That happens when people feel they are participants and investors in their own learning, shaping what and how they learn, and able to articulate its value to them.” — Leadbeater, Charles

 

Famous Self-Taughts (Autodidacts): Leonardo Da Vinci, William Blake, Herb Rits (in addition to Virginia Woolf, Mark Twain, John D. Rockefeller, and many others)

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YOU MUST REMEMBER THIS

YOU MUST REMEMBER THIS | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

 

As I’m beginning to prepare the editorial to be published next week (now this week), it suddenly dawns on me that I’m one year older. One year added to other fifty years I've already had is, to a certain extent, a heavy burden. To a certain extent only: I’m appreciative of the fact that I’m still fully active professionally. I’m grateful to the warmth I get from friends, relatives and colleagues. Picture that: I don’t even have a FACEBOOK page and a most dear friend left a birthday message for me there! What else can one expect from life?

 

It also occurs to me that none of these Happy Birthday exchanges would've been possible if it were not for the fact that we (at some point in our evolution) have developed this most precious communicative Tool which we call language. And for some of us, language teachers, this has become part and parcel of our bread-winning profession and a most convenient analytical tool. It’s analytical in the sense that we are constantly dividing language up into smaller parts or basic principles in order to make it more digestible to learners.

 

The difficulty of working with SPEAKING as a skill is partly related to that: we need to teach language ”in bits and pieces” while we expect our students’ final output to be as close to the “whole” as possible. Teachers often get disappointed with the “whole”. The process of carefully monitoring at least one SPEAKING per class and giving students useful feedback on the gap that exists between their inter-language and the language spoken by a native speaker is an issue that concerns us all.

 

To a certain extent, proficient users of a foreign language are ex-students who, having seen their teachers’ ability to give feedback on their language output, learnt to monitor their own production. Remember: Our ultimate aim as teachers is to help our students become independent learners as quickly as possible. As it all starts with ourselves, an assumption behind what I’ve been saying is that, teachers need to be able to monitor their own SPEAKING efficiently before they can be of assistance to their students. A
simple awareness raising task is to imagine ourselves having a conversation with a native speaker and asking ourselves: How does his/her language differ from mine? How does my choice of vocabulary differ from theirs? Is anything he/she says an idiosyncratic choice?

 

How do you translate that into a “classroom activity”? Here’s a simple, but hopefully effective example: If I listen to the Following on YouTube talking about the first time they’ve kissed:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWfJxYcJ_PU

 

I realize that in similar situations, certain language chunks would never be actively
part of our students’ advanced language output, and yet they should. They would include:

 

“There wasn’t much to it.” (To indicate that something was not terribly interesting.)

 

“Who was it with? Do you remember?” (Split questions – much closer to “real English”.)

 

“How would you rate (that) from 01 to 10? 10 being the best.” (This particular use of the gerund.)

 

“She started wanting to see me more often than I wanted to.” (This particular use of start + the gerund of the verb “want”.)

 

“Just go for it.” (To encourage someone.)

 

“It wasn’t a long kiss. It was more of a peck.” (This particular type of comparison.)

 

These are just some of the language chunks that I would like to see included in my students’ active repertoire - however simple they may seem. Initially, what I would like them to do is to become aware of how their language differs from their American counterparts’. How do I do that? By simply showing them what they don’t do with language.

 

This type of awareness-raising exercise should be part of our everyday practice, but
unfortunately it rarely happens. My assumption is that until we, teachers, start stretching ourselves, we won’t be ready to help our students – not to speak for real.


Via Guilherme Pacheco
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Great Pinterest Tips for Students

Great Pinterest Tips for Students | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

Pinterest is a promising visual bookmarking platform. It is gaining in popularity more and more and of course teachers and educators are part of this success for there are now a burgeoning number of  educational boards on Pinterest where you can get free access to tons of web tools and teaching tips.There are also some great educational Pinners that are  committed to sharing useful resources with their fellow teachers. In this regard, Educational Technology and Mobile Learning has its own Pinterest Board where we have been pinning everything we publish here or we find in other blogs and websites, make sure to follow us to stay updated about our future pinnings.


