Educational Leadership and Technology
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Children struggle to hold pencils due to too much tech, doctors say | Society | The Guardian

Children struggle to hold pencils due to too much tech, doctors say | Society | The Guardian | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Children need opportunities to develop hand strength and dexterity needed to hold pencils
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we introduce and use new tools, there will be unintended consequences. Good research helps inform how we mighr deal with these consequences i.e. play with blocks, drawing, use of fingers and hands, etc.

This is not a physical dexterity issue, but other research has shown how it can be a mental dexterity issue.
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Laptops in Class are the New Second-Hand Smoke

Laptops in Class are the New Second-Hand Smoke | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Paul A. Kirschner OK; I’ve covered taking notes with or without laptops and whether people learn better if they read from paper or screen. This is the third blog in an apparent, unplanned, trilogy. Disclaimer: Let’s sketch/frame the situation so there are no misunderstandings. Yes, I know that using a computer (e.g., laptop, tablet, smartphone)…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The blog begins with a disclaimer that it is not a call for the ban of laptops and computers in classrooms.

Technology is a practical wisdom and conversation about, with, and through the tools we use as craftspeople. It is not about the tools alone. Understood this way choices about computers and laptops become situational and contextual.
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Thinking about thinking about what to do about technology

A number of events in 2017 have caused more people to do what few people have done until now — ask whether mechanisms and media billions of people have adopted enthusiastically might be more harmful…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Technology is not what we think it is. Technology (techne + logos) is a way of thinking and conversation about, with, and through tools we use as craftspeople.

A tool poorly understood and used is not useful. It reminds me of Abraham Maslow's quote: "If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail."
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Stewardship in the "Age of Algorithms" | Lynch | First Monday

Stewardship in the "Age of Algorithms"
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What is the human role in algorithms and their use in machine learning, AI, and untapped developments?

The pace of change is such that we cannot abdicate human responsibilities to that queston. Technology (techne+logos) is a wisdom and conversation about, with, and through our tools.
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The tech industry needs a moral compass – Doteveryone – Medium

The tech industry needs a moral compass – Doteveryone – Medium | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Not just to deal with the uncertainties of the future, but to navigate how platforms, products and services are playing out in the present.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is people within an industry who need moral compasses. When we conflate industries and systems with people, we give people a pass on their behaviour.
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What happened when I made my students turn off their phones – Joelle Renstrom | Aeon Ideas

What happened when I made my students turn off their phones – Joelle Renstrom | Aeon Ideas | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
As a teacher who has long witnessed and worried about the impacts of technology in the classroom, I constantly struggle to devise effective classroom policies for smartphones. I used to make students sing or dance if their phones interrupte

Via Martin Debattista
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
With time, the teacher/professor discovered choice was the vital point in his experiment. Technology does not mean tool. It is a thoughtful conversation (techne + logos) about, with, and through one's tools. This includes wise choices. How do our students learn to choose and be responsible for those choices?

We have excised the word of its broader meaning. Even the etymology of the word tool, decribes usefulness (in French it is outil).
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Why pedagogy first, tech second stance is key to the future

Why pedagogy first, tech second stance is key to the future | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"As districts across the country purchase technology at a feverish pace, they must ensure they have a solid implementation plan ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Pedagogy and pedagogic relationships are essential to teaching. Technology is a conversation about, with, and through ones' tools. It is about choosing the right tools for the job, therefore contextual.
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Technology Can Be A Tool, A Teacher, A Trickster

Technology Can Be A Tool, A Teacher, A Trickster | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Shaping technology to some form of learning could depart pretty radically from the more familiar aim of shaping technology to the way we are now, says psychologist Tania Lombrozo.
Via Martin Debattista
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am not sure technology is a tool, teacher, or trickster. The etymology of technoloy means a conversation with, about, and through a craftsperson's tools. It takes wisdom to use one's tools well.
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Learning in the digital age - theory and practice

Learning technology is just about everywhere in education. Universities are replete with lecture capture tools, interactive media, web based content and person…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Jim Lerman, Sarantis Chelmis
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We have been preparing children for a future we cannot fully describe for some time and how new tools might disrupt that future.

John Dewey argued habits and skills were learned in the present moment where children lived. Technology is a conversation between craftspeople, in this case teachers and students, and their tools.
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, June 27, 2017 10:02 AM

I'd add another layer - mobile learning - into this solid slide deck, but worth the flipping. Learning in a smartphone empowered age is different as this presentation deck makes clear. 

