Effects of Migration on Canadian Development
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Effects of Migration on Canadian Development
How did foreign immigrants shape Canada's development? Find out here!
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Chinese Challenges

Early on in Canada's history, Chinese workers were brought in to do the harsh bidding of the Canadian Pacific Railway work, owned and operated by the white man. These people worked hard, many dying, hoping that when this was over, they'd be able to stay and earn more for their families. Only, they didn't. The Canadian government forced out the Chinese immigrants, for fear that they would overwhelm the Caucasian populations and take all the jobs. They were discriminated against, loathed by the dominant population at the time. The Canadian government had placed head taxes on each Chinese immigrant, effectively reducing the immigration rate that trickled still into Canadian territory. Finally, in 1923, the government passed the Chinese Immigration Act, banning further Chinese immigration into China (except for a select few). The Act was not repealed until 1947.

Today, though, the Chinese are one of the most abundant and successful races in Canada, adding diversity in the markets and bringing about a different perspective and intelligence to the table. They have continued in helping develop the nation of Canada, helping to expand its techonology and economy. What other ethnicity might dominate in the Western World?

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Immigration crucial to economic well-being | Y-Axis Canada Blog

Immigration crucial to economic well-being | Y-Axis Canada Blog | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

"Nanaimo may be a unique part of Canada for its weather, geography and culture, but we share one thing with the rest of the country – the need for more skilled immigrants.

Long before this week’s census data showed a shrinking workforce due to increasing retirements, it was known that Canada must turn to immigration as a key solution to maintaining a pool of workers that will keep us competitive within the global economy."

Read more at: http://canadablog.y-axis.com/?p=2420

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Immigrants aren't the only ones with responsibilities - Globe and Mail

Immigrants aren't the only ones with responsibilities - Globe and Mail | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

"Immigrants are more than bodies and minds imported to solve short-term economic imperatives. First and foremost, they are people whose successful integration into the social, cultural and political realms of Canadian society, along with its economic sector, is of critical importance... Integrating into the labour force is only part of the picture. People everywhere have an innate need for connection, belonging and a sense of welcome no matter where life’s lottery assigned their birthplace. True, some of these needs are satisfied by meaningful work, but life is much more than a job or career... The fact is, Canada naturalizes a far higher percentage of immigrants than any other country on Earth, with roughly 85 per cent of those eligible eventually becoming Canadian citizens... Immigrants are an essential, undeniable and significant piece of the Canadian puzzle. Yet all Canadians – whether born here, naturalized citizens or recently arrived newcomers – have a stake in Canada’s success."

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The Immigrant Answer - Globe and Mail

The Immigrant Answer - Globe and Mail | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

What would a Canada of 100 million feel like? Much like today’s Canada, but more comfortable, better-served and better defended against ecological and human threats. It would turn our major cities into places of intense and world-leading culture – and it would greatly improve their quality of life, as they’d finally have a critical mass of ratepayers large enough to support top-quality public transit, parks, museums, universities and property developments. It would put an end to the low population density that plagues large sections of Toronto and Calgary. It would turn the less-large cities, including Edmonton, Regina and Ottawa, into truly important centres.

The challenge is not simply economic. The greatest price of underpopulation is loneliness: We are often unable to talk intelligently to each other, not to mention the world, because we just don’t have enough people to support the institutions of dialogue and culture – whether they’re universities, magazines, movie industries, think tanks or publishing houses. Unlike the tightly packed countries of Europe, Canada has multiple, dispersed audiences with different regional cultures – and therefore needs a larger base population, especially in its cities.

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Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 – Strengthening Provincial ...

Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 – Strengthening Provincial ... | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it
Economic Growth and fill the requirement of workers in Country's labor market – are two most important factors, dominated Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 - where several proposals came into lime light to reform ...
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Chinese immigration: Not welcome anymore

Chinese immigration: Not welcome anymore | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

"The Chinese were instrumental in building Canada's railway, but were no longer welcome after it was done." Said well and said true, the Chinese weren't welcome in Canada after the Canadian Pacific Railway was finished. Why, you ask? The Caucasian population felt threatened by this new population of unfamiliar faces.  However, the Chinese prevailed through the head tax and immigration policies to what they are today; a huge percentage of the whole immigration population.

 

Click the link for more on this topic!

http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/society/immigration/chinese-immigration-to-canada-a-tale-of-perseverance/not-welcome-anymore.html

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Why move to Canada? | Suzanne Ma Online

Why move to Canada? | Suzanne Ma Online | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

Some interesting points of view on current immigration to Canada.

A recent Globe and Mail article quotes a Chinese immigrant to Canada who has chosen to return to Shanghai after graduating from a Toronto university. “In Canada, you have a good standard of living, but you can't make big money."

