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How America lost the Middle East

How America lost the Middle East | educationland | Scoop.it
The US can't solve the region's problems — and it should stop trying.

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Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 8:28 PM

the article shows how even though the US tries to establish a presence in places and help the country, we only hurt it and lower Americas reputation.

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Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine

Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine | educationland | Scoop.it
World War II-era maps conjure a period in history when titanic forces were on the move, or were stuck in brutal stalemate, all over the globe.

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Lee Hall's curator insight, May 30, 2014 9:42 AM

You can also find film footage of Capa's picture of the man in the surf of Normandy that was later published in Life magazine.

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Cold War Bomb Shelter

Cold War Bomb Shelter | educationland | Scoop.it

Hal Hayes' Cold War bomb shelter,1953. Using the pool as a decontamination space! California architecture http://pic.twitter.com/4gLw17tC17 ;


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2014 12:02 PM

This picture has some cool vintage artwork to demonstrate innovative technology that was being use to create as a secret lair that when I was a boy would've been the envy of the neighborhood.  Yet, underneath this campy image is a profoundly tense geopolitical situation that was driving such schemes.  The image is both playful and ominous. 

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10 American Facts You Can Use To Ruin Any July 4 Party

10 American Facts You Can Use To Ruin Any July 4 Party | educationland | Scoop.it
Just in case you want to be *that* person....

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A Post–World War I “Hunger Map of Europe,” Aimed at the Hearts of American Kids 

A Post–World War I “Hunger Map of Europe,” Aimed at the Hearts of American Kids  | educationland | Scoop.it

This map prefaced a 1919 book by the United States Food Administration, titled Food Saving and Sharing: Telling How the Older Children of America May Help Save From Famine Their Comrades In Allied Lands Across the Sea. “Remember,” the text asked its readers, “that every little country on the [map] is not merely an outline, but represents millions of people who are suffering from hunger."


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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 6, 2014 3:02 PM

An  interesting story about the Germans:n France “the Germans set to work deliberately to do as much harm as possible,” destroying fruit trees and vineyards; they poisoned wells and burned houses.

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A global guide to the first world war - interactive documentary

A global guide to the first world war - interactive documentary | educationland | Scoop.it
Ten historians from 10 countries give a brief history of the first world war through a global lens. Using original news reports, interactive maps and rarely seen footage, including extraordinary shots of troops crossing Mesopotamia on camels and Italians fighting high up in the Alps, the half hour film explores the war and its effect from many different perspectives. Watch the documentary in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Arabic or Hindi.

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Andrea Taylor's curator insight, August 8, 2014 9:54 AM

world war I interactive!!!!  Looks coolio!

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What is a part of the United States?


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | educationland | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:51 PM

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:34 PM

i dont understand how a country like india that is mostly modern and on the world scale can still have such an ancient system of labeling people be such a prominent practice in their society, i hope modi gets elected so he can start to eliminate this

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Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes

Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes | educationland | Scoop.it

"For 75 years, Finland's expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It's like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 30, 2014 3:58 PM

This is a fascinating article that can be a great case study to share with students to allow them to analyze the factors that can improve infant mortality rates.  In Finland the government provided oversight to improve infant mortality rates, pre-natal care and promote good parenting in a way that has had tangible results.  


Tags: Finland, medical, population,demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Gillian Campbell's curator insight, July 31, 2014 6:04 AM

It's certainly an interesting one.....

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | educationland | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:43 PM

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, September 5, 5:02 PM
Over the years the United States has shown a number of leading employer industries. In the 1990"s the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most United States, followed by Retail Trade industries. In 2003, Retail Trade was the leading employer, but by 2013 health Care and Social Assistance was dominant industries in 34 States. From the 1990"s to 2013 employment has been on a steady decline while Health Care and Social Assistance became largest industries in New York (1992) and North Dakota (1995).
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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:27 AM

CULTURAL UNIT

This amazing youtube video is something we watched in class, and is such a great animation. This video charts hundreds of years of cultural diffusion in a mere five minutes. You can see empires rise and crumple, people die and become born, as well as many other significant dates. This applies to the diffusion patterns of culture, because we can see where people and cultures are going throughout the centuries. 

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Do Teachers Need iPad Training? - Edudemic

Do Teachers Need iPad Training? - Edudemic | educationland | Scoop.it

"We have come to a point in the education technology journey where it seems rather dull to still be asking if the iPad is the right device for the classroom. The answer, in case you’ve missed the last few years of debate is that it is a great option, but this is not universally accepted and never will be. Nonetheless, one of the attributes you’ll hear put forward is that it is easy to use because of the intuitive nature of iOS. This is absolutely true; you can put the iPad into the hands of almost any child and within a short period of time they will have mastered it.

