Educational Pedagogy
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Can A Test Measure This? -

Can A Test Measure This? - | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Can A Test Measure This? Personality Qualities Not Measured By Tests by Terry Heick Woe to the standardized test, bastard child of ed reform and a dated and industrialized approach learning. Damning evidence of the failure of our collective imagination to design ways to help children come to understand [...]

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Educational Pedagogy
View related curated articles on 1) Dimensions of Education in a Multicultural Society at https://paper.li/e-1491113960#/ and on 2) Flipboard / Educational Pedagogy at http://flip.it/UMicoh
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What we lose by reading 100,000 words every day

What we lose by reading 100,000 words every day | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, October 19, 7:54 AM

"While neuroplasticity allowed humans to develop our “deep-reading circuit,” she explains, it also makes us vulnerable to constant streams of digital input. Clutching cellphones, scrolling through Instagram feeds, browsing websites all day, “we inhabit a world of distraction,” she writes.

 

 
 
By Jennifer Howard
October 4

Jennifer Howard is a writer and editor living in Washington, D.C.

Rereading a favorite book is a pleasure and skill, one of many that neuroscientist Maryanne Wolf fears we might be losing in this era of screen immersion. In “Reader, Come Home,” she recounts an experiment she did on herself: She tried to reread Hermann Hesse’s “Magister Ludi,” a novel she calls “one of the most influential books of my earlier years.”


(Harper)

Her first attempt did not go well. “My grafted, spasmodic, online style, while appropriate for much of my day’s ordinary reading, had been transferred indiscriminately to all of my reading, rending my former immersion in more difficult texts less and less satisfying,” she writes. Wolf soon tried again, forcing herself to start with 20-minute intervals, and managed to recover her “former reading self.”

But the vexed question behind the experiment — “What would now become of the reader I had been?” — winds throughout “Reader, Come Home.”

[It’s not just about reducing screen time: a rethinking of how we view kids]

Wolf wants to understand what’s happening to our reading brains at this historic juncture between the old ways and the new. A lifelong book lover who turned her fascination with reading into a career as a cognitive neuroscientist, she continues to explore how humans learned to do such an astonishing thing as read in the first place.

 

Unlike sight and vision, as Wolf explained in her 2007 book, “Proust and the Squid,” the ability to read did not naturally evolve in humans. In her new book, she explores neuroplasticity — the amazing adaptability of our brains — and sketches out the “neurological circus” set in motion when a reader encounters words. She compares the many elements that reading sets in motion — vision, language, cognition — to the interactions among the performers in a three-ring circus. Wolf pushes the analogy harder than she needs to, but it does convey a sense of the neurological acrobatics the reading brain performs.

While neuroplasticity allowed humans to develop our “deep-reading circuit,” she explains, it also makes us vulnerable to constant streams of digital input. Clutching cellphones, scrolling through Instagram feeds, browsing websites all day, “we inhabit a world of distraction,” she writes.

One of many useful studies she cites found that the average person “consumes about 34 gigabytes across varied devices each day” — some 100,000 words’ worth of information. “Neither deep reading nor deep thinking can be enhanced by the aptly named ‘chopblock’ of time we are all experiencing, or by 34 gigabytes of anything per day,” Wolf argues. That’s true enough. I did a quick Google search — one of many digital detours I made as I wrote this review — and learned that “Middlemarch” contains about 316,000 words. Even in grad school I would have gotten very little out of the novel if I’d sped-read a third of it in 24 hours.

 

Wolf sees good reason to be alarmed, but “Reader, Come Home” veers away from despair over the life digital. This isn’t Nicholas G. Carr’s “The Shallows.” Wolf thinks (hopes) that a “biliterate brain” will evolve in young humans, who could learn to develop “distinctly different modes of reading from the outset.” She wants kids to become “expert code switchers,” able to move among media and from light reading to deep analysis and back again the way bilingual people switch between languages. We can hope.

Practical interventions will be necessary. Wolf recommends that early-childhood education continue to focus on print materials, with digital devices and lessons added over time. That includes how to code — essential for learning “that sequence matters,” whether it’s in a piece of writing or a piece of software — and how to handle time and distractions. (Sign me up.) Wolf calls for teachers to be better trained to use technology effectively in classrooms. Handing out iPads does not teach children how to read well on those devices or manage time on them. That requires active guidance from adults in the classroom and at home. She also wants more (and is involved in) research on how best to support learners, including people with dyslexia, who are not served by traditional approaches to literacy. It’s one of the brightest prospects sparked by the digital leap.

