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iSEQUENCES Autism App - Avatar Generation

iSEQUENCES Autism App - Avatar Generation | Educational Insights | Scoop.it
The Planeta Imaginario Foundation has launched an enhanced version of iSEQUENCES. This educational app for children with Autism and Asperger's syndrome enables them to practice 100 different sequences about everyday situations.

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Brian Romero Smith's curator insight, October 9, 2013 12:57 PM

Eager to try the updates.

Clive McGoun's curator insight, October 10, 2013 6:07 AM

I currently don't have an ipad to try this out - if any of the group do, then it would be great to share your thoughts about it with the class.

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For Emotional Literacy, Read Literature

For Emotional Literacy, Read Literature | Educational Insights | Scoop.it
For children struggling to express their emotions, the answer is a return to literature and the arts, says the CLAS dean.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 5, 2013 2:37 PM

This is a quite intriguing article. In a sense it is an interesting facet of one of the primary attributes given to literary reading; the idea that through its blending of vocabulary development and storytelling literature can support both creative and critical thinking. 

 

Though the article focuses upon emotional literacy in children, I couldn't help but link the core concept of the article to my concern about the abuse of those with less sophisticated emotional literacy by those who rely upon misinforming others to vote one way or another or to see only what they want to others to believe see in order to profit from those susceptible to malevolent manipulations.

And, those who would manipulate others for their own profit, in seeking points of vulnerability have discovered that it is easier to martial the "ignorant villagers with torches" via emotion rather than to engage a citizenry via critical thinking and careful analysis. 

 

The original radio broadcast upon which this  article comments focuses  on developing emotional literacy in children who have insufficient vocabulary to sort out their emotional feelings and thereby critically process those feelings. 

 

In the pre-school and primary grades, vocabulary limitations are understandable though those children who experience a significantly larger vocabulary through stories of people or anthropomorphic substitutes do in obvious ways have the ability to see and articulate 

a wider spectrum of the gray areas that make up the complex subtlties of the vast majority of human feelings and subsequent behaviors than those who see only the black and white only behaviors of the primarily good OR evil characters populating the fairy tales they hear and read. Though this is not to say that there aren't stories with a modest "gray area" between good and evil. 

 

As the very young age a bit, grade appropriate stories tend to introduce "shades of gray" characters. Our children do not get past the primary grades before they become aware of the "school bully" or the "mean girl" phenomenon or begin to interact with other kids whose parents do not draw the lines about good and bad behavior, language, values, opinions or visions of what makes for success in the same places where their own parents draw those lines for themselves. Some show early trajectories that might head off in the direction of developing an "it's a dog eat dog" world out there attitude. Others show early trajectories that might head off in the direction of it's a "we must all get along" world out there.

 

In the ideal situation kids would hear and read stories of the lives of characters beyond their direct real world encounters. They would encounter vocabulary beyond what they would experience in their direct real world encounters. They would encounter values and beliefs and frustrations and motives beyond...

 

And they would experience how others beyond those in their real world understand emotions and deal with them; including those who behave better and those who behave worse.

 

And, they would learn about mentors and about menaces.

 

And, by experiencing a vastly greater spectrum of mentors and menaces, they might develop both a greater understanding of what living a good life encompasses and a greater appreciation for caution in the face of those who have mastered the dark side of playing off of the emotional susceptibility of those who rely upon inciting the village idiots to pick up their torches in pursuit of false enemies for whom they have nothing but charlatan sourced anger and outrage. 

 

Have you notice how popular it is to accuse politicians who evolve their understanding of a complex issue as flip-floppers? 

 

Spin doctors?

 

Modern day Madmen using emotional manipulation as they phish bait for profit.  

 

Building emotional appeals through highly crafted and emotion-igniting talking points such as "death panels" belies the idea of reasoned decision making or conflict resolution.

 

Does there come a point when those insufficiently exposed to exploration of the world beyond their own; to opinions, beliefs, values beyond their own, are subject to losing both their intellectual and their emotional elasticity? That in conjunction with emotional ILLiteracy may be the viral source of a very dangerous global epidemic.

 

If so, I'd suggest it be "hardening of the (he)arteries."

 

I don't claim that literature is a panacea by any means. It's more like an important element of a healthy mental diet.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the official business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Dani Hunter's curator insight, September 9, 2013 4:50 PM

This is a wonderful article that stresses the importance of language, arts, and literature in emotional learning ability. It really gives a new perspective to teaching, not only for English teachers.

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BEA 2013: The Boy Readers Are All Right

"What boys are reading and if boys are reading are perennial topics of conversation and sources of concern, but to hear three authors discuss the topic at the Writing Genre for Boys panel at BEA last Friday, maybe we don’t need to worry so much. The conversation drifted from what the participating authors – Jack Gantos, Jon Scieszka, and Kevin Emerson – read when they were kids to the way they use humor in their writing, “reluctant readers,” and the very idea of writing “for” boys (or girls) to begin with.


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David M. Daniel's curator insight, June 19, 2013 5:43 PM

This is a topic of some concern to me, though I'd like to see a version of this topic specifically on writing for queer youth.  In the mean time, I guess the consesus seems to be "Write well, and the readers will find it no matter what sort of underpants they were"

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ALA 2013: Attracting Reluctant Male Readers

ALA 2013: Attracting Reluctant Male Readers | Educational Insights | Scoop.it

"B.A. Binns is the first speaker.  She is a writer of books about real boys and blogs for YALSA Hub. [post speaker note: she was very engaging and interesting.]Reading is not normal.  We learn to walk without being taught to walk, but reading is simply not a survival factor."


