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Sense and Sustainability in Education Reform | NEA Today

Sense and Sustainability in Education Reform | NEA Today | Education Reform | Scoop.it
It's a question that's daunted educators for decades: Why haven't well-intentioned efforts to improve teaching and learning in our schools had the kind of.
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The U.S. has made well-intentioned efforts throughout history and even in the present, but very few of these reforms have had a dynamic enough impact to result in lasting change. Clearly, in such as diverse and populous nation, small scale reform barely leaves a mark. So how dynamic and large-scale does U.S. education reform need to be? What does it even mean for reform to be large scale? Perhaps, small scale reform must be implemented at local levels all over the country or the method of small scale reform must be abandoned to adopt an effective and sustainable large scale version of reform.

           

Truly, such a broad question shakes my logic because I, on my own, cannot imagine how education reform for such a diverse population can be made effective and sustainable. At no point in our history or the history of any other country has governance of such a diverse population ever come into question. I am beginning to think that the U.S. is the pioneer of discovering the solution to education reform for such populously diverse people. I am seeing how some efforts are failing and that the U.S. looks to academically successful nations such as Finland for some guidance. However, I am excited to see how through many trials and errors, the U.S. will bring personal education to a broad mass of people. 

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Corporations and Education Reform: The Bad and the Ugly

Corporations and Education Reform: The Bad and the Ugly | Education Reform | Scoop.it
In January 2013, the Washington Post ran a story that discussed the links between former Florida governor Jeb Bush’s education reform foundation, Foundation for Educational Excellence, and another education reform group, Chiefs for Change.
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Education has long been a collaboration of private and public entities. However, this collaboration could easily become corrupt if either party of the collaboration becomes more dominating. The article focused specifically on the collaboration between business corporations and schools because these corporations were more concerned with company enhancement and revenue than how its agenda affected schools.

 

To be honest, I am frustrated to see the unnecessary complexity of issues in schools. Interestingly enough, too many external factors- whether they by private businesses or excessive government intervention- provide little help to schools. Sure they provide some monetary assistance and a least an outline of a comprehensive school system, but they cause more problems than they solve. Schools have become an abused partner in collaborations as corporations set their business agendas as priority. Dismissing potential collateral damage that may be suffered by schools as a result of putting the company’s interests first, corporations try to dominate and abuse schools.

 

 Initially, I thought that schools’ collaboration with eternal sources like corporations were an effective and unique technique that U.S. schools wisely implemented. However, I am starting to think that the intervention of too many external factors transform the education system into an easily moldable tool for anyone else’s agenda, not allowing the discovery of the true purpose and method of education for schools. 

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Education Reform Needs a Paradigm Shift - Muncie Voice

Education Reform Needs a Paradigm Shift - Muncie Voice | Education Reform | Scoop.it
Education Reform Needs a Paradigm Shift
Muncie Voice
Like the majority of our societal systems in the 21st century, the educational system is undergoing dramatic changes.
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Originally built upon the ideology of efficient industry, the American education system has, throughout history, evolved to systemize, organize, and categorize students into a homogenous assembly line, designed to produce human capital. However, with the soaring of immigration from diverse nations, America has become a gathering place for multiple cultures, religions, languages, and perspectives on academic standards. How could we possible take such diversity and cram it into a homogenous "assembly-line design" purposed for the Industrial Era. 

 

So then perhaps, we could possibly learn to group similar students,-in terms of culture, intelligence, or religion- and use one of these commonalities as a common core tool of unification to teach and meet other diverse qualities of the students. But, then wouldn't we be criticized for racial profiling, discriminating among different intelligences, or some other critique about using "unfair stereotypes'? 

 

We know the problem. But what is the solution without the collateral damage (i.e. profiling students)? How can we be fair and effective? 

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Bridging the False Dichotomy Between Poverty and Education Reform

Bridging the False Dichotomy Between Poverty and Education Reform | Education Reform | Scoop.it
Today’s blog post is by Communities In Schools President Dan Cardinali, who writes regularly for The Huffington Post. Recently I attended two days of meetings in Kalamazoo, Michigan that gave me a ...
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Education is a shared responsibility. It is should not be the internal efforts of the classroom alone that motivate change. Understanding that education reform is a community effort that far exceeds simply improving student academic performance, the community can work to allow true education reformation to take place.


So far, reading about government intervention in education policy, I began to see the U.S. education system as the property of politicians. Education reform seemed to be the “feel-good” factor that most politicians referred to in order to garner votes and generally, gain the public’s favor. Thus, I started to see education reform as a fictitious dream that people always talked about, but never executed.

 

However, through this article, which mentions how the Kalamazoo Promise works to bridge the gap between poverty and education, I realized that efforts are taking place to tackle the root of external factors that influence student academic performance. Such efforts are hopeful because I am realizing that different people and groups are understanding that education reformation isn’t just about improving standardized exam scores, but it’s about tackling the root of issues that affect academic performance (such as poverty).


However, I do have one question and challenge to the idea of community efforts to improve education that remains: with so many issues regarding education improvement, along with poverty, how will the U.S. as a nation, which is so diverse and distant, assemble as a community? Is it even practical or feasible with such a diverse and large nation? 

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Education Nation Summit Day Two

The fourth annual Education Nation Summit will explore "What It Takes" for us as a nation to ensure students are successfully prepared for college, career and beyond. Leading experts -- from...
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Why does academic success at the primary and secondary level have to lead to college acceptance? 

 

DISCLAIMER: This is not one of my official articles/videos/blogs. It is just an interesting video that I discovered to guide me on my track to filitering through sources to find the most valid and interesting ones. 

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State-driven Common Core is least we can do to accelerate student learning - Human Events

State-driven Common Core is least we can do to accelerate student learning - Human Events | Education Reform | Scoop.it
Human Events State-driven Common Core is least we can do to accelerate student learning Human Events We've had those for years, going back to Sputnik and then A Nation at Risk and now to continued poor performance on international tests – the most...
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Common Core Standards are hotly debated more in the interest of politics than national academic improvement and acheivement. Here in the U.S. we argue about the necessity of implementing the lowest common denominator, whereas, countries that out perform the U.S. academically (Finland and South Korea) almost implicitly accept the implications of a Common Core Standard and build upon it. 

 

In terms of education politics, the U.S. seems to be a hodgepoge of 50 different countries with their own ideas of education, all reluctant to be governed under one unifying goal. 

 

Seems to me that our problem is not with the "ineffectiveness" of educational policy reforms. Seems to me that we need to reform our method of education reform. We should no longer tweek the ends of already existing broken policies here and there. We need to reorganize, agree on one purpose, and start as one team with one goal. So perhaps we can create a federal system with the most basic requirments of what our students should be able to academically acheive, and then the 50 states can work within those guidelines and exceed. 

 

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