Educational Leadership and Technology
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How Memory, Focus and Good Teaching Can Work Together to Help Kids Learn

How Memory, Focus and Good Teaching Can Work Together to Help Kids Learn | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Spend more time teaching learning skills. Klemm recommends memory tricks like mnemonic devices, and visualizing ideas as complex images, to help students expand their working memory. “If they knew these things, they wouldn’t have to work so hard and school might even become fun,” Klemm said. “Once students start reflecting and become more self-aware, they have the opportunity to become better students.”

“Working memory gets overloaded,” Kleem said. “Most people can only hold four independent ideas in working memory.” But if images are used to represent a constellation of ideas, people can remember much more. Words are hard to remember, but images stick with people. “It’s like a zip file,” Klemm said. “This is a way to get your working memory to carry more.”

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/category/learning-to-learn/

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

This is an interesting article with some good practical points i.e. protected learning/teaching times.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 9, 2015 12:51 PM
Spend more time teaching learning skills. Klemm recommends memory tricks like mnemonic devices, and visualizing ideas as complex images, to help students expand their working memory. “If they knew these things, they wouldn’t have to work so hard and school might even become fun,” Klemm said. “Once students start reflecting and become more self-aware, they have the opportunity to become better students.”

“Working memory gets overloaded,” Kleem said. “Most people can only hold four independent ideas in working memory.” But if images are used to represent a constellation of ideas, people can remember much more. Words are hard to remember, but images stick with people. “It’s like a zip file,” Klemm said. “This is a way to get your working memory to carry more.”


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/category/learning-to-learn/


Nancy Jones's curator insight, April 10, 2015 11:31 AM

Teaching learning will help the process. It is about the process, always; that's the life skill.. Students need to get that message, early and often.

Sm_english's curator insight, April 10, 2015 6:24 PM

Study smarter not harder

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Why Cyber Security Starts At Home

Why Cyber Security Starts At Home | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Even the grandmas on Facebook need to know and practice basic security hygiene, because what happens anywhere on the Internet can eventually affect us all.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/how-can-education-help-to-lower-cybercrime/

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/10/11/learning-basics-of-cyber-security-by-easy-to-follow-steps/

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/cyber-hygiene-ict-hygiene-for-population-education-and-business/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=A+Parent%27s+Guide+to+Cybersecurity

 

 
Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Cyber security is a joint venture for all of us involving all aspects of our lives. For students, this includes school and home. My experience was that School managers often decided they knew best.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’

Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’ | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms did not provide new outlets for the discussion of the Snowden-NSA revelations. People who thought their social media friends disagreed with them were less likely to discuss the issues in person and online.

 

Very interesting, a MUST READ!

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Who is listening? That is the key question.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:49 AM

Very interesting, a MUST READ!


Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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BYOD Pros and Cons in Education [Infographic]

BYOD Pros and Cons in Education [Infographic] | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
The BYOD Pros and Cons in Education Infographic highlights many of the advantages and disadvantages to letting students use personal devices in the classrooms.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/07/07/bring-your-own-device-advantages-dangers-and-risks/http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?q=BYOD

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

One of the unstated aspects of the emerging hidden curriculum is that we are connected 24/7 to our work. We learn this in school. Furthermore, we now provide our employers with our devices to do their work.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 9, 2014 10:54 AM


The BYOD Pros and Cons in Education Infographic highlights many of the advantages and disadvantages to letting students use personal devices in the classrooms.


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Monty Bell's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:35 AM

A balanced discussion on a very contentious issue

Hyker Security's curator insight, April 22, 2014 6:36 AM

This infographic is about BYOD in education, but I think it is applicable to most enterprise BYOD strategies.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from InformationCommunication (ICT)
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Teens, Social Media, and Privacy | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

Teens, Social Media, and Privacy | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
Youth are sharing more personal information on their profiles than in the past. They choose private settings for Facebook, but share with large networks of friends.

 

 

 

 

 

Key findings include:

 

Teens are sharing more information about themselves on their social media profiles than they did when we last surveyed in 2006:

 

- 91% post a photo of themselves, up from 79% in 2006.

 

- 71% post their school name, up from 49%.

 

- 71% post the city or town where they live, up from 61%.

 

- 53% post their email address, up from 29%.