[Is our screen-time anxiety more detrimental than screen time?]

 

Digital technology can perpetuate inequalities as well as solve them. Not every kid grows up with books in the house; not every kid has access to a computer or the Internet either. And that’s only the first hurdle, as Wolf knows. “Merely having access does not ensure a child’s ability to use digital devices in positive ways,” she writes.

Even as it keeps one eye on the future, “Reader, Come Home” embodies some old-fashioned reading pleasures, with quotes from Italo Calvino, John Dunne, Toni Morrison, Marcel Proust, Elie Wiesel and other illustrious word-workers. It unfolds as a series of letters addressed to “Dear Reader” from “Your Author,” a call to remember that books come alive as exchanges between writers and readers.

That structure can make “Reader, Come Home” feel — in a corny but charming way — like a throwback to an era already gone, if it ever existed. Wolf offers a persuasive catalog of the cognitive and social good created by deep reading, but does not really acknowledge that the ability to read well has never been universal.

 

Still, she makes a sound case that if we don’t protect and cultivate what Dunne called the “quiet eye,” we could not only lose the pleasures of reading but also hasten the erosion of core democratic values, already under siege in American public and private life. She worries that we now lack the “cognitive patience” necessary to identify fake news and to entertain points of view very different from our own. That makes the ailing body politic more vulnerable to demagogues, white supremacists, Russian hackers and other poisonous influences. (Disclosure: Wolf quotes from a relevant essay I wrote, “Internet of Stings,” published in the Times Literary Supplement in 2016.)

In “Reader, Come Home,” Wolf spells out what needs protecting: the knowledge, analytical thinking, capacity for sustained attention and empathy for others inspired by immersion in books. She’s right that digital media doesn’t automatically doom deep reading and can even enhance it. She’s also correct that we have a lot to lose — all of us — if we don’t pay attention to what we’re doing with technology and what it’s doing to us.

 
 

Wolf sees good reason to be alarmed, but “Reader, Come Home” veers away from despair over the life digital. This isn’t Nicholas G. Carr’s “The Shallows.” Wolf thinks (hopes) that a “biliterate brain” will evolve in young humans, who could learn to develop “distinctly different modes of reading from the outset.” She wants kids to become “expert code switchers,” able to move among media and from light reading to deep analysis and back again the way bilingual people switch between languages. We can hope.

Practical interventions will be necessary. Wolf recommends that early-childhood education continue to focus on print materials, with digital devices and lessons added over time. That includes how to code — essential for learning “that sequence matters,” whether it’s in a piece of writing or a piece of software — and how to handle time and distractions. (Sign me up.) Wolf calls for teachers to be better trained to use technology effectively in classrooms. Handing out iPads does not teach children how to read well on those devices or manage time on them. That requires active guidance from adults in the classroom and at home. She also wants more (and is involved in) research on how best to support learners, including people with dyslexia, who are not served by traditional approaches to literacy. It’s one of the brightest prospects sparked by the digital leap.

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Here Is A Collection of Some Good Educational Resources for Social Studies Teachers via Educators' tech 

Here Is A Collection of Some Good Educational Resources for Social Studies Teachers via Educators' tech  | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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Centering Teaching: the Human Work of Higher Education

Most higher education teaching practices are unexamined, because teachers are rarely given space to think critically about pedagogy. We need departments of hig…

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My university forced me into teaching training. It was all dry 'eduspeak' | Anonymous academic | Education | The Guardian

My university forced me into teaching training. It was all dry 'eduspeak' | Anonymous academic | Education | The Guardian | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
I’d like to be a great lecturer, but I don’t think theory divorced from classroom context will make me one

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Here's why you need to separate praise from feedback

Here's why you need to separate praise from feedback | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Ideally, recognition demonstrates genuine appreciation for the employee as a human being, not just his contributions. Feedback is a way to shape future behaviors for improved results.
Both recognition and feedback are important aspects of the leader-team member relationship. When you conflate the two, you create confusion and resentment. Let’s go back to Jim for a moment. If you have two pieces of information to give Jim—one that praises and one that requests a different behavior -- you need to create space between the delivery of the two points.