Via Andrea Zeitz, Les Howard, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, May 15, 2013 5:07 PM

Some great ways to use Pinterest.

Yahya Qachach's curator insight, May 18, 2013 5:53 AM

websocialmedianetworks

Yahya Qachach's curator insight, May 18, 2013 5:55 AM

websocialmedianetworks

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Ten Creative and Fun Ideas with LEGO

Ten Creative and Fun Ideas with LEGO | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

Via BookChook, nicolaperry, Juan Alberto L Uribe
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nicolaperry's curator insight, January 15, 2013 8:47 AM

I love LEGO!

nicolaperry's comment, January 15, 2013 8:49 AM
... and not just for kids!
BookChook's comment, January 15, 2013 4:33 PM
You got it!
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e-Learning Acupuncture: Don't Blink: Copyright Law is Changing in ...

e-Learning Acupuncture: Don't Blink: Copyright Law is Changing in ... | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
e-Learning Acupuncture. Eric's ramblings, experiences and random thoughts about e-Learning, distance education and Educational Technology. Tuesday, June 19, 2012. Don't Blink: Copyright Law is Changing in Canada.
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Week 3: Should Schools be Required to Teach Digital Citizenship ...

Week 3: Should Schools be Required to Teach Digital Citizenship ... | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
It is the teachers responsibility to learn what students are excited about in technology and find creative ways to use those in the classroom (or at learst relate to that technology somehow). Sarah Kessler shows 8 very real ways that ...
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Recognising learning with badges - Pontydysgu – Bridge to ...

Recognising learning with badges - Pontydysgu – Bridge to ... | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
The European Commission Directorate General Information Society and Media, which has funded many large scale research projects in Technology Enhanced Learning over the past ten years is to be renamed DG Connect.
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Washington eLearning Community - elearn.wa: Assessment: What ...

Assessment: What has it done for you (and your students) lately? · A short-and-sweet overview of classroom assessment basics. · How assessment improves teaching and learning. · Thinking in terms of cognitive, psychomotor ...
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'…it's better to burn out than to fade away' – has higher education ...

'…it's better to burn out than to fade away' – has higher education ... | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
There are thousands of individual projects, cross-institutional and even international looking at elements of the relationship between technology and higher education, but very little to suggest that e-learning and technology is the predominant...
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E-learning-an effective tool for easy learning

E-learning-an effective tool for easy learning | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
Learning Becomes Easy with e-learning Applications. The quest for knowledge has finally found its match in technology. Just like this insatiable and ever-increasing desire to learn more, technology also knows no finitude and marches on with aplomb.
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The UPTAKE for E-learning English

The UPTAKE for E-learning English | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

There are several technologies for language teaching, one of them, is what we call CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning). CALL is not a method of teaching material but a tool developed along with the textbook, to speed our students' learning.

We can find materials related to CALL in several textbooks that we have available in several bookstores and on our day-by-day travels around the world. These materials can be; learning games that teach our pupils the language being studied, with audio CDs to be used on their homes; DVDs that bring as many material as video programs that we and our students can use on the computer.

So as we can use these materials at home, we can also use them in the classroom, if we have adequate equipment to make our classes more attractive to our students, of course. What will really count right now is the teachers' creativity on how to the material can be used with the students.

To make the material properly used it is necessary that, both the student and the teacher are quick on the UPTAKE of the solution being used. When the solution is well used, we find a better student performance and increased motivation to perform the task. But what is uptake?

To define UPTAKE, we will resume some of the points made by Morandi (2002, p. 47-58). The first point made was aptitude, we know that today, all our students within an age group of 8-18 have an aptitude for new technologies. This 'facility' for the technologies can provide a motivational factor for students, which in turn can take the attitude of virtually perform the activity.

