EFL Teaching Journal
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Rescooped by Lyudmila Anikina from Eclectic Technology
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The Most Important Skill for Science or Self-Improvement

The Most Important Skill for Science or Self-Improvement | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it
If I could ensure that kids come away from science class with one thing only, it wouldn’t be a set of facts. It would be an attitude—something that the late physicist Richard Feynman called “scientific integrity,” the willingness to bend over backward to examine reasons your pet theories about the...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 3, 2015 7:45 PM

Have you heard about the concept of a paradigm shift? This happens when new information comes in that does not fit what we expected. Unfortunately in many cases we choose not to see this lack of fit, and ignore the information. This post looks at this type of issue but suggests that you have students look it as "surprises" and notes that "we need to actively look for signs that our assumptions are wrong..."

How can we do this? Try creating a "Surprise Journal" with your students. Based on one teacher who has done this consider having your students (and you) look for moments of "surprise." Have them respond to two questions:

* Why was this surprising?

* And what does that tell me about myself?

This teacher has collected over 1,000 moments of surprise and shares a few of them in this post.

Here is his statement about how it changed his classroom culture (quoted from the post):

“In the class culture, acknowledgement that you are mistaken about something has become dubbed a ‘moment of surprise’ (followed by a student scrambling to retrieve their journal to record it),” he wrote to me. “As this is much more value-neutral than ‘I screwed up,’ the atmosphere surrounding the topic is less stressful than in previous years.”

Rescooped by Lyudmila Anikina from Recursos Online
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Top YouTube Channels for Science and Math Teachers and Students

Top YouTube Channels for Science and Math Teachers and Students | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it
Below is a round-up of some wonderful educational YouTube channels for Math and Science teachers. These channels are taken from a long list that comprises more than 170 YouTube channels. Please share...

Via Maria Margarida Correia
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Rescooped by Lyudmila Anikina from Eclectic Technology
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Infoviz Education: Animated Visualizations for Kids

Infoviz Education: Animated Visualizations for Kids | EFL Teaching Journal | Scoop.it

"We love infographics. We love animation. And we’re all for engaging kids in creative education. So today we’re looking at three educational infoviz animations that shed light on complex or important issues in beautifully art-directed ways that make little eyes widen and little brains broaden."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:55 PM

If you are looking for three great infographics that are animated this post is for you.

The first video is 'How to Feed the World' and explores "the science behind eating and why nutrition is important." The suggested ages are 9 - 14.

The second video, 'The Story of Stuff' is a fascinating look at "the entire materials economy." This is a longer video (just over 20 minutes) but it provide a great base for a classroom discussion. If you  click  through to their website you will find many other videos that have been created including 'Story of Bottled Water', 'The Story of Solutions' and 'Story of Electronics.'

The third video is 'Meet the Elements,' a "wonderful animated journey across the periodic table."

There is a fourth video but it is not necessarily appropriate for students (at least younger students). This one is a reinterpretation of LIttle Red Riding Hood.

If you know of some great videos for teachers to use share them by leaving a comment!

Rescooped by Lyudmila Anikina from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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Ordinary skin cells morphed into functional brain cells

Scientists at CWRU School of Medicine discover new technique that holds promise for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy.

 

Researchers at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine have discovered a technique that directly converts skin cells to the type of brain cells destroyed in patients with multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy and other so-called myelin disorders.

 

This discovery appears today in the journal Nature Biotechnology ("Transcription factor–mediated reprogramming of fibroblasts to expandable, myelinogenic oligodendrocyte progenitor cells").This breakthrough now enables "on demand" production of myelinating cells, which provide a vital sheath of insulation that protects neurons and enables the delivery of brain impulses to the rest of the body.

 

In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebral palsy (CP), and rare genetic disorders called leukodystrophies, myelinating cells are destroyed and cannot be replaced.



Via Gust MEES
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