 

- 20% post their cell phone number, up from 2%.

 


Via Gust MEES, Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Educators should be aware of this. Will there be issues or concerns down the road?

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, May 22, 2013 4:43 AM

US data but Pew Research is reputable. Privacy is a learned habit and we cannot assume younger people see the need. Maybe they will be proven correct and privacy is not required to the same degree as I feel it is and should be? Thanks Gust Mees.

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, May 22, 2013 7:58 AM

The Pew Reports are always fascinating.

Dave Webb's curator insight, May 22, 2013 11:28 AM

Youth are sharing more personal information on their profiles than in the past. They choose private settings for Facebook, but share with large networks of friends.

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Pedagogy comes first | Co-inventing the Curriculum | LEARNing To LEARN

Pedagogy comes first | Co-inventing the Curriculum | LEARNing To LEARN | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

Student empowerment is the strongest connective theme through the 55 posts and interviews I’ve conducted for this blog.  The educators I’ve interviewed all have one characteristic in common: they all enable students to take more control over and responsibility for their own learning.

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Learn more:

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

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https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page2-pdf.pdf

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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Via Gust MEES, Silvia Nascimento
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Curriculum-as-lived and currere are not new ideas. They have been forming for the last 40 years plus. We did not need digital technologies to come with this idea. It should have been firmly entrenched and it is not. 

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 4, 2015 2:40 PM

Student empowerment is the strongest connective theme through the 55 posts and interviews I’ve conducted for this blog.  The educators I’ve interviewed all have one characteristic in common: they all enable students to take more control over and responsibility for their own learning.

.

Learn more:

.

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

.

https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page2-pdf.pdf

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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RESENTICE's curator insight, March 6, 2015 8:09 AM

Le numérique au service de la pédagogie... 

Audrey's curator insight, April 3, 2015 2:51 PM

Absolutely agree, students who take responsibility for their learning do so much better when taking exams.  In addition, when  a student can teach you and put forward their own evaluative commentary, they are ready for university.

Audrey for http://www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

www.hotmoodle.com

 

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Moral Character Matters | Social Media | Education | eSkills | eCitizen

Moral Character Matters | Social Media | Education | eSkills | eCitizen | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
There’s a direct correlation between moral character and success. We lose something very important when character is treated as an afterthought.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Character

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics

 


Via Gust MEES, Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Character matters. That is challenging in the digital age. How do we know the person who is posting?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:56 AM
There’s a direct correlation between moral character and success. We lose something very important when character is treated as an afterthought.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Character


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics


Melissa Marshall's curator insight, October 22, 2014 2:14 AM
There’s a direct correlation between moral character and success. We lose something very important when character is treated as an afterthought.
 Developing moral character is something we need to address in schools - and it becomes more pertinent through the lens of social media interactions. 
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: Why Sharing Your Good Work Is Necessary, Not Boastful

Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: Why Sharing Your Good Work Is Necessary, Not Boastful | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, it's critical that we add our voices, the voices of educators, to the conversation. Whether you use social media or not, share your good work. Share the progress your learners are making. BRAG. If you don't do it, no one will!

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Sharing what we do well is important. The challenge with social media is that it is not always clear the person sharing is actually in the classroom and when they were last there.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 15, 2014 8:22 PM

However, it's critical that we add our voices, the voices of educators, to the conversation. Whether you use social media or not, share your good work. Share the progress your learners are making. BRAG. If you don't do it, no one will!


Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Transitional Kindergarten
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Posting a Child’s Life For the World to See is a Privacy Issue

Posting a Child’s Life For the World to See is a Privacy Issue | Educational Leadership and Technology | Scoop.it
As fun as it is to share all of our kids' funny stories and embarrassing mishaps, we need to think of their right to privacy and not just our right to share.

Via Gust MEES, J. Mark Schwanz
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

We have educators and educational systems posting school events under the auspices that they have permission. I watched a video the other day with an 'educator' doing just that under the auspices of being a leader.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:06 PM

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/12/21/privacy-in-the-digital-world-shouldnt-we-talk-about-it/

 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, January 4, 2014 12:14 PM

Now is the time for more public (and private) discussion about how much is enough when it comes to sharing the private lives of our loved ones. I do believe children have rights and should not be exploited by their parents or older family members.