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The Encouragement Resistant Writers Need :: Mark Overmeyer

The Encouragement Resistant Writers Need :: Mark Overmeyer | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
One truth I have learned about resistant writers has helped me more than any other: Many are better at resisting than they are at writing because they have practiced resistance. To change this pattern, we need to move these students in the opposite direction and help them practice writing.

Our initial response to resistant students is important. "I've tried everything, but if they won't write, I can't do anything about it," I've often thought to myself. This kind of negative thinking assumes that the writer cannot change.

Instead, when we take an inquiry stance, we are more likely to support a positive change. When we see resistance as an opportunity to learn more about our students, we are more likely to provide meaningful support. Try thinking to yourself, "I wonder why this writer resists so much. Some days are better for him than others. What do I need to know about this writer to help him write more?"

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How To Increase Learning Transfer

How To Increase Learning Transfer | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Find out 5 ways to increase learning transfer in your courses.

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Write the Perfect Discussion Board Post in Your Online College Course

Write the Perfect Discussion Board Post in Your Online College Course | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Students who enroll in online degree programs may be concerned that they will miss out on the interaction that is found in traditional degree programs. However, these students still benefit from class discussions through online discussion boards, which allow them to create original posts about a course topic and respond to the posts of other students. This guide provides information on what students can expect when using an online discussion board, the etiquette to follow on these boards, and how professors grade the posts students make.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 28, 3:26 PM

Anyone taking (or teaching) an online course will benefit from reading this article. Even if you know it all,  take a look... you just might find something new. 

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Relationships: Teacher's "I Need" Box Gets Kids to Ask For Help

Relationships: Teacher's "I Need" Box Gets Kids to Ask For Help | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Julia Brown was determined to get it right this school year, so she tried something new – a cardboard "I Need" box. It began as a way for her students to ask for help without having to come directly to her. They'd write it on a card and leave it in the box, and she'd get back to them before the week was over.

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10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds

10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds

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‘The future of training’ or The elephant that swallowed the room –

‘The future of training’ or The elephant that swallowed the room – | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
This is a copy of the guest blog I wrote for the International House Teacher Training Blog here. The IH ‘Future of Training’ Conference (23-24 November 2018) will mark 65 years of teacher training at IH London, the ancestral home of the initial ELT certification course that later became the Cambridge CELTA. It promises both…

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Building a culture of continuous improvement, learning & development at work – Modern Workplace Learning Magazine

Building a culture of continuous improvement, learning & development at work – Modern Workplace Learning Magazine | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it

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25 Of The Most Misunderstood Ideas In Education -

25 Of The Most Misunderstood Ideas In Education - | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
25 Of The Most Misunderstood Ideas In Education by Terry Heick There’s a lot of misunderstanding in education, and that makes sense because it’s an ‘industry’ with tremendous external pressure to change but an extraordinary kind of inertia internally that keeps it from doing so. Teaching is also a fundamentally human craft (and learning a …

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Personal Learning vs Personalized Learning: What Needs to Happen

Online Learning 2018, Toronto, Ontario, Contact North. This special briefing explores personal learning as the future of learning, explores why it'

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The missing half of training

The missing half of training | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it

The training industry is based on models that were developed for the military. The Systems Approach to Training includes the ADDIE [analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation] model, with variations used throughout industry. Robert Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction inform much of instructional design. Gagne’s early work was in military training. Other models were developed in the second half of the 20th century but they mostly remained in line with their military roots. One model for instructional design that I promote is Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping. It’s a welcome change, but is focused on individual training.

In the military there is much more training than individual, skill & knowledge-focused, course work. There is also ‘collective training’. Collective training is what military units do when they are not on operations. Collective training is run by operators, not trainers, and is informal, social, with an emphasis on simulation. Types of simulation can range from expensive highly technical combat mission flight simulators, to distributed war games, or command post exercises involving thousands of personnel.


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6 Critical Thinking Assessment Rubrics for Measuring What Matters

6 Critical Thinking Assessment Rubrics for Measuring What Matters | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
If you want to consider the possibilities around critical thinking assessment, these rubrics will get you inspired and excited about doing just that.