 

So does it then follow that you can out the iPad into the hands of teachers and expect the same results?

 

No."


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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, August 10, 2014 7:16 PM
The emphasis on iPads is a bit of a distraction here - the issue is related more to the ability of teachers to create engaging learnng opportunities where technology use extends and enhances the students' capacity for self-direction, information literacy, collaboration. culural awareness, etc... be it with an iPad or other ICT, the point is that too many teachers still rely on delivery and control, rather than authentic opportunities for learning.
Gary Harwell's curator insight, August 18, 2014 3:38 PM

The answer if YES!

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 15, 2015 7:14 PM

I completely agree. Time needs to be given to training teachers!!

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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | educationland | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2014 11:01 AM

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  This article from the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering which is undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless.     


Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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The Reality of English's Role in India

The Reality of English's Role in India | educationland | Scoop.it
Protests over the use of English in a civil-service exam highlight the complex role the language plays in the country's social makeup.
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GIS in the History Classroom

GIS in the History Classroom | educationland | Scoop.it

"I have had a number of requests for copies of GIS in the History Classroom in a format other than iBooks. I have just completed an internet version of the book that works on Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 30, 2014 8:27 PM

GIS is not just for geography classes; spatial thinking and spatial data management can help students learn a variety of subjects including history.  This free ebook will help history teachers to see how to unlock the power of Geographic Information Systems. 


Tagsmappinghistorical, GIS, geospatial, edtech.

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The Geography of D-Day

"Holy historic spaces! Has it really been 70 years? Indeed! on June 6th 2014, we commemorate the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy, France….a major turning point in World War 2, and even in world history, the repercussions of which we can still see today. This place, on this date, is when "Team West" was born, creating an entity that defines the modern world like no other, and has hugely shaped the path of the planet for 7 decades. This podcasts deals with just a few aspects of the geography of this particular military maneuver and its global repercussions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 24, 2014 2:15 PM

If you haven't yet discovered John Boyer, a.k.a. the Plaid Avenger,  I recommend exploring his site.  He has numerous resources for world regional geography and current global affairs with great historical context. 

Anne-Maree Johnson's curator insight, June 24, 2014 7:33 PM

 detailed podcast outlining the impacts of geopgraphy on the D-Day landings. Initially it seems as though the content is only relevant to Americans as the presenter discusses various Memorial days in the U.S., but the content broadens in scope a couple of minutes into the podcast.

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The British View the War of 1812 Quite Differently Than Americans Do

The British View the War of 1812 Quite Differently Than Americans Do | educationland | Scoop.it
The star-spangled war confirmed independence for the United States. But for Great Britain, it was a betrayal

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9 Things You May Not Know About the Declaration of Independence

9 Things You May Not Know About the Declaration of Independence | educationland | Scoop.it
As people across the United States celebrate the nation’s birthday, explore nine surprising facts about the founding document adopted on July 4, 1776.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 6, 2014 2:50 PM

another interesting read by Seth

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The French and British Redrew the Middle East After World War I

The French and British Redrew the Middle East After World War I | educationland | Scoop.it
Now that map is crumbling.

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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | educationland | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | educationland | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


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HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 2014 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:45 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 

 

Tags: food production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | educationland | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | educationland | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America. 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 24, 5:31 PM
This interactive map quizzes you on the location of the states of Africa and it shows the percentage of how many people found certain countries. South Africa, Madagascar and other more recognizable countries had higher percentages, but it is still a difficult quiz as many people do not know the geography of Africa. 
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How Technology Is Being Used In Music Classrooms - Edudemic

How Technology Is Being Used In Music Classrooms - Edudemic | educationland | Scoop.it
Even though I’m not a music teacher (nor have I ever been, or will I be), I tend to find technology in music classrooms to be some of the most exciting ways that technology is being put to use in classrooms overall. While there’s lots of time-saving-efficient-cool-useful stuff happening in all types of classrooms, there’s …

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22 Apps To Make Videos In The Classroom

22 Apps To Make Videos In The Classroom | educationland | Scoop.it
22 Of The Newest--And Best--Apps To Make Videos In The Classroom (22 Of The Best Apps To Make Videos In The Classroom http://t.co/6jdjSdv6Wz #edtech #21stedchat http://t.co/eLtMjcU3UC)...

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Susan Berkowitz's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:44 PM

I work with many special needs students who love to take pictures and make videos. Give them the supports they need to add captions, narration, text and you've got a great way for them to demonstrate learning.