Educators as curators
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Educators as curators
Exploring the educator's role in the 21st century
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Content Curation Tools: 21 Criteria To Select And Evaluate Your Ideal One

Content Curation Tools: 21 Criteria To Select And Evaluate Your Ideal One | Educators as curators | Scoop.it
Nonetheless we are just at the beginning of a new era, in which content curation will be as important as search, there is already an apparent abundance of content curation tools of all kinds. To the superficial eye, many such
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Sources and Tags: Dennis O'Connor's Curating Secrets

Sources and Tags: Dennis O'Connor's Curating Secrets | Educators as curators | Scoop.it

There's no question that Dennis O'Connor has found much success on Scoop.it. It wasn't all coincidental, though. Dennis shared with us two of his best curation secrets and tricks:

 

1. Develop multiple sources for your topics
It's important to carefully think through the keywords that you set for your topic so that Scoop.it can crawl the web and provide you with interesting and relevant content and inspiration. In addition to taking full advantage of this, Dennis also uses other tools like Twitter, StumbleUpon, and Prismatic to find content to share on Scoop.it. Once he finds the content he wants to share with his audience, he uses Scoop.it as his social media hub to add value to that content and share it everywhere.

 

2. Tag your posts
Dennis takes a lot of time to tag each of his posts. This allows him, he explained, to assemble publications based upon his tagged topics. When he's using his information on Scoop.it for his E-learning classes, it's easy for him to filter his Scoop.it pages based upon different subjects and easily compile a list of posts and articles on appropriate topics to provide to his students. Something interesting that Dennis does with his tagged articles is to pull them by subject and create "special editions" of his topics on his blog for special classes and events that he is teaching.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Rhys Williams's curator insight, March 9, 2015 12:05 PM

This picture here gave me some insight onto what was going on within the article.

Brad Upton's curator insight, March 9, 2015 12:10 PM

I liked this article because it deals digital information fluency.

Marianne Hart's curator insight, April 12, 2015 9:00 PM

Good graphic for Ss research too!

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Currating games....

Have a look at this video. An experienced MOORPG player suggests "what to play" using a very creative approach. The video is indeed interesting from a currator's point of view on how it introduces the problem and how it offers an own curration for solving it...

One could get inspired by such a presentation to elaborate a similar presentation approach on the limits of current practices on a topic and what examples of overcoming them are avalailable. Scooping is fine tool to manage your currations. However, presenting them can be done very creatively exploiting other media types as well!

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Educators as Curators: 8 Steps to Bringing Your Students the Best of the Web | edcetera - Rafter Blog

Educators as Curators: 8 Steps to Bringing Your Students the Best of the Web | edcetera - Rafter Blog | Educators as curators | Scoop.it

Educators have been curators for hundreds of years before modern technological advances...

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"Curation, Creation, Collaboration: The Trajectory of Digital Books"

Keynote presentation by William Rankin, Director of Educational Innovation at Abilene Christian University, during the ACU Connected Open House, April 4 and ...
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The idea of curation is used to brand social learning

I like this site because it use the idea of curation to develop its own identity, its very name!

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Networks, Ecologies, and Curatorial Teaching « Connectivism

Networks, Ecologies, and Curatorial Teaching « Connectivism | Educators as curators | Scoop.it

Siemens argues that educators play the dual role of network administrators and curators when they create, organize and manage meaningful learning spaces. How could technology further facilitate this?

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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Educators as curators | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, LaiaJoana, Rui Guimarães Lima, Ramon Aragon, Paulo Simões, Dennis T OConnor
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

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Reciprocity: Understanding online social relations | First Monday | E. Pelaprat & B. Brown

Reciprocity: Understanding online social relations | First Monday | E. Pelaprat & B. Brown | Educators as curators | Scoop.it

"Reciprocity is a key concept for understanding social behaviour. It involves complex interactions of giving and returning. This paper examines the concept of reciprocity to think about, and design for, online social interactions. We argue that reciprocal exchange is symbolic insofar as it produces and enacts many forms of social life by drawing individuals into a relation of recognition."

 

Comment: full paper, so you need some time to read it all through, but it is well  worth the effort. If you are in a hurry, skip the middle part in which the authors attack Peter Pirolli and Peter Kollock for providing useful, but incomplete accounts of online social behaviour (of which networked learning is of course an example). They also attack Rational Choice Theory, which assumes that people 'are in it' for a profit. They have an alternative approach, based in mutual recognition through symbolic gifts, which makes much sense, even though I fail to see how it necssarily invalidates RCT or game theory. In my view, theirs is just another level descriptive apparatus that with some effort may be brought in line with, say, game theory. A symbolic gift has symbolic value (that is, value that is imparted on it by the receiver and sender). This value could be the start of the utility computations that game theory typically works with. However, this does not detract from the value of their descriptive apparatus for _designing_ social online environments, such as learning networks. Such a design allows for encounters, which afford symbolic exchange and, as a consequence thereof, mutual recognition of participants.

For example and if I interprete them correctly, Scoop.it could be improved if a more direct interaction between posters and readers were possible (encounter). My gift is symbolic, this scoop, but what I get in return cannot be attributed to particular people (my score is an aggregated measure of the behaviour of my readers, rendered through an opaque algorythm). So there's no real encounter. To remedy this situation, I tweet about all my scoops and the recognition then is afforded by Twitter, outside of Scoop.it. Actually, since Scoop.it stimulates me to use other social media for this, their choice of not affording direct encounter may not be such a bad one. 

(peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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Content Curation Primer

Content Curation Primer | Educators as curators | Scoop.it

Content curation is the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.

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What do Curators, e-Educators and Constructivists all have in common?

What do Curators, e-Educators and Constructivists all have in common? | Educators as curators | Scoop.it

Debbie Morison is finding useful analogies that link curration, eLearning and Constructivism.

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7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction: Are You Content Fried!

7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction:  Are You Content Fried! | Educators as curators | Scoop.it
This morning I learned a new word for information overload - "content fried" from a colleague at the Packard Foundation.    It resonated.    We have so much content in our professional lives.
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