Educational Technology: Policy & Government
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Educational Technology: Policy & Government
The intersection of society, technology, policy, and government.
Curated by Gordon Shupe
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From Good Intentions to Real Outcomes - Connected Learning Alliance

From Good Intentions to Real Outcomes - Connected Learning Alliance | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
The growth of online communication, media, and gaming is driving dramatic changes in how we learn. Responding to these shifts, new forms of technology-enhanced learning and instruction, such as personalized learning, open online courses, educational games and apps, and tools for learning analytics, are garnering significant public attention and private investment. These technologies hold tremendous promise …
Gordon Shupe's insight:
What I am reading and experiencing: "Once technological and economic barriers are removed, broader social and cultural forces determine outcomes."
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Apple's Move to Kill Cookies Brings Plea From Six Major Trade Associations

Apple's Move to Kill Cookies Brings Plea From Six Major Trade Associations | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
In short, cookies will operate on users' Safari browsers as they always have, but with one significant caveat: Apple will purge all their data after 24 hours. Previously, marketers and ad-tech companies could access cookies' data for 30 days.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Some interesting ideas here for digital literacy and awareness.

I found this little factoid surprising for mobile browsers: "Safari's share of the U.S. mobile browser market is 52%, followed by Google's Chrome at 39%, according to the latest data from StatCounter."
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Australia is now King Idiot of the internet | ZDNet

Australia is now King Idiot of the internet | ZDNet | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
A middle-power nation thinking it can tell US-based multinationals which parts of mathematics they can and cannot use -- we deserve to be sent to time out.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
This title is not going to make my Aussie friends happy, but I think the primary message is one most Technology Savvy folks will agree with... encryption serves a purpose that government shouldn't have unfettered access to break.
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Subscription Based Pricing is not the Answer

Subscription Based Pricing is not the Answer | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
The real push towards subscription based apps started in June 2016 when
Apple announced that subscription pricing was available for regular apps.
I'm noticing more and more indie developers considering the move, and some
have already made the jump to this new pricing model.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
As an individual, I avoid subscriptions. But for underfunded schools or non-profits, subscription based apps are especially difficult. Our funding is very limited, and we often have to continue using old versions of software because we have to devote $$$ to other needs year by year. And when you are dependent on donations, governmental budget changes or a shifting tax base - there is no guarantee you will have sufficient money to 're–up'.
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Copyright a Little Fuzzy?

Copyright a Little Fuzzy? | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators. Site contains a Software Reviews Database, articles from Technology & Learning Magazine, articles from Educators in Educators' eZine, Event and Contest listings, Reader suggested Web sites, and weekly news updates on education technology leaders." />
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Infographic makes a complex subject easier to understand.
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Thomas Jefferson Debunked One of History’s Most Offensive Scientific Theories

Thomas Jefferson Debunked One of History’s Most Offensive Scientific Theories | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
In late 1785, Jefferson dined with Buffon in the count’s summer mansion outside Paris. Jefferson found that Buffon was “absolutely unacquainted” with the American moose and thought it was simply a miscategorized reindeer. Jefferson told the count “that the rein deer could walk under the belly of our moose.” Jefferson noted that Buffon had “entirely scouted the idea.” Finally, though, Buffon relented and hinted that if Jefferson could present him with the antlers of a giant moose, he would pull back—either by omission or by an admission of error, it isn’t clear from the historical record which—his theory of degeneracy in the next volume of Histoire Naturelle.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
How many times have men (who call themselves 'scientists') proclaim bias as a factual truth? 

Fascinating story of a great great great great uncle of mine: Thomas Jefferson.
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How coding could be the next Spanish class in Florida high schools - Orlando Business Journal

​Florida high school students could soon ditch foreign language classes in favor of computer coding.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
If you are interested in more information about the coding/programming course role in High School Graduation requirements (as of 2015) check out http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/01/18/29/11829.pdf
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Ed-Tech and the Commercialization of School

Ed-Tech and the Commercialization of School | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
We can’t talk about corporate interests and ed-tech without talking about testing. We can’t talk about corporate interests and ed-tech without talking about politics and policies. Why do we test? Why do we measure? Why has this become big business? Why has this become the cornerstone of education policy?
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Today was the first day back from summer vacation for teachers in my school district. It was a familiar routine: breakfast, welcome back, introduction of new staff and acknowledgement of  those who were working over the summer. A mixer, a reminder of why we are teachers and then a review of last year's student standardized test scores. Analysis of gains based on different tests some years apart. Illogical use of statistics, questionable assessment procedures, extreme stress, and a lack of confidence in the value of high stakes testing results.
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Soft Rigor - a friendly way to learn more | thoughts | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast