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Lessons from Canada on skilled migration - The Drum Opinion (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Lessons from Canada on skilled migration - The Drum Opinion (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

"The main reason for this protectionist sentiment is the counterintuitive nature of economics. Economics is not a sporting event; in most cases there are not winners and losers. The beauty of exchange, in any capacity, is that it is creative, whether it be economic-, cultural- or knowledge-based. The more it occurs, the larger it grows...

On the contrary, insularity reduces the ability to create, and diminishes diversity, innovation and progress. This is why economic nationalism is a highly conservative idea. It is designed to favour "us" over "them", but it actually favours no-one, and inhibits both technological and social advancement...

When we start to worry about the origins of workers, we cut ourselves off from having the best and brightest. In order to succeed in producing quality, we need to be open to quality, from wherever it originates."

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Canada's aging boomers place new strain on pensions, health care: Census - National Post

Canada's aging boomers place new strain on pensions, health care: Census - National Post | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

"Among the controversial policy changes now underway: future Old Age Security pension system costs are being curtailed by making seniors wait until 67 to get their benefits; health-care transfers to provinces are being cut back; immigration rules are being changed to get more skilled workers into the labor force [to support the pension and old age peoples]."

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Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants

Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

It is predicted that within the next 10 years, there will be a large wanting for skilled workers all over Canada. How will we get them? Immigrants. Unless Canadians today start having dramtically larger families, we may not be able to fill in the gaps without them. Not only will immigrants benefit the companies they work for, but they will be paying taxes, spending on homes, transportation and consumer goods. Already, our country is started to realize the benefits of the Provincial Nominee Program, in which companies can guarantee jobs for them based on the company's needs and the potential immigrant's skills. They look for people who are ready to learn new skills and languages. For example, Alberta Oilsands Inc. is "voraciously eating up all the skilled labour it can find and hungers for more." Labour shortages will be a problem in the near future for Alberta. Temporary foreign workers are not only helping to improve Canada's infrastructure and economy, but to improve their own financial problems. A worker from Brackley, England said that there are few jobs around there and that they are being paid well in Alberta, improving their quality of life.

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Flow-On Effects of Immigration

For years, people of diverse ethnic backgrounds have been immigrating to Canada. Starting with Caucasian people born in Europe in the early years of Confederation, to the release of the Immigration Act upon Chinese immigrants. Immigration has increased signifcantly since 1961. Before 1961, 90.5% of immigrants came from Europe. But as recorded in the census of 2006, the most prominent immigrant group in Canada was those from Asia. Around us today, especially in Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area, you can see the effects of immigration on our economy. The immigration of many different ethnic groups established a greater selection of ethnic and cultural food, as well as more exposure to different languages, and making products from around the world readily accessible to people today. Just walking down the streets you can see various Asian grocery stores, Chinese fast-food restaurants and Indian restaurants. Ethnic economic opportunities have become a mainstream thing, because businesses have begun to realize the benefits of accomodating and trying the cultures of other's races. The sheer abundance of people of different ethnicities has opened Canada's economic bounds relentlessly, and is only set to grow.

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Mark Lievonen: Sowing the seeds of curiosity to grow Canada's bio-economy - Vancouver Sun

Mark Lievonen: Sowing the seeds of curiosity to grow Canada's bio-economy - Vancouver Sun | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it
Mark Lievonen: Sowing the seeds of curiosity to grow Canada's bio-economyVancouver SunIn 2005, The Scientist magazine ranked UBC the first in Canada, and ninth in North America, for producing high-quality patentable research. Thirdly, government must provide more direct incentives to start-ups and improve immigration policies. We are moving in the right direction with the latest federal budget including more direct incentives to help keep biotech companies in Canada.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/2035/Mark+Lievonen+Sowing+seeds+curiosity+grow+Canada+economy/6655988/story.html#ixzz1vjZb1V3B

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Canada ready to open its doors to more immigrants, Kenney says ...

Canada ready to open its doors to more immigrants, Kenney says ... | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

"The Globe has called for Canada to double its level of economic migration, pushing its total immigration to 400,000 new permanent residents a year. Such a move would make the country’s population younger, more innovative and better placed to address future labour needs, many experts say."

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Charting a new course for forestry - Vancouver Sun

Charting a new course for forestry - Vancouver Sun | Effects of Migration on Canadian Development | Scoop.it

"The third goal relates to "people" and a desire to hire at least 60,000 new recruits including women, aboriginals and immigrants. After a decade of decline in the workforce, the Canadian forest products industry is now recruiting and offering solid careers for those with the skills, knowledge and desire to work in the sector. We need to find new ways to attract and retain young workers and also further reach out to female and first nations employees. The immigration system needs to address the demand for skilled workers and tradespeople. There is a pressing need for traditional skills such as millwrights and electricians but as the industry transforms, it will also need technologists, chemical engineers, innovators and more."

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/Charting+course+forestry/6642955/story.html#ixzz1vLQtNyms

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