Educational Leadership and Technology
12.2K views | +1 today
Follow
Educational Leadership and Technology
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Technology in Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

The Art of the Discussion Prompt | IDDblog

The Art of the Discussion Prompt | IDDblog | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Discussions are sometimes called the engine of an online course. Discussions provide an opportunity for students to engage with the course content, with each other, and with you—the professor—simultaneously, which means they have a lot of potential for meaningful learning and high retention.

There is no guarantee that students will really apply themselves by just creating a discussion. What you get out of a discussion assignment depends on what you put into it. Here are some tips for writing your discussion prompt, selecting your settings, and participating in the discussion.

Via Dennis T OConnor, Kiruthika Ragupathi
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Dialogue and conversation have different feels than discussion which is about winning one's argument.

 

@ivon_ehd1

more...
Kiruthika Ragupathi's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:27 PM

good design advice on structuring discussions.  Follow these principles to create better discussions in your online or blended classes.

Kiruthika Ragupathi's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:45 PM

good design advice on structuring discussions. Follow these principles to create better discussions in your online or blended classes.

Doug Ward's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:47 PM

Good advice.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Rubrics, Assessment and eProctoring in Higher Education
Scoop.it!

10 Assessment Design Tips for Increasing Online Student Retention, Satisfaction and Learning

10 Assessment Design Tips for Increasing Online Student Retention, Satisfaction and Learning | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
How much time do we put into the design of the assessment plans in our online courses? Is most of that time focused upon summative graded assignments that factor into the course grade? Or, do they also include opportunity for practice and informal feedback?

Via Dennis T OConnor, Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

They make sense, but ask teachers about authentic assessment. It is still thought of as an isolated activity where the student does their project alone. That is not the way of the world and has not been forever. We work and learn together. Why not assess together?

more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 24, 2014 12:32 AM

Applies to the online, blended, and traditional classroom.

Allan Shaw's curator insight, February 24, 2014 4:43 PM

Assessment should reflect purpose. We require summative assessment in our society and yet we know learners thrive, grow and develop on a diet of formative assessment. The balance is the key! Feedback and the use of authentic assessment tasks are critical positive factors.

Dr Pam Hill's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:19 AM

Wonderful article that challenges us to think through the online assessments and their prep!