Soft Rigor - a friendly way to learn more | thoughts | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
Reflections of an educational technology specialist on pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, culture, and technology integration.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Are you still hearing talk of increasing the 'Rigor' of your curriculum? Maybe there is a better approach…
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Hey Siri! At Apple WWDC 2016, Tim Cook needs to make big data, AI pivot | ZDNet

Hey Siri! At Apple WWDC 2016, Tim Cook needs to make big data, AI pivot | ZDNet | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
Apple has boxed itself into a big data and artificial intelligence corner and fallen behind the likes of Amazon and Google. It's time for a new pact between Apple and its customers to make an AI comeback.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Hmmmm, a good discussion…
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A Periodic Table of Visualization Methods

Gordon Shupe's insight:
Design wise, it is not as clean as I would like, but it is very thought provoking regarding the many ways to leverage the visual.
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Why Teachers, Parents, and Society at Large Have Destroyed Kids’ Love of Learning

Why Teachers, Parents, and Society at Large Have Destroyed Kids’ Love of Learning | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
The pressure to achieve academically is a crime against learning.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Sometimes learning may take perseverance, persistent "work" – BUT most of the time learning should be fun!
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Finding the "Perfect" Test?

Finding the "Perfect" Test? | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
"All of us — at the local, state, and federal level, the Education Department included — have to take responsibility for the climate that exists," he said. ”There is no question that the contentious
Gordon Shupe's insight:

A must read for educators, parents, policy makers, and citizens in general. There is no question- the biggest beneficiary of our testing climate are the publishing companies.

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'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia

'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
The Google, Apple and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks who worry the race for human attention has created a world of perpetual distraction that could ultimately end in disaster
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Wholistic Technology Literacy Imperative: We need to be aware of how we are being manipulated and mindful of what choices we are making and how we are connecting.
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How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life

How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
The unique 21st-century misery of the online shaming victim.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
This would be a good article for teaching Digital Citizenship!
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The Hourly Wage Required To Afford A Two-Bedroom Rental In Each State

The Hourly Wage Required To Afford A Two-Bedroom Rental In Each State | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
It's not a pretty picture.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Why is this an Educational Technology: Policy & Government topic you ask? Because this article is bringing up the minimum wage question again... This time the argument implied is that everyone is entitled to a minimum wage that will allow them to afford a two bedroom rental in their state. (Or that housing costs should drop to match the minimum wage.)

I think that once again, we are asking the wrong question when we ask: "What should minimum wage be?"

Maybe the questions should be: 
> Are there entry level jobs that help employers and employees mature into productive adults with living-wage work positions?
> Are there entry level jobs that help develop and demonstrate a work ethic, minimum literacy, self-discipline, and low level skills as a path to a position that requires less supervision, less basic training, and is built on experience and more advanced skill sets?
> Should those that tend to say "I am going to do the minimum I need to do to get by," be able to be hang-out at an entry level job and not grow and mature into really productive, independent, financially secure citizens?

I think that employers are offering an "opportunity" to employees to prove their worth to the mission of their business. Employers need to have entry level positions to determine whether the employee will be responsible, productive, and contribute positively to the culture and profitability of their workplace. Then once they can advance them, increase their wages incrementally, and provide them with an incentive to stay. Or with the experience and work profile they have earned, they can go on to another employer and enter at a higher level wages established for person with a proven track record.

Now on to Education
Entitlements and social programs unintentionally often have a negative effect on educational institutions... particularly in the area of motivation to learn.
• public education is compulsory, instead of being considered a privilege (the result is students view school as 'a prison' that they are required to attend). 
• Parents reinforce this by saying you have to go to school, not you have an opportunity to go learn.
• Parents also tend to think of public school as their free babysitting service, and abdicate their parental responsibilities as their student's primary educator.
• The capstone problem is that some students already look at minimum wages, it seems like a lot of money (and don't have a realistic view of the expenses of being an independent adult). Just as the businesses are asking for higher-skilled employees for more technical (technology-based) jobs, we are suggesting that entry-level, unskilled positions wages should be sufficient to live off of. I have had students drop out of school because they could earn a reasonably high wage, and then become trapped at that intellectual/skill level.
• We already elevate (the few) entertainers and athletes to outrageous salaries and opulent, hedonistic lifestyles... undercutting the motivation for education. Educators already have issues establishing a need for students to persevere, and go deeper intellectually. "I am gong to be a famous rapper." or "I am the next LeBron James." Nothing wrong with dreaming big, but have a backup plan, kids!