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, June 30, 2017 10:32 AM

Excellent graphics illustrating his creative ideas-I looked at all 74 of the slides! I especially like the images of two paths

Debbie Elicksen 's curator insight, July 3, 2017 2:32 PM
Curricula is evolving, one classroom at a time.
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Confessions of a Luddite professor

Confessions of a Luddite professor | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
I had the good fortune on Wednesday to hear economist Robert Gordon talk about his magnum opus, “The Rise and Fall of American Economic Growth.” Gordon has a somber tale to tell. He argues that U.S. economic growth ain’t what it used to be, and that ain’t gonna change over the next 25 years. This is due to myriad headwinds such as demographic slowdowns, rising inequality, fiscal constraints, and — most important — the failure of newer technologies to jumpstart economic growth the way that the Second Industrial Revolution did.

[U.S. economy slows, with GDP growing 0.5% in first quarter]

It’s his last point — about the effect of information technology on productivity — that prompts so much fierce debate. Economists are furiously debating whether the visible innovations in the information sector are leading to productivity advances that are going undetected in the current productivity statistics. On the one hand, the aggregate data suggests a serious productivity slowdown over the past decade. On the other hand, Google’s chief economist, Hal Varian, insists that “there is a lack of appreciation for what’s happening in Silicon Valley, because we don’t have a good way to measure it.”

Surely, there are sectors, such as higher education, in which technological innovations can yield significant productivity gains, right? All that talk about MOOCs and flipped classrooms and the like will make a difference in productivity, yes?

As an optimist, I’ve long resisted Gordon’s argument — but this is one area where I’m beginning to suspect that he’s right and Silicon Valley is wrong.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Data is raw information that has to be interpreted and judged as to what it means. The risk we run with digital technologies, including the Internet, is that we present data as meaningful without thoughtful consideration. It is why teachers remain vital to the educational enterprise.
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The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education)

The Ideology of the Blockchain (for Education) | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
All digital technology is ideological. All education technology is ideological.

I repeat this (and quite often, it seems) because technology – and ed-tech in particular – is too frequently discussed as though it is ideology-free. It purports to be at once (and, yet, incongruously) both neutral and necessary. It presents itself at once as value-free (and, yet, incongruously) progressive. That is to say, if technology contains any ideological underpinning at all, we’re supposed to believe, it’s that its forward march is quite inevitable; but that’s okay as it is forward movement – technology serves to make the world better.

This sort of end-of-history, post-ideology ideology that permeates digital technologies (conveniently) frames challenges and criticisms and questions as “ideological” in which “ideological” here means politically-loaded, polemical, biased, bad.

That’s not what I mean when I write that digital technology is ideological or that education technology is ideological. I don’t mean simply that these are interwoven with a certain politics or that they represent developments that I find personally disagreeable. Rather, “ideology” as I use the word refers to the ideas, values, and practices – discourse and power – grounded in the forces of production (e.g. global capitalism) and in the institutions that re-inscribe these. “Ideology” is one way we can think about social struggles, especially as various groups try to legitimate their own interests and do so in such a way that their ideas, values, and practices are seen as natural.

Technologies, particularly the new computer and communications technologies of the twentieth century onward, help reinforce dominant ideology in powerful ways, but these technologies also have their own ideological underpinnings as well, ones that serve in turn to justify and reinforce the cultural and economic changes that society is currently undergoing. Think “Sharing Economy,” for example. This is also, in part at least, what Neil Postman famously described over twenty years ago as the growing pervasiveness of “Technopoly”:

Technopoly eliminates alternatives to itself in precisely the way Aldous Huxley outlined in Brave New World. It does not make them illegal. It does not make them immoral. It does not even make them unpopular. It makes them invisible and therefore irrelevant. And it does so by redefining what we mean by religion, by art, by family, by politics, by history, by truth, by privacy, by intelligence, so that our definitions fit its new requirements. Technopoly, in other words, is totalitarian technocracy.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a series of articles that deal with the use of digital technologies in schools. What does it mean? The articles draw on new (Neil Selwyn) thinkers and some that were writing at the early stages of the digital revoluation (Neil Postman). However, you can go back further and read concerns expressed by Heidegger, Arendt, Gadamer, Derrida, etc. and more recently: Turkle and others.

Technology is a conversation between a craftsperson and their tools.
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This Time – Technology Matters but Teachers Still Matter More!