The students who are extrovert, as told by Morandi (2002, p.47-58), have more aptitude for oral and group activities, with the help of virtual tools, can further develop reading and writing activities. There are also shy students whose skills are more active for quiet reading and writing, oral communication can now work with tools for audio recording and playback of voice, or hearing and oralism.
We find no need to mention the factors of self-esteem, anxiety and willingness to risk, since the interaction student-machine-student breaks up with these paradigms, since we know that this interaction between the machine and the students is much more active than the other activities performed by them before. This interaction is also a facilitator in the case of the student sensitive to rejection.
The "Empathy" which is the ability to share feelings and emotions with others, has now become "techno empathy", ie the ability to share their own feelings and emotions with other people through MSN.
Then we'll see how we can use the internet and VLEs (virtual learning environments), have to offer us teachers and our students, what to do with these technologies and how to use them in class. Take your time and think about it. See you next time for our next E-briefing.

 

MORANDI, Julio Carlos. (2003) As Diferenças Individuais e a aprendizagem de Língua Estrangeira por Alunos Adultos em Idade Avançada. Porto Alegre: Universidade Federal do rio Grande do Sul – UFRGS.

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SCENTS OF WOMEN

SCENTS OF WOMEN | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

 

(This editorial was originally written in 2006 and reflects my love for the cinema. It may be irrelevant for teachers today, but I had lots of fun re-reading it, so I decided to publish it anyway.)

 

I sneaked out of work a tidbit early last Wednesday as I intended to watch PERFUME at 18:20. I needed some “inspiration” to write this week’s editorial and somehow I felt going to the cinema would count as work. Not the hardest of jobs, I admit, but work just the same.

 

PERFUME is a rich film and the memories of the book I read in my twenties lay dormant in the back of my mind. Revisiting a story after so long is like looking at pictures in the family album: we have to fill in the blur with the help of the sight of a wiser beholder. (In case you haven’t got a clue who I’m talking about I explain: ourselves today – yes, repeat after me: “I’m wiser than I was yesterday.”

 

From what I remember, the book was about scents. The film is about survival. The book was about the beauty of language and its limitations when it comes to expressing our innermost feelings. The film is about our obsessions.

 

The little obsessions we pray for on a daily basis: Give us today, our Father, our perfect students, get us to teach our perfect lessons, perfect our knowledge of this foreign language we’ve committed ourselves to teach. (PerFECT, the verb, PERfect, the adjective.)

 

Thank God our Father is not a “mother hen” type-father. Like linguists, he believes in the power of mistakes. He gives us interactive whiteboards to make sure things won’t go 100% right. He enjoys a riddle: when we open up a flipchart, why does media player work in branch X, but not in Y? (And don’t tell me it’s a bug, please.)

And then there’s God’s daughters, the three fate sisters of the Greek Mythology. Cloto the youngest, spun the thread of life in which the bright and the dark light were intermingled. Lachesis twisted it and under her fingers it was sometimes strong, sometimes weak. I forget what the third one did, but something tells me she was the meanest of the three.

 

Who, but them, would dream of forcing a human being to take on a monarchic role in life? After all, being a monarch is about an unnatural state of flawlessness which is hard to conceive: life in the RP lane, I call it. It reminds me of our struggles in the past to speak the so-called Queen’s English? Thank God the ELF movement has changed its minds about the way we look at language itself. But this is obviously not an issue when it comes to THE QUEEN. Helen Mirren and her immaculate performance and her crisp accent are as close as we may ever get to perfection, I suppose. Not that she really cares. Or does she?

 

For linguists like us, the film carries the added interest of hearing the dialogues and noticing the choice of words in the palaces. One memorable line: before going to sleep, Prince Philip turns to YRH (his wife) and says: “Move over, cabbage.” Where else, but in the most inaccessible quarters of Buckingham Palace would this line make sense? (Context, as we know, is everything.)

 

IN TIME: Dame Judi Dench (herself always very comfortable in the role of Queens) has once again been nominated by the Academy Awards for the prize of Best Actress. I haven’t seen NOTES ON A SCANDAL yet, but my vote is already hers. In the rare moments when I’m given the chance to "play Queen" (such as now – when I write), being fair is the least of my worries.