If we raise the minimum wage to the levels needed for a two bedroom rental, employers will have to be more selective, offer less hours and move towards more automation (kiosks, robotic replacements), and the typical 'starter jobs' will become harder to find. Either the costs of products and services will go up, or small business will have a harder time of making it because raising the minimum wage will inadvertently have a trickle-up effect on management wages.
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Macs are a third as expensive to own as Windows PCs, IBM's IT guy says

Macs are a third as expensive to own as Windows PCs, IBM's IT guy says | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
Only 5% of IBM's Mac employees needed help-desk support, versus 40% of PC users.

At that time, some 30,000 IBM employees were using Macs. Today 90,000 of them are, he said. And IBM ultimately plans to distribute 150,000 to 200,000 Macs to workers, meaning about half of IBM's approximately 370,000 employees will have Macs.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Maybe MIS Departments and School Boards will pay attention to this. It would be great to see educators get their Mac's back!
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Worsening teacher shortage puts more underprepared teachers in classrooms, report says

Worsening teacher shortage puts more underprepared teachers in classrooms, report says | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
A non-profit journalism website reporting on key education issues in California and beyond.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
I am not sure people realize how complicated the education problem is. Secretary DeVos doesn't, but neither do the majority of Americans. It begs the question: "Why is there a teacher shortage?"
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 11, 7:40 PM
This is complicated by part-time contracts at the beginning of careers that force young teachers to reconsider teaching. As well, teachers at the end of their careers may be opting for part-time contracts that segue into retirement. The current thinking about teacher education is flawed.
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A Great Science Teacher Quit Because US Schools Are Broken

A Great Science Teacher Quit Because US Schools Are Broken | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
Why do some of the best science teachers quit teaching?
Gordon Shupe's insight:
This article was a disappointment because it didn't really go into as much detail about why "US Schools Are Broken". I think many of my teaching friends could cover a lot more reasons.
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The troublesome shortage of instructional designers (essay)

The troublesome shortage of instructional designers (essay) | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
Institutions should consider building programs that help mold the instructional designers of tomorrow, teaching students how to thoughtfully merge user experience with pedagogical styles, technology and data.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Since this is what I do, it is really hard to step back and be objective about this. Many K12 School Systems don't even understand the importance or need for people to do this type of work.
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Process Change: How to Do School Differently -- THE Journal

Process Change: How to Do School Differently -- THE Journal | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
November said he believes the reason technology so far has failed to move the needle on a system-wide scale in education is that most K-12 leaders haven't changed their processes to take full advantage of technology's power. He points to research from Harvard Business School Professor Shoshana Zuboff and others who have noted that process change is "absolutely essential" for technology to improve quality in any organization.

"Technology without process change is just a $1,000 pencil," he said.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
So true, there is a lack of vision: legislative understanding of the learning process, policies built by corporate greed.
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What Now? Intentionally Designing Life at College and Beyond (EdSurge News)

What Now? Intentionally Designing Life at College and Beyond (EdSurge News) | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
Come their junior and senior years, college students inevitably are faced with the wickedly tough question, “What am I going to do with my life?” Teaching at Stanford, I can see the angst that I once felt in these students’ faces, hear it in their voices and read it in their body language. Even t
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Designing your student experience.
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A master teacher went to court to challenge her low evaluation. What her win means for her profession.

A master teacher went to court to challenge her low evaluation. What her win means for her profession. | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
How it could affect other teachers.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Please, please read this and share this. 
I think this is a very powerful account of reversing the tide on the abuse of statistics, learning environment, and professional educators. The madness has got to stop!
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9 Elephants in the (Class)Room That Should "Unsettle" Us

9 Elephants in the (Class)Room That Should "Unsettle" Us | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
At a recent morning workshop for school leaders at a fairly small New England public school district, about an hour into
Gordon Shupe's insight:
This is truth!
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Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies | Educational Technology: Policy & Government | Scoop.it
New evidence of a "mode effect" on 2014-15 PARCC exams prompts a fresh look at research on the comparability of computer- and paper-based assessments.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

As a technology advocate and technology specialist at a 1:1 school, I have been following this 'dirty little secret' for a number of years now. As we celebrate the new things we can do with technology and how much more immediate assessment results are with computer-based testing, we should not be deceived into thinking everything is better with computers. This is particularly alarming when we are still in the beginning stages of a 1:1 initiative.

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