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Research-Based Strategies: Part 2 by  Lori Gracey

Research-Based Strategies: Part 2 by  Lori Gracey | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
by Lori Gracey

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Nelly Alysse Hernandez-Gurrola's curator insight, October 15, 5:06 PM
This article is about 9 research-based strategies for students in the classroom. It gives rationale about each strategy and how it works.
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All of the feels: How brands use the four basic emotions in advertising 

All of the feels: How brands use the four basic emotions in advertising  | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Learn how brands use the four core human emotions in advertising to influence buying behavior...."


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25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy

25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy

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How People Learn

A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine highlights the dynamic process of learning throughout the life span.

This presentation highlights the findings of that report, quoted directly from the report.

https://www.downes.ca/post/68693

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Opinion | Are You a Visual or an Auditory Learner? It Doesn’t Matter

Opinion | Are You a Visual or an Auditory Learner? It Doesn’t Matter | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
One mental strategy may be much better suited than another to a particular task.

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Learning to Love and Loving to Learn Mathematics  free pdf

McDonald Betty: Learning to Love and Loving to Learn Mathematics
Author: McDonald Betty
Number of Pages: 136 pages
Published Date: 27 Jan 2014
Publisher: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing
Publication Country: United States
Language: English
ISBN: 9783659519369
Download Link: http://ebook.getpdf.pw/book?res=scoopnew&isbn=9783659519369&keyword=Learning+to+Love+and+Loving+to+Learn+Mathematics



Loving Mathematics is all about loving mathematics! This book examines how a love for mathematics can lead to amazing success in several different areas of life. Drawing from over 40 years academic experience, the author discusses how teachers can make a conscious and deliberate effort to create in their students a lifetime love for mathematics. Situated in a reflective context, the book explores how caregivers can unearth hidden talents and realise the self-fulfilling prophecy. By paying close attention to details and providing timely affirmation and appropriate attention teachers can help their students learn to love and love to learn mathematics. Relating real life situations in mathematical terminology and seeking opportunities to engage in ongoing mathematical conversations have transformative impacts on students. Quieting the inner negative voices and awakening the rational positive voices can change drudgery into pleasure. This book would show you how to minimise the unconscious negative influences of past failure and generational curses, and give way to self-awareness, self-efficacy and success. To miss reading this book is to do yourself a grave disservice. Enjoy!

download torrent, paperback, iPhone, free ebook, book review, fb2, pocket, mobi, McDonald Betty facebook,iOS, facebook, for PC, download book, download ebook, download torrent, rar paperback Learning to Love and Loving to Learn Mathematics by McDonald Betty for PC,ebook pdf, Learning to Love and Loving to Learn Mathematics kindle,ebook, epub download, download epub, kindle, Read online, free pdf, download pdf, for mac, iPad, zip,

http://pubboubenzukud.blogdiario.com/1536673029/
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Math Curriculum Inadequate to Common Core Expectations

Math Curriculum Inadequate to Common Core Expectations | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"According to a new report  by RAND Corp., most of the curriculum being used by teachers for math instruction during the 2015–2016 school year failed to align with the Common Core State Standards. Also, the teachers couldn't always identify the approaches and content that aligned with their state standards for math. The report's conclusion: Teachers need a better understanding of the standards if they're going to be successful in having students engage in practices aligning with them.

"The RAND report gave a web-based survey in spring 2016 to a teacher panel made up of a nationally representative sample of American K–12 public school teachers. The 1,718 respondents (out of a pool of 3,524) were asked about their understanding of their states' mathematics standards, practices aligned with their standards and the curriculum materials they use to implement them."


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The Three-Step System For Getting Students to Do the Talking

The Three-Step System For Getting Students to Do the Talking | Educational Pedagogy | Scoop.it
I remember the first time I heard the phrase "student-centered classroom" and I almost chuckled. I had always believed my classroom was about the students, they were the reason we taught and my focus was always

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Rescooped by Dennis Swender from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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The Global Math Project 2018

Join more than 2 million students, teachers, and friends that already have tried this astounding mathematical experience! See mathematics like you’ve never seen it before and take part in a global math conversation with your students.

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