Via Guilherme Pacheco
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AS A WORD OF INTRODUCTION

AS A WORD OF INTRODUCTION | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

I´m new at SCOOP IT. I’m here thanks to the encouragement of a colleague and friend Giselle Santos, who is a fully-fledged curator around here with literally thousands of followers.

 

In case you don’t know me, I've been an English teacher and trainer for 30 years now. (How time flies!)

 

Throughout these years I have seen many trends come and go, have been "forced" to experiment with many difference "methodologies" and have grown a little wiser to know that some things are meant to go, but essential things are here to stay. Basic classroom management skills is one of those things. Discipline is another. I cannot envisage any learning experience in which some (however minimum) amount of discipline is not present. Obviously, I am speaking from a very personal perspective, as I consider myself to be a very disciplined person!

 

I also believe in curiosity. Curiosity did not kill the cat – it may have taken away one of his lives – but he has 7 – he’s got plenty of lives to spare. I strongly believe both teachers and students need to be curious - that's ultimately what makes learning worth-while.

 

In my spare time (LOL) I like to read and I go to the cinema. I also work as a body psychotherapist. I have few patients – as many as I manage to fit in after my office hours, but I do my best to help them become “better” people. Seeing a patient is a little like teaching one-to-one, but going deeper into matters!

 

Currently I work as an Academic Coordinator at CULTURA INGLESA in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. I'm in charge of a number of distance training courses and I'm the editor of the institution’s TEACHERS' PORTAL. Throughout these years, I have written quite a number of editorials, which I intend to share with you here – those which may not have become too dated or may not have lost their relevance.

 

That's me in a nutshell: eager to learn - willing to share.


Via Guilherme Pacheco
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10 Devices You Should Consider Donating To Schools

10 Devices You Should Consider Donating To Schools | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
If you just got a fabulous new device, why not consider giving back by donating to schools? Send that old device to a BYOD classroom near you.

Via Steven Engravalle
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Steven Engravalle's curator insight, January 9, 2013 12:41 PM

Please lend schools a hand by looking into dontating some of the following gadgets and accessories so students may enjoy a fair and equal chance in their studies.

InfuseLearning's curator insight, January 13, 2013 5:55 PM

Agreed! Why does this not happen more!

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ONCE IN A BLOOM MOON

ONCE IN A BLOOM MOON | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

 

I realised it was the full moon while I walked back home from the parking lot last night. When I finally went to bed, I dreamt I was reading a watermelon. I can still picture myself flipping through those watery red pages – and the black seeds. “What juicy story may I have been reading about and not necessarily living?”, I wondered.

There’s nothing black and white about watermelons and dreams.

 

Teaching is not a clear-cut piece of fruit either. Neither is it a piece of cake. I personally never thought it was. Our list of principles and beliefs include: Learning is a multi-dimensional process, involving social, cognitive-linguistic and affective-motivational aspects. (That’s how complex.)

 

Every time we try to pigeonhole education into a uniform format we hurt ourselves and we hurt our students. Language teachers, for instance, simplify linguistic concepts to their students for pedagogical reasons – i.e., to make our lessons more digestible – knowing only too well that what we are teaching them is only temporarily true. When it comes to “Real Life, Real English”, we lie blatantly to our students – for a good reason, I suppose.

 

Bloom had it right: lower order thinking is but a stepping stone to a higher order. In other words, we teach our students to remember, understand, and apply so that they can ultimately analyse, evaluate, and create. That’s also the message behind dream interpretation: unless you can delve into the realms of creation, you won’t be able to decipher dreams. In which case dreams become like sphinges: they have no option but to devour us.

 

Unfortunately Bloom is a has-been. When I mentioned Boom and his taxonomy to recently hired teachers no-one knew who I was talking about. Maybe some of them knew it and were just afraid I might devour them if they gave me the wrong answer. How little do they know about me.

