EDUP3008 Creative Arts Reflections
121 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 1: Media Arts and Film

Tropfest Jr. film watched in the lecture. 

Laura Griffiths's insight:

The introductory lecture provided insight on media arts and its connection with film. This was established from watching films showcasing the importance of story, shot types and the use of time. Film is a format that students are familiar with, are interested in and will be excited to explore and take part in creating. Using film competitions like Tropfest Jr. provides students a direction and purpose for creating a film and for teachers, a means for assessment and an effective method for supporting student reflection on their learning (Genereux & Thompson, 2008, p. 25). As film has the ability to communicate any subject matter, teachers can then use the film making process as a method for students to express content and knowledge from all key learning areas. As a future primary teacher, it is important to acknowledge how media arts can be integrated into KLAs. By using guidelines and scaffolding from student film competitions like Tropfest Jr. further provides direction on how students can create films from content being studied in the classroom.

 

Reference

Genereux, A., & Thompson, W. (2008). Lights, camera, reflection! Digital movies: A tool for reflective learning. "Journal of College Science Teaching", 37, 21-25. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 3: Production

Reflection 3: Production | EDUP3008 Creative Arts Reflections | Scoop.it

Images are stills from our group film "Who Will I Be Today?"

Laura Griffiths's insight:

The production phase of film making involves using video cameras to capture footage to represent the narrative expressed on the storyboard. This phase does not just concentrate on the acting as students when filming should be analysing the production from an audience and viewer perspective by stepping outside the performance aspect ensuring that the space, movement and environment are communicating the desired effects  (Ewing & Simon, 2011, p. 120). While filming there was constant consideration of implementing interesting shot types, placement of props and meaningful use of costumes.  Furthermore the camera had to be capturing or creating dynamic movement whether it was something moving in the shot or the camera itself moving through the use of panning, tilting or zooming. For future classroom implementation it is important that students receive a lesson on how to use the camera appropriately. Students should first be given the opportunity to experiment with different shot types and camera angles. This could be achieved through scaffolding an activity where students use specific shot types and angles to capture locations or student emotions. By having students collaboratively trial with the camera, helps prepare the students to undertake filming their story. Furthermore it would make the production phase more time effective as well as give students confidence in capturing footage with the video camera. 

 

Ewing, R., & Simons, J. (2011). "Beyond the script: Drama in the classroom, take two". Newtown: PETA. 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 5: Playing Music

Rendition of Sansa Kroma showing how different percussion instruments are playing different sections within the one song. 

Laura Griffiths's insight:

Playing musical instruments is an essential part of music. This is outlined within the creative arts syllabus as teachers must ensure that students can perform music of different styles, from different times and different cultures through playing and using musical concepts (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 8). However, a concern that is faced in music lessons involving playing instruments is catering for different student capabilities in the classroom. Therefore it is important teachers have strategies to ensure both students with music foundations and students with limited playing exposure can both have engaging and challenging music lessons. Using tune percussion instruments like glockenspiels and xylophones provide a platform which can cater for differing student capabilities. Tuned percussion instruments can incorporate melodic direction, allows for improvised note choices and develops understanding of notation (Fidyk, 2008). Accompanying these instruments with musical pieces that can be divided into various playing sections enabling students to perform and play in accordance to their music ability and needs. This approach to teaching students to play instruments is something I can use in my future teaching practice.

 

Reference:

Fidyk, S. (2008) "Getting students started with pitched percussion. Teaching Music", 15, 48 – 49.  

 

NSW Board of Studies (2006). "Creative arts K-6 syllabus".Sydney: Author. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 7: Listening to Music

Classic piece taken from Orff Schulwerk Volume 1: Musica Poetica. 

Laura Griffiths's insight:

Listening and appreciating music enables students to interpret musical pieces and understand how the five musical concepts of duration, structure, pitch, dynamics and tone colour are embedded. According to Espeland (1987, p. 294) appreciating and listening involves enjoyment, understanding, recognition, valuation, communication and responsiveness to musical pieces. A piece of music that students could analyse  in the classroom is Carl Orff’s ‘Gassenhauer’.

 

Musical Concepts found within "Gassenhauer":

1. Duration: The tempo of the piece is quite consistent with the same beat being continued throughout.

2. Structure: The theme is repeated 8 times. Each theme is constructed from 24 beats.

3. Pitch: Layers of pitch found within the music as some instruments are playing at a lower pitch and other percussion are playing at a higher pitch. This helps create the texture of the piece. 

4. Dynamics: The piece starts off softly with only one instrument playing and gradually becomes louder as more percussion instruments are introduced.

5. Tone Colour: Percussion instrumentation are heard within the piece including xylophones and drums. The piece starts off with one instrument and gradually more are added so the piece is building. These layers on top of one another are creating a thickening of texture.

 

The teacher knowledge of how a musical piece expresses the five musical concepts enables questions to be created that students can reflect upon when listening to the piece. It is also important to create questions where students can create personal connections with the piece. This is helping students to understand the expressive quality of the music.  