This Time – Technology Matters but Teachers Still Matter More! | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Tom D'Amico, the Superintendent of Human Resources with the Ottawa Catholic School Board, discusses how his district has met the needs of today's digital learner by focusing on the relationship and scaling of personal networks. Teachers do not dump kids in front of devices. Instead they receive yearly instruction on digital citizenship to model behaviors for students and use researched-based practices to help students learn.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Teachers are who vivify topics and learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Digital, connected and mobile

Digital, connected and mobile | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

"In today’s digitally connected world, using technology to improve education institutions and processes is not a question of if, but of when and how.

Strategic technology suggested:

1. Adaptive learning

2 Adaptive e-textbooks

3. Customer relationship management (CRM)

4. Big data

5. Sourcing strategies

6. Exostructure

7. Open microcredentials

8. Digital assessment

9. Mobile

10. Social learning


Via Leona Ungerer, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

It is more a question of how. There is a lot of neo-liberal thinking in this article i.e relationship management. Is that what we want?

 

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Plato Would Have Wanted You to Unplug –

I’m in my mid-thirties, which means my social media feed is full of pictures of tonight’s dinner, links to obituaries for 80’s celebrities, and angst-filled articles about how kids these days are…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The point of understanding what a pharmakon is points us towards what it means to use things in moderation. That was Plato's point. More recently, Jacques Derrida used the phrase in a similar manner. There is always good and point. Humans need to find ways to integrate tools into their lives in ways that serve humans.

Are digital tools addictive? Sherry Turkle suggests we should avoid the word addictive. The challenge becomes how do we use our tools in moderation? Technology (techne + logos) is about wise use of tools.
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5 Risks Posed by the Increasing Misuse of Technology in Schools

5 Risks Posed by the Increasing Misuse of Technology in Schools | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The greatest fear of parents and teachers is that the tech industry wants to replace teachers with computers. They fear that the business leaders want to cut costs by replacing expensive humans with inexpensive machines, that never require health care or a pension. They believe that education requires human interaction. They prefer experience, wisdom, judgment, sensibility, sensitivity and compassion in the classroom to the cold, static excellence of a machine.

Via Nik Peachey
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a Diane Ravitch article. Teaching is relational and adds the human touch computers never can.

There are likely more than five risks. For example, the picture looks and I guess feels like a "traditional" classroom with desks in neat orderly rows.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, January 4, 4:22 AM

Interesting reading.

Mary Galleno's curator insight, January 4, 7:18 AM
Technology
magnus sandberg's curator insight, January 5, 2:57 AM
Interesting read on some real risks of technology in school. Note that the real risk here is the new stakeholders who's goals are for themselves, not for the students. 
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Educators: We Need More from Education Technology

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Education technology is pitched as a cure-all for the many problems plaguing K-12 education, though rarely do new technologies move the needle in any significant way – and they often come at a steep price."

When we treat technology as tools, we miss what its essence is: a craftsperson's conversation about, with, and through their tools. It is practical wisdom on how to use those tools. We accept a one-size-fits-all approach in unquestioned and taken-for-granted ways.

The challenge is to engage teacher and student voice in the process of change, whatever that might be.
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Did technology kill the truth?

Did technology kill the truth? | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
We carry in our pockets and purses the greatest democratizing tool ever developed. Never before has civilization possessed such an instrument of free expression. Yet, that unparalleled technology h…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The short answer is no. What digital tools have done is amplified the telling of lies and the narcissim of those who thing it is all about them. We do not live in a post-truth society. We need to be better than we are at times, particularly those in positions of power.
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The digital divide is much wider than you think

The digital divide is much wider than you think | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Official site of The Week Magazine, offering commentary and analysis of the day's breaking news and current events as well as arts, entertainment, people and gossip, and political cartoons.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The third leg of the digital access, digital skills, is the one that is most often forgotten and taken-for-granted. If we have access and the tool, do we have the skills to use it? That begins with understanding technology (techne + logos) is a thoughtful conversation about, with, and through our tools. It is not limited to the digital.
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Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, November 16, 2017 10:33 PM
The third leg of the digital access, digital skills, is the one that is most often forgotten and taken-for-granted. If we have access and the tool, do we have the skills to use it? That begins with understanding technology (techne + logos) is a thoughtful conversation about, with, and through our tools. It is not limited to the digital.
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More Or Less Technology In The Classroom? We’re Asking The Wrong Question

More Or Less Technology In The Classroom? We’re Asking The Wrong Question | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Neither technophobia or technophilia is the right solution for our students. The real issue is the process of learning.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There should be more, but that assumes we move past a simple, narrow definition of technolo gy. Technology is from the Greek meaning art (techne) and logos (logic and word), suggesting it is conversation. Heidegger concluded it is a conversation between a craftsperson and their tools.