 

Bloom urges teachers to go beyond the black (right) and white (wrong). Or black (wrong) and white (right). (I’ve recently been dazzled by Viola Davis‘s performance in The Help, so right now black is right.) I’m a major fan of elicitation exactly because of that: It’s an open invitation for students to speak – that’s what elicitation is. (But I also know that every time I elicit with a hidden agenda in mind, I run the risk of getting myself frustrated.)

 

When I think of a “dream” lesson, I always envisage a lesson in which I start something off and then I watch my students. And I listen to them. And we take it from there. My lesson plan comes to life when it’s being shared with students.

 

I like the never-ending mystery that underlies human interaction. It doesn’t come easy: It makes me sweat. It makes me jump. At times it makes me shout and it also makes me want to fight. But every now and then I get it right. When that happens, I blame it on the moon.


Via Guilherme Pacheco
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Lucas Rigonato's comment, March 19, 2013 9:27 AM
and here I see another reference to sphinges. Interesting!
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33 more ways to use a mobile phone in the classroom

33 more ways to use a mobile phone in the classroom | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
It says in the classroom but we all know that mobiles are for using on the move and that the majority of learning happens outside of classrooms so take advantage of the good weather (unless you're in Wales) and do something fun!
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Reach - Then Teach: Big Ideas About Technology & Learning: Using ...

Reach - Then Teach: Big Ideas About Technology & Learning: Using ... | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
The money saved on traditional hardware, software, and printing can be reinvested into innovative solutions like tablet computers, e-books, and learning Apps. Increased Network Security. ...
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Social Technology | President's Blog

Social Technology | President's Blog | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
What's more, we're taking strides to incorporate these amazing devices to enhance our instruction, even using social media platforms to help improve communication in classrooms. One step is changes to our e-learning ...
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E-learning has 'numerous benefits' for adult students

E-learning has 'numerous benefits' for adult students | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
eSchool News | Technology News ... Finance, technical and administration director at the Distance Learning Centre Andrew Whitehead pointed out e-learning in adulthood enables people to "change their careers".
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CeLEA - Canadian eLearning Enterprise Alliance - Industry News

CeLEA - Canadian eLearning Enterprise Alliance - Industry News | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it
30 Apr 2012 8:33 PM | B. Nicolle (Administrator) ... Critics of mLearning argue that the use of mobile technologies distracts learners and undermines the traditional classroom setting thereby threatening to make teachers redundant.
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FEATURED TEACHER: Wagner Júnior

FEATURED TEACHER: Wagner Júnior | EFLProfessionals.com | Scoop.it

How long have you been teaching?

 I’ve been doing what I love for a quite long time. I have faced some difficulties along time but all made me a more mature teacher and person.

 

What I love about teaching is:

sharing and practicing shared activities, as well as seeing my students succeeding in reading, speaking and writing.

 

My top tip for digital integration is: http://www.raz-kids.com/

 

Using www.raz-kids.com has been grateful and pleasuring for my students and me. It is quite simple and not only kids like but teens appreciated.
Raz-kids gives you a rich literacy-resource including downloadable books, worksheets, quizzes and assessments. Not only these, but raz-kids can also have your students work independently at home.
Students cannot only listen to the book they select, but also record a video while they read by themselves.
Teachers will be able to assess their students reading later on and give them feedback.

 

1 – The teacher will create a personal account;
2 – He/She will divide their students by groups. Each letter will represent a level for your students;
3 – Assign some interesting reading for your students. Some books are also interesting for teenagers and adults;
4 – Create a password with pictures and give it to students. Each student will have a personal one;
5 – In order to make it easier and more simple for teachers and students, below you will find videos for teachers and students:
5.1 – Teacher detailed directions http://www.raz-kids.com/helpvideo-teacher.html?id=154
5.2 – Student’s detailed instructions http://www.raz-kids.com/helpvideo-teacher.html?id=153

 

------------------------------------------------------------

If you have an interesting idea that integrates technology in class send us and you might be picked Featured Teacher of the Week.

 

Bruno Andrade - bruno.andrade@culturainglesa.net

Giselle Santos - giselle.santos@culturainglesa.net


Via Digital Integration CI
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