 

Questions:  

1. What family of instruments are featured in this piece?

2. Can you name some of the instruments you believe create this piece?

4. Describe the dynamics of the piece?

5. What words would you use to describe this piece?

6. What do you imagine when listening to the music?

 

Appreciating and listening to the music can be enhanced through follow up activities such as students producing a creative writing piece, painting a picture or performing a dance inspired by and representing the music. 

 

Reference:

Espeland, M. (1987). Music in use: Responsive music listening in the primary school. "British Journal of Music Education", 4, 283 - 297.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 10: Dynamic Movement and Connecting Dance

Using dynamic movements and the elements of dance to explore the concept of 'greetings'. 

 

Laura Griffiths's insight:

Dance has the ability for students to express their learning in a dynamic, engaging and collaborative method. This was discovered through the use of greetings in the tutorial as it allowed for creative representation of this notion through using criteria covering the dynamic elements of dance. Using a broad topic like greetings allows students to interpret and represent this notion in numerous ways. Furthermore, students can use their diverse backgrounds to create dynamic and interesting sequences to express the topic. Though the initial dance focus should be on exploring the elements of dance, it should eventuate into expressing extended topics, content and themes (Gibson & Ewing, 2011, p.40). From this tutorial and concept I can understand the potential dance has to express a variety of topics, content, abstract and concrete ideas. For future teaching this allows me to devise connections dance can have with other key learning areas. For example dance can be used to express the stages of a life cycle in science or the concept of inclusion for PDHPE. Through scaffolding the tasks, it then enables students to concentrate on representing ideas using specific elements of dance like dynamic movement which can involve qualities that are sudden, direct, sustained, indirect, light and heavy.

 

Reference:

Gibson, R., & Ewing, R. (2011). "Transforming the curriculum through the arts". South Yarra: Palgrave Macmillan. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 12: Dance and Literacy

Reflection 12: Dance and Literacy | EDUP3008 Creative Arts Reflections | Scoop.it
Laura Griffiths's insight:

Literacy can be embedded throughout all key learning areas in primary school. Dance is no exception and this creative art strand enables literacy to be creatively expressed. According to Birch, dance can be seen as a tool to break down literacy boundaries as it enables students to represent the written form physically and engagingly (2008, p. 226). The tutorial focused on "Henry and Amy" as the stimulus, where dance and literacy were combined in each activity. Activities included focusing on words found within the book which created partner and group activities, exploring the themes of the book and composing dances in groups surrounding and extending the themes. Many picture books have the ability to incorporate dance with their literacy features. "The Night Shimmy" by Gwen Strauss and Anthony Browne is a picture book suitable for stage 1 and 2 students with themes and literary features that can be enhanced, expressed and learnt through dance. The above mind map shows the different dance activities that encompass literacy. Teachers in the classroom have the ability to choose picture books and extend student literacy learning through activities involving dance.

 

Reference:

Birch, J. (2008). Expanding literacy and integrating curricula through dance. “The Educational Forum”, 64 (3), 223 – 228.

 

Strauss, G., & Browne, A. (1991) The night shimmy. London: Picture Corgi.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 2: Film Narrative

Reflection 2: Film Narrative | EDUP3008 Creative Arts Reflections | Scoop.it
Laura Griffiths's insight:

Preparation to create a film occurs during the pre-production phase where scriptwriting, storyboarding and sketching takes place. Within this stage, there was a strong focus on developing the film narrative. When creating the film's story line, there is an emphasis on encompassing the key concepts of film making including representation, language, technologies, audience and institutions (ACARA, 2013, p. 84). As teachers, it is important to visually show students how to plan the film’s narrative. “The Visual Portrait of A Story” (Ohler, 2003) graphically provides a plan on how a film’s narrative can be constructed. It allows students to understand that film narratives incorporate an introduction, context, state of affairs, critical event, emotional responses, complicating actions and an outcome. A strategy teachers can use in classrooms to introduce this concept is to watch a short film and have students discuss and label on the “Portrait of A Story” how the film encompassed these elements of the narrative. From here, teachers can introduce how film techniques were used to capture those events and actions within the story.

 

Reference:

ACARA (2013). Revised draft Australian curriculum: The arts foundation to year 10. Retrieved May 28, 2014, from  http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/Draft_Arts_Curriculum_22_February_2013.pdf

 

Ohler, J. (2003). Visual portrait of a story. Retrieved March 16, 2014, from http://www.jasonohler.com/pdfs/VPS.pdf

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 4: Post Production

Reflection 4: Post Production | EDUP3008 Creative Arts Reflections | Scoop.it

Editing shots of our film "Who Will I Be Today?"

Laura Griffiths's insight:

The aim of the post production phase is turning the captured footage into a sequential film first created in the storyboard. Editing is the main component in this stage and is a process where the elements of moving images including the shots, sounds and music are placed together to produce a coherent and engaging film. This is a collaborative process for students as decisions are made surrounding what takes worked best, what music will convey emotion and what transitions should be used between shots. Students’ engaging in this thinking process means they are viewing the material critically and are considering how images and sounds can be manipulated to create meaning for the audience (Bfi Education, 2003, p.31). Having students watch and analyse various films will develop awareness on how the editing process influences the audience's emotions and attitude to the content on the screen.

