Educational Technology in Higher Education
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Educational Technology in Higher Education
A scoop it magazine focusing on educational technology in higher education.
Curated by Mark Smithers
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UC will open its research to the public -- for free

UC will open its research to the public -- for free | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Faculty leaders at the University of California have passed an Open Access Policy, the largest university to do so; articles published after Nov. 1 will be available on a public website.
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Aaron Swartz Was Right - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Aaron Swartz Was Right - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The current academic publishing system is prettied-up extortion. He defied it, and the rest of us should too.

Via Smithstorian
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Smithstorian's curator insight, February 27, 2013 11:04 AM

NOTE: Be sure to read the lively discussion in the COMMENTS section below the article. Also, The Chronicle says that even though the "Premium Content" key shows in the top of the article it should be open and available to all so if it isn't just write to them for access (this came out in the comments).

 

 

The suicide of the Internet wunderkind Aaron Swartz has given rise to a great deal of discussion, much of it centered on whether the penalty sought against him by the prosecutor was proportional to his "crime."

 

The consensus so far has been that Swartz did something wrong by accessing and releasing millions of academic papers from the JSTOR archive. But perhaps it is time to ask whether Swartz did in fact act wrongly. We might entertain the possibility that Swartz's act of civil disobedience was an attempt to help rectify a harm that began long ago. Perhaps he was not only justified in his actions but morally impelled to act as he did. Moreover, we too might be morally impelled to take action.

 

To put it bluntly, the current state of academic publishing is the result of a series of strong-arm tactics enabling publishers to pry copyrights from authors, and then charge exorbitant fees to university libraries for access to that work. The publishers have inverted their role as disseminators of knowledge and become bottlers of knowledge, releasing it exclusively to the highest bidders. Swartz simply decided it was time to take action.

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Information wants to be free, but the world isn't ready

Information wants to be free, but the world isn't ready | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Every few years, one of my friends from the early days of digital enthusiasm turns up on the media’s radar as a "defector." Huzzah! The former advocate or progenitor of the Next New Thing has...

Via Smithstorian, Keith Hampson PhD
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Smithstorian's curator insight, January 24, 2013 11:54 AM

Every few years, one of my friends from the early days of digital enthusiasm turns up on the media’s radar as a “defector.” Huzzah! The former advocate or progenitor of the Next New Thing has turned into a flaming critic. Perhaps he or she has even issued a jeremiad against the former Great Hope of All Humanity. It’s a turnkey, media-ready narrative, easy to convey and easy for a low-attention reading public to digest: He was for it. Now he’s agin’ it. You can tweet that and have enough characters left over for a haiku.

 

Jaron Lanier, who emerged into the media spotlight in the early ’90s as the chief spokesperson for Virtual Reality, seems to be having a longer — and more vocal — run at this sort of thing than most. In “Half A Manifesto,” published in Wired (2000), Lanier struck out against what he saw as a cybernetic totalism wherein some techno enthusiasts were laboring to create our nonbiological replacement species. You Are Not A Gadget (2011) went a bit further into “fighting the future,” exploring the ways in which Web 2.0 disruption depersonalized or was economically unfair to “creatives.” The latest chapter of this saga, “What Turned Jaron Lanier Against the Web,” is the much-ballyhooed portrait by Ron Rosenbaum for Smithsonian Magazine that portrays Jaron as being like a “spy who came in from the cold.”

 
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Open Access and the Duty of Higher Education

Open Access and the Duty of Higher Education | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
There simply is no supportable argument to not make academic publications open access. It is simple and easy to do, and it requires minimal effort.
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Launching Meta EdTech Journal

The other day I was trying to find a list of Open Access journals. I found this very useful open list from George Veletsianos. While looking through the journals it occurred to me that what would be useful would be...
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Open Access

Open Access | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
GRIEF ANGER LOSS January 11, 2013 Aaron Swartz committs suicide. The year 2013 starts on a somber note, an open wound. I never met Aaron but I found it interesting to learn he was involved with the...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 11, 2013 10:21 PM

For me Aaron Swartz’s suicide led to introspection and this exploration of open access. Writing this post has been a kind of eulogy and a revelation. Higher education has often been defined as having three distinct functions – research, teaching, and community service. As I see things now open access is central to research, open educational resources to teaching, and the overall principles of open the basis of community service.

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Open access plans are 'attack on academic freedoms' - Telegraph

Open access plans are 'attack on academic freedoms' - Telegraph | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Leading historians have accused ministers of an "attack on academic freedoms" over plans to make research freely available to the public.

Via Peter Mellow
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Openness has won - now what?

Openness has won - now what? | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
As we start the new year and survey the open education landscape, it's hard not to conclude that openness has prevailed. The victory may not be absolute, but the trend is all one way now - we'll never go back...
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Startup challenges textbook market by packaging open access materials | Inside Higher Ed

Startup challenges textbook market by packaging open access materials | Inside Higher Ed | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Textbook publishers have almost boundless disdain for Boundless Learning, and it's not hard to see why.

The company, which unveiled an upgraded, public iteration of its software Wednesday after a year in beta, offers college students free, open versions of textbooks that would normally cost them scores if not hundreds of dollars. It describes what it does as "textbook replacement."

 

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Exploring open access in higher education: live chat best bits

Exploring open access in higher education: live chat best bits | Educational Technology in Higher Education | Scoop.it
What is the benefit of open access to academia? Who will pay for open education resources?
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