We want more conversation between teachers, as craftspeople, with, through, and about their tools.
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Technological and Human Metaphors and Their Impact on Education

Technological and Human Metaphors and Their Impact on Education | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Recently, I woke up thinking about language, how it can reflect and shape our beliefs and values. When we use contemporary metaphors about technology, for example, to describe the human brain, some can look at that as what a missionary might call contextualization. We are using the language of the day to communicate an important truth. However, modern metaphors are not neutral. They don’t just help us explain. They also change how we understand something. As such, there are important considerations when we start to describe the human experience using technological metaphors, and when we begin to describe the technological using human metaphors or language associated with the human experience.

Cell phones do not die. Computers do not have memory. I’m sorry Descartes, but the human body is not a machine. I am not suggesting that it is wrong to use such metaphors, but they are also not without influence on our individual and collective understanding of self and the world. Such language might even contribute to our treating people more like machines, treating machines more like humans or living creatures, or finding ourselves increasingly content with technological substitutes for the fundamental truth about human needs implicit in the words, “It is not good for man to be alone.” We are relational beings. Without creating some new set of man-made laws or moral boundaries, I suspect that we are wise to become more intentional about the use of language that draws us toward what it means to be human.

Via Miloš Bajčetić, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Technological metaphors technologize the way that we think about education, and metaphors associated with life and humanity offer us another opportunity to humanize education. This is true even as we explore the benefits of learning analytics and big data, metric-driven learning, competency-based education, computer-assisted education, blended and online learning, or a dozen other developments."

The Buddha said "what we think we become." Metaphors have a way of doing that to us. We begin to think of schools as businesses, students as consumers, and teachers as entrepreneurs. What is interesting is that technology is a conversation, not a tool in the strictest sense of the word.
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Both Humans and Technology Are Noisy: How Do We Move Forward? - Digital Promise

Both Humans and Technology Are Noisy: How Do We Move Forward? - Digital Promise | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Accelerating Innovation in Education

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is though-provoking. Heidegger used a hyphen between human and technology (human-technology, suggesting there was an ongoing conversation between a person and their tools. He used the etymology of technology to describe technology as a conversation. The challenge is we do not listen to one of the voices in the conversation.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 17, 2017 1:30 PM

This is really thought-provoking, and adds another book to my "to read" list.

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Technology increasing alienation of tertiary students

Technology increasing alienation of tertiary students | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Technology use is at an all-time high for tertiary students, including through online courses, but many still yearn for face-to-face contact with staff and fellow students.

Via Peter Mellow, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Pedagogy remains important in teaching and learning. Teaching and education are about relational language and involves leading.
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Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal

Is Your District Future Ready? -- THE Journal | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Encouraging school leaders to think deeply about equity, agency and leadership when actualizing or revisioning technology integration plans.

Via Norton Gusky, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Are we listening to classroom teachers? My experience suggests we are not. Change is just done to them.
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Norton Gusky's curator insight, April 20, 2016 3:15 PM
T.H.E. Journal looks at the National Education Technology Plan as a tool to make school systems future ready.
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A Strong Case for Uncommon Learning

A Strong Case for Uncommon Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Eric Sheninger’s newest book, Uncommon Learning, explores the necessary changes our schools must make to be more relevant for students’ needs today.

Via diane gusa
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
An interesting concept is that good teachers teach the wrong things very well.

The teachers I am interviewing tell me that teaching and learning are only separated by a thin membrane which is very permeable. What does that mean in schools, for teaching, and for learning?
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10 Tips for Teachers who Struggle with Technology

10 Tips for Teachers who Struggle with Technology | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
With technology moving out of the lab and into the classroom, it's becoming a challenge for some teachers to infuse their teaching with tech tools such as websites, educational games, simulations, ...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I treated it like a game and worked to connect my use to what I already knew. For example, I learned Power Point because I had used Hyper Studio and had some idea of what might work.

 

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LET Team's curator insight, March 18, 2015 4:10 PM

Some good tips here, I particularly like LMGTFY...Let Me Google That For You...

Skrall Jashmirt's curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:34 AM
este tema me agrada por su alto contenido, el cual nos puede beneficiar tanto alumnos como maestros. ya que el uso de la tecnologia es muy muy benefico entre nosotros
MARÍA JOSEFINA AGUILAR LEO's curator insight, March 19, 2015 2:08 PM

Importantes aspects un Tomar en Cuenta párr Quienes ESTAMOS Interesados o HEMOS Incorporado el USO de la Tecnología en Nuestras aulas