 

Reference:

Bfi. (2003) ."Look again!  A teaching guide to using film and television with three to eleven year olds". London: Author.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 6: Singing

Song learnt in this weeks tutorial

Laura Griffiths's insight:

Singing is a component of music and involves more than singing lyrics from a page. There should be incorporation of recognising correct posture, breathing, pitch and rhythmic accuracy, articulation, tone and stylistic quality. Many students while singing can feel self conscious and try to hide their voice , leading them to sing about a fourth below the pitch of others (Lyon, 1993, p.21). While it is important to introduce these elements to singing, it should also be about making the class’ singing interesting and dynamic. This can be achieved by creating harmony, rounds or singing two different songs together. Teaching students songs can be very teacher directed; therefore it is also important to make singing a collaborative process with the students. Teachers could ask students to create dance sequences to accompany the singing or to discover and choose what instruments could enhance the singing performance. These strategies would be appropriate when approaching singing and can be utilised in my future teaching. Furthermore, I could also choose songs that students would be excited to sing. Some suggested songs could be recent appropriate music they hear on the radio and songs from movies their familiar with. Asking students to choose songs would be another way to involve students in these music lessons.

 

Reference:

Lyon, J. (1993). Teaching all students to sing on pitch. “Music Educators Journal”, 80 (2), 20-23.  

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 8: Connecting Music

Reflection 8: Connecting Music | EDUP3008 Creative Arts Reflections | Scoop.it

A mind-map created to show how music can be connected and applied in all key learning areas across all stages in the primary curriculum. 

Laura Griffiths's insight:

As primary teachers it is important and effective to connect key learning areas with each other. For students, it allows them to see connection between topics and to draw on and apply learning from different subject areas. Creating the mind map above provided awareness of how music can be incorporated in all key learning areas in the primary curriculum. It was also interesting to discover how music is mentioned in various outcomes, indicators and content descriptors across the syllabuses. Examples can be seen in science where students in early stage 1 “design and make a simple musical instrument and experiments with the sound produced” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 26) and in HSIE where stage 3 students “identify examples of Australian culture including music as an example” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p.27). Incorporating music with other subjects will allow students to approach music from different and new perspectives. It will also provide new methods of using, performing and understanding music.  

 

Reference:

NSW Board of Studies. (2006). "Human society &  its environment K-6: Syllabus". Sydney: Author. 

 

NSW Board of Studies. (2006). "Science and technology K-6: Outcomes and indicators". Sydney: Author. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 9: Dance and the Body

Dance performance showing how the body can move creatively within a performance.  

Laura Griffiths's insight:

The body can be considered an instrument as through dance the body creates movements to express, convey and perform. Within the classroom and creative arts, dance is defined as analysing thoughts and feelings though our bodies and turning this analysis into action (Blumenfield-Jones, 2008). For students, the body within dance involves the performance skills of strength, coordination, balance, flexibility and stamina. As a teacher it is important that the activities and tasks we create incorporate these components and allows students to develop these skills using their bodies. Students also need to develop and recognise how their bodies move and interact in dance. Using warm up activities like following the leader provides students with the chance to improvise movements using their bodies. Teachers can use activities like this to target particular body parts, allowing students to explore how they can manipulate their body in dance.  Using actions like travelling, turning, jumping and stillness can allow students to focus on how their bodies can interpret and create these movements.

 

Reference:

Blumenfield-Jones, D. (2008) Dance, choreography, and social science research. In J.G. Knowles & A. L. Cole (eds). Handbook of the arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues (pp. 175 – 184).Los Angeles: Sage. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Griffiths
Scoop.it!

Reflection 11: Space and Dance

Reflection 11: Space and Dance | EDUP3008 Creative Arts Reflections | Scoop.it

Stimulus used in the tutorial for students to create lesson activities primary students could undertake in the classroom involving the idea of space. 

Laura Griffiths's insight:

Space within dance is more than organising students into formation for a performance. It involves pathways, personal and general space, direction, levels and dimensions. Teachers need to create activities where students can explore these elements with their body. Providing a stimulus offers students the opportunity to creatively compose dance sequences that can focus on space. Stimuli can be any form from creative items including sculptures, painting, poems, every day objects or just a texture or colour; however they must allow and help students explore their creative thinking in relation to dance and its elements (Morgan, 2004, p. 19). For a teacher, choosing the stimulus means that they can cater their activity to specific year levels, scaffold the lesson to focus on or include specific components of space or let the students discover how to use the stimulus themselves.  Having students interpret the stimulus individually in relation to space means the sequences can relate to partnerships, pathways of movement, levels, or direction.

 

Reference:

Morgan, R. (2004). Improvisation: Another way to move and dance. "Strategies", 18 (2), 19 – 20. 

more...
No comment yet.