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Heather Stapleton's curator insight, July 3, 2013 1:25 AM

Becky's overview of the ALA 2013 presentation on "Attracting Reluctant Male Readers"

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PowerPoint presentations aren't helping education: Esther J. Cepeda

PowerPoint presentations aren't helping education: Esther J. Cepeda | Educational Insights | Scoop.it
Every beautifully animated presentation diligently followed the same formula: several slides, followed by an explanatory YouTube video -- of the Pythagorean theorem or the Fibonacci sequence, for instance -- and more slides.

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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:35 PM

The article once again stresses the weaknesses of PowerPoint presentations and invites the readers to return to "that old-fashioned, low-tech competence" (plain speech) that may successfully replace a bad presentation.

Shamblesguru's comment, July 28, 2013 10:38 PM
Don't shoot the messenger — it's not the tool that's the problem it's the 'toolee'
Bruce Murray's comment, July 29, 2013 6:37 PM
Bullet-point PPTs are a disaster. Print them as handouts for notetaking, but don't highlight them on stage. I agree with Shamblesguru, however - don't blame the tool. Done right, PPT can be magical.
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Embedding your prezis - quick guide

Embedding your prezis - quick guide | Educational Insights | Scoop.it

You can embed prezis to tons of different places with the help of just a simple piece of HTML code.


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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, June 30, 2013 1:42 PM

PUT your prezis in any social media networdk

Sabrinaferre's curator insight, July 1, 2013 7:57 AM

Embedding your prezis

Sandra Yeadon's curator insight, July 5, 2013 4:09 PM

For you Prezi people out there ;-)

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Bloom's Taxonomy Apps- A Great Resource Section for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Bloom's Taxonomy Apps- A Great Resource Section for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Educational Insights | Scoop.it

"Appitic is one of the app resources I have featured here in this blog in several past instances. If you are looking for a platform where to access reviews of educational apps Appitic is one option among several others to consider.

 Here is a snapshot of the Bloom's Taxonomy apps appitic has compiled for you."


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Andy Kenworthy's curator insight, September 6, 2013 4:43 PM

Very good guide, thanks for sharing. 

Suzy Hirsch's curator insight, September 7, 2013 1:06 PM

Very Helpful!

ChristopherBell's curator insight, September 29, 2013 8:06 PM

The apps are organized to help meet Bloom's Taxonomy.

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Tools for Teaching: How to Transform Direct Instruction

Tools for Teaching: How to Transform Direct Instruction | Educational Insights | Scoop.it
Summer is the time to look over those unit plans. As you reflect and rethink lessons, here's something to consider: How can you turn direct instruction into experiences where students instead dis

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Sean Corcoran's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:11 PM

An example of moving from a direct instruction lesson to a student-centred discovery lesson. 

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Great Teachers Don't Teach

Great Teachers Don't Teach | Educational Insights | Scoop.it
In a conversation on LinkedIn, one person asked, "What are the characteristics of an effective teacher?" I read quite a few excellent remarks that describe what such a teacher does to be effective.

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Sean Corcoran's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:15 PM

"Long past are the times when we teach content just in case a student might need it. A great teacher will devise a way to give the students an urgent reason to learn skills or knowledge and then let them show they have learned it by what they can do....

A great teacher will keep the students wanting to come to school just to see what interesting things they will explore and discover each day."

Exploration of the benefits of student-centred learning.

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Kidblog | Safe and simple blogs for your students.

Kidblog | Safe and simple blogs for your students. | Educational Insights | Scoop.it

Kidblog is designed for K-12 teachers who want to provide each student with an individual blog. Students publish posts and participate in academic discussions within a secure classroom blogging community. Teachers maintain complete control over student blogs and user accounts.


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Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 4, 2013 6:59 PM

The "Kid Blog' is a safe and effective way to allow your students to keep up to date blogs in a secure evironment. With these blogs students can not only post their own blogs, but oarticipate in discussions.

I feel this is a gerat resourse to use within the classroom, as students and teachers can keep track of students posts and especially look at their progress throughout the year.

Xyleme Alex's curator insight, August 7, 2013 4:58 PM

Looks like a great tool and it's entirely free. I like that it is based on the Wordpress platform, but removes the clutter and distractions that other blogging services have.

Antonio Tejero Aparicio's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:59 AM

Unaplicaciones recurso en línea muy útil para desarrollar la lectura y la escritura digital. Aquí tenéis un ejemplo

http://kidblog.org/6EnRed/


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29 Ways to Raise Creative Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

29 Ways to Raise Creative Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Educational Insights | Scoop.it

Fostering creative thinking inside our classrooms is one of the essential goals of our teaching. Ask any teacher today about what they want their students to develop and creativity will definitely be featured in their answers. Creativity is also a process that follows a thinking path, one that is inquisitive and noisy.  Saying that it is a process implies that it is learnable but it is not learned in the same rigorous way other thinking skills are learned.


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Desiree Desjardins's curator insight, August 3, 2013 9:31 AM

Love the graphic!

lbligen's curator insight, August 4, 2013 11:25 AM

Great rule of thumb.

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How Online Mapping Tools can Enhance Education - The Next Web

There are so many interesting map-based tools that can be used to help conceptualize, visualize, share, and communicate information.
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