EDUP3002 Care of Resources
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EDUP3002 Care of Resources
HSIE
Stage 1

Outcome: ENS1.6 Demonstrates an understanding of the relationship between environments and people.

Subject Matter: Care of resources, including waste disposal
Curated by Gloria Chan
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References

References | EDUP3002 Care of Resources | Scoop.it
Gloria Chan's insight:

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J. & Lowrie, T. (2009).  Mathematics for children: Challenging children to think mathematically (3rd edition). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Education Australia.

 

CAST. 2012. National Center On Universal Design for Learning. At CAST. Retrieved on 10th April 2013 from http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/whatisudl

 

Gibson, R. & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillian

 

Gillies, R. M. (2007). Cooperative Learning: Integrating theory and practices. Los Angeles, Calif. SAGE Publications.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

 

Lou, Y., Abrami, P.C. and d’Apollonia, S. (2001) Small group and individual learning with technology: a meta-analysis, Review of Educational Research, 71(3): 449–521.

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.

 

Nettleck, D. (2005). Computers , thinking and learning: inspiring students with technology . Camberwell : ACER Press. Portland : International Specialized Book Services.

 

NSW Board of Studies, 1998, English K-6 Syllabus, Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and its Environment K-6 syllabus. Sydney, Australia; Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia; Board of Studies NSW.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training and NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Inc. (2004). The Report of the Review of Aboriginal Education. Retrieved on 16th April 2013 from

https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/media/downloads/reviews/aboriginaledu/report/aer2003_04.pdf

 

Petty, G. (2009). Evidence based teaching: A practical approach. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes

 

Roberts, J. (2004). Engaging student in active learning: Case studies in geography, environment and related disciplines. Cheltenham, UK : Geography Discipline Network. University of Gloucestershire.

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Interactive Flash Game: Clean Up The River

Interactive Flash Game: Clean Up The River | EDUP3002 Care of Resources | Scoop.it
Gloria Chan's insight:

The interactive flash game by Clean up Australia provide student effective resource with visual and audio cues to enhance student learning on waste disposal and management. It provides enjoyment in learning to process information easier through multiple means of representation (CAST, 2012). Using interactive flash game   delivers an effect size of 0.52 (Petty, 2009). As a results, shows how productive in using resources like interactive flash games as cue to deliver effective teaching in education.

 

A teaching idea:

 

Book a computer lab session for the class and arrange students to work into pairs. The use of the interactive flash game allow students to consolidate their understanding of the importance of waste disposal and its effects as well as to see how much waste is inappropriately deposited into our environment (ie: waterways of Murray River). Explain to the class that the first section gives students a special task to help clean the river by collecting waste they see which does not belong in the water. The second task engages students to identify and sort waste into the appropriate bin for recycling or disposal for better waste management and disposal in the environment (ie: organise, plastic bags, plastic, aluminium, paper, glass). The interactive and curriculum based learning resource provides students with fundamental skills to facilitate their application in everyday situations even beyond school to create a better environment.

 

Extension Activity:

 

Students return back to their classroom and present three disposal bins labelled and colour coded as follows:

Red: General WasteBlue: Paper recyclingYellow:  Plastic and Aluminium containers

The colour of the bins provide a fun way for students to identify and learn to adopt to appropriate waste disposal behaviours at school and carry on this understanding in their home and public places and additionally achieves the outcome of RS1.7 (NSW BOS, 1996, p. 32) from the information gathered.

 

Roberts (2004) highlights how active learning and participation such as students creating their own signs and placed around the school will promote and offer positive reinforcements of good waste disposal behaviours and actions. The idea of posters and signs will increase student interest and to help develop a school-wide approach to educate the school community of what items should go into which bins to create a better school environment. As a result it actively involves students, the school would be able to reduce the amount of rubbish in the school grounds, reduce the amount of waste going to landfill, increase the levels of recycling materials and save the school money on waste management fees.

 

Teachers note: This can used cross curriculum ES-S3 and modified accordingly to suit HSIE Outcome and Subject Matter.

 

References:

 

CAST. 2012. National Center On Universal Design for Learning. At CAST. Retrieved on 10th April 2013 from http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/whatisudl

 

NSW Board of Studies, 1998, English K-6 Syllabus, Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Petty, G. (2009). Evidence based teaching: A practical approach. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes

 

Roberts, J. (2004). Engaging student in active learning: Case studies in geography, environment and related disciplines. Cheltenham, UK : Geography Discipline Network. University of Gloucestershire.

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Aboriginal Perspective Youtube Video: Yanyuwa : Gulf of Carpentaria. NT.

Yanyuwa Indigenous people from Gulf of Carpentaria, Northern Territory are working together at the forefront of protecting and managing Australia's unique, n...
Gloria Chan's insight:

The Youtube video of Yanyuwa Indigenous people from Gulf of Carpentaria, Northern Territory has been endorsed / uploaded by the Australian Government from the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. According to the selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander studies the Youtube video shows authenticity of the resource. As it provides explicit interviews and information about the “Caring for Country” program and references to how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people together shares their knowledge and responsibilities in helping to care for the Australian land and resources.

 

A teaching idea:

 

Emphasize the importance of understanding Aboriginal perspectives and knowledge in caring of resources and how Aboriginal people have positive interacted with the environment for a long time (NSW HSIE BOS, 2006). Students will be separated into groups of 4. Each group would be given an Aboriginal perspective (w/ permission from the Local Aboriginal Community) to show how Aboriginal people protect and care for the Australian environment. The groups create a still image of their assigned perspective to demonstrate to the class. The teacher can tap into the students to express their ideas of their image. The still image engage student to extend their imagination and language of descriptions influencing student to demonstrate quality writing in student reflection and understanding. The class will reflect on each group’s image and discuss the importance of how working and understanding with Aboriginal Community are essential to effectively care for resources and the environment in Australia.

 

Extension Activity:

 

Take students onto an excursion to the Blue Mountains Botanic Gardens Mount Tomah where students can physically be involved and acknowledge the land preserved by Aboriginal people passed down heritage and responsibilities. Students are able to deeply understand the importance of working together to take care of the environment we live in.

 

More information for excursion ideas:  http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/welcome/quick_links/aboriginal_heritage#peo

 

NSW Department of Education and Training and the Aboriginal Education Consultative Group (AECG) (2004) highlight the Aboriginal community at school to emphasize the importance to promote positive relationships to stimulate effective learning. Therefore through engaging in co-operative learning, students learn to give and receive help, listen to other children’s perspectives and resolve problems democratically (Gillies, 2007, p.50). Involving group work activities, students are engaged in generating a variety of ideas, student share different perspective on the task results to a better understanding of their ideas and conflict leads to critical thinking (Mclnerney & Mclnerney, 2010, p.271).

 

References:

 

Gillies, R. M. (2007). Cooperative Learning: Integrating theory and practices. Los Angeles, Calif. SAGE Publications.

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and its Environment K-6 syllabus. Sydney, Australia; Board of Studies NSW.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training and NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Inc. (2004). The Report of the Review of Aboriginal Education. Retrieved on 16th April 2013 from

https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/media/downloads/reviews/aboriginaledu/report/aer2003_04.pdf

 

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Youtube Video: A Story of Trash

http://www.youtube.com/user/StPetersburgCollege Away: A Story of Trash Students partner with WEDU to educate viewers about where their trash goes when they t...
Gloria Chan's insight:

The involvement of incorporating technology into education has been increasing rapidly and therefore has transformed the way education is conducted in classrooms (Lou et al. 2001). For example using this Youtube video resource helps students learn more and facilitate about the environment and develop ideas of caring of resources. Mclnerney & Mclnerney (2010) emphasize using technology allow students to gain deeper understanding, knowledge and skills to meet the challenging demands involved in the continuous development of technology and information which HSIE can deliver.

 

A teaching idea:


View Youtube video as a class on the IWB. Encourage students to focus on the problems they see in the Youtube video. Engage students in a classroom discussion and create a class mindmap on the whiteboard to display student ideas. Marsh (2010) identifies how classroom discussion provides students the opportunity to communicate effectively and enhance their skills to critically think and pose questions such as the effects it could have towards the environment. Additionally, it assists students to construct strategies, solutions and actions to reduce the amount of waste that occurs and identify how to manage waste appropriately.

Assessment Task


Building on student’s understanding from the video, instruct the students to imagine they are now in the year 2030 and waste management has not been solved. Ask students to imagine what would their local environment be like if their local area ran out of room for their rubbish. This assess student understanding of the interactions with the environment that can affect their life.

Students creatively create an artwork (ie: draw, paint, collage) to illustrate the issues that might occur when there are no room to put rubbish. Discuss with the class the issues that could occur to provide students with ideas such as:
• What effects would happen to the environment and the people?
• How come there are no room for rubbish?
• How can rubbish impact on our health?

Student’s artworks are posted in the classroom wall and reflect on the issues on how the environment and people interact and ways to care for the environment. Gibson & Ewing (2011) outlines how positive learning experiences encourage students to effectively gain greater understanding of the topic in depth. Through the use of artworks it provides creativity and meaningful learning on how to effectively manage a sustainable environment to minimise the issue to occur in 2030 if we do not manage our waste appropriately.

References:
Gibson, R. & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillian

Lou, Y., Abrami, P.C. and d’Apollonia, S. (2001) Small group and individual learning with technology: a meta-analysis, Review of Educational Research, 71(3):
449–521.

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.

 

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Clean Up Australia 2012 Rubbish Report

2012 Clean Up Australia rubbish report
Gloria Chan's insight:

The 2012 Rubbish Report are results of rubbish that were removed from numerous locations such as parks, schools, bushlands, beaches and roads in 2012. Focus on page 4 of the report for stage 1 students, the explicit graphic illustration of the top ten rubbish found within the Australian environment can provide an introduction for students to identify common waste incorrectly disposed.

 

A teaching idea:

 

As a teacher, I would register my class to participate in the Clean Up Australia’s School Clean up day program for students. It is a day where my students can learn about their environment and contribute to their local community as well achieve the HSIE syllabus outcome.

 

Simultaneously, I would use this opportunity for students work in groups of 4-5 students and go around collecting rubbish from different areas in the school community. The groups will present to the class the items they have found around the school, which have been disposed incorrectly (ie: not placed in waste disposal bins and left lying around the school area). Additionally, the students successfully meet the Stage 1 Mathematics outcome of DS1.1 (NSW BOS, 2002, p. 86).  As the class will identify and tally the results and will either construct a column or picture graph on the interactive smart boards.

 

Bobis et al. (2009) identified the importance to challenge students to think mathematically and critically as the class interpret the graph and discuss the results. Giving students a range of learning experiences to understand their school community of the most rubbish found and using statistic data to devise plans and strategies to reduce issue at school

 

The experimental learning involves students to be motivated to participate and be involved in the community such as with the Clean up Australia program. Activities such as cleaning the school community and conducting own investigations helps to broaden understanding about caring for resources. The active learning methods engage students to “develop their skills and understanding of an environment” (Gilbert, 2007, p.152). Additionally, students are able to take this new understanding and contribute positively to the wider world community.

 

References:

 

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J. & Lowrie, T. (2009).  Mathematics for children: Challenging children to think mathematically (3rd edition). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Education Australia.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia; Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and its Environment K-6 syllabus. Sydney, Australia; Board of Studies NSW.

 

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Global Perspective: London recycling collection services and management

Global Perspective: London recycling collection services and management | EDUP3002 Care of Resources | Scoop.it

Disposal choices for commercial\business & industrial refuse.. Our recycling and residual waste collection vehicles come to theCity of London Monday – Friday every week so we can tailor a removal diary to suit your needs. Grundon are committed to more cost effective and environmentally acceptable waste removal and disposal methods. Our leading edge MRF (Materials Recovery Facilities have earned us the custom of high profile customers who feel similarly about care for the environment.


Via david ouell
Gloria Chan's insight:

Inspiring students to use the Internet to search for information provides a great education resource to engage and enhance their learning at school. Nettlbeck (2005) explains how learning with technology improves student’s communication and relationships that students can apply in the real world context.

 

A teaching idea:

 

Together as a class, the teacher will model and observe The City of London & Greater London waste collection and recycling services website on an IWB. The class will browse through the website and identify all the services The City of London waste collection offers to the London community and write down ideas into a table or other graphic organiser suitable to student needs. A global perspective website such as London’s waste management service provides an effective teaching resource to incorporate into student learning. It engage students to analyse a website from a London perspective.

 

Ask the class if they know what is their local waste management disposal service. Describe what they see their local waste service do for them.  Instruct the students to individually search for their local waste management service and report back to the class. Students will share what they have found and are to highlight the services they offer to the local community to the class.

 

For example: JJ Richards (http://www.jjrichards.com.au).

 

As students have found out their local waste service students will name and identify its local waste management service and write down ideas onto a table.

 

Assessment task

 

Show the students the two tables of the two waste management services from the two different countries. Through student understanding of the HSIE topic, discuss with the class about the similarities and differences between the London waste service and the local waste service. This subsequently achieves the outcome of WS1.9 (NSW BOS, 1996, p.36) as students use the language of comparison to write 2-3 sentences reflecting on the differences of services. Additionally, students can draw the services the waste management offer to assist their writing.

 

Engage students in a class discussion to reinforce on why they think different waste management offer different service to their own community.

 

Extension Activity:

Students will write a diary entry as they run for the local waste service and describe their day at work.

 

The exploration of two waste management service websites engages students to find and locate important information and illustrate a descriptive understanding of what students read. Followed by students communicating to the class of the similarities and differences through the language of comparison. Additionally, students are able to develop critical thinking and reasoning from the information gathered (Gilbert, 2007).

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

 

Nettleck, D. (2005). Computers, Thinking and Learning: Inspiring Students with Technology. Camberwell : ACER Press. Portland : International Specialized Book Services.

 

NSW Board of Studies, 1998, English K-6 Syllabus, Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

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