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8 TED Talks on the importance of play

8 TED Talks on the importance of play | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Play invites creativity and collaboration, and can inspire you to think out of the box! Take a recess and learn about the benefits of connecting with your inner-child.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 10, 2017 4:19 PM
A teacher I spoke to recently said play should be infused throughout K-12 school.
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8 digital skills we must teach our children

8 digital skills we must teach our children | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
The digital content they consume, who they meet online and how much time they spend onscreen – all these factors will greatly influence children’s development.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 3, 2017 7:07 PM
Digital use should be first on the list. How do we create that healthy integration between life and sitting in front of screens. Part of this is understanding how to use digital tools to find information in discerning ways.
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Why Historians Should Teach the Future

Why Historians Should Teach the Future | Education & Learning | Scoop.it

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European Borders Through History

European Borders Through History | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Students compare maps of European borders at three points in history: after World War I, after World War II, and the 2011 European Union (EU) countries. Students look for political borders that have changed and others that have remained the same, and compare those to what they know about cultural and physical geography in Europe and in their own state or local area.
 

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Creating Drop-Down Menus in Google Sheets

Creating Drop-Down Menus in Google Sheets | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Did you know you can create a drop down menu in Google Sheets? This is a handy feature if you are wanting students to choose from a list of questions to answer. The cell directly under your dropdown menu can be used for the students to type their answers. Click on the cell where the questions ... http://elearningfeeds.com/creating-drop-down-menus-in-google-sheets/
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Break your bad business habits in just 5 steps

We all have bad habits we’d like to break, especially when it comes to our work. Maybe you have a bad habit of not answering customer emails quickly enough. Or perhaps you work too hard and don’t get enough sleep or time off. Maybe you continuously over-promise and find yourself unable to del... http://elearningfeeds.com/break-your-bad-business-habits-in-just-5-steps/
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A Principal's Reflections: The Process of Change

A Principal's Reflections: The Process of Change | Education & Learning | Scoop.it

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How Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs influences Employee Engagement

How Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs influences Employee Engagement | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs model can be directly applied to current Employee Engagement theories all centered around the sense of self actualisation

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Anu Ojaranta's curator insight, August 3, 2016 2:23 PM
Very interesting use of Maslo's hierarchy! 
Shanel Jones's curator insight, August 6, 2016 9:14 PM

For teachers to be great for kids, we need to motivate them to high levels of engagement.

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Why Social and Emotional Skills Are Vital to Keep At-Risk Students on Track

Why Social and Emotional Skills Are Vital to Keep At-Risk Students on Track | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
There's more to learn at school than reading and math. Teaching kids to control their emotions, solve problems and work well with others can help them succeed
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Study: Weak Teachers benefited more from Good Lesson Plans than Professional Development

Study: Weak Teachers benefited more from Good Lesson Plans than Professional Development | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
A recent study found that giving middle school math teachers access to inquiry-based lesson plans and online support significantly improved student achievement—and benefited weaker teachers the most.
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Taking A New Pathway Through Your Teaching: The Wonder Of Mindset Mathematics

Taking A New Pathway Through Your Teaching: The Wonder Of Mindset Mathematics | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Renowned author and educator Jo Boaler provides resources on growth mindset in mathematics, including an online course that's open for registration.

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The first year of teaching can feel like a fraternity hazing 

The first year of teaching can feel like a fraternity hazing  | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
This is the first story in a three-part series about teacher preparation and whether programs are doing enough to prepare new teachers to take over their own classrooms. MIDDLE RIVER, Md. — On a chilly November morning, Michael Duklewski stood outside his seventh-grade classroom as students filed in, some shoving each other playfully, others still …

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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.


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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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5 Reasons To Utilize Social Media in Schools

5 Reasons To Utilize Social Media in Schools | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Over the past decade, social media has transformed communication. Pictures, videos, and comments can be easily posted and sent to followers instantly. For schools and educators, social media gives them another opportunity to share activities, programs, and student learning with the community. However, schools continue to lag behind the rest of industry in this area.…
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7 approaches to educational technology integration

7 approaches to educational technology integration | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Some approaches I use when talking digital strategy with educational institutions.

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Susanna Lavialle's curator insight, December 10, 2016 9:21 AM
Models to get you thinking, and so many ways in which technology can aid in learning.
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Why Historians Should Teach the Future

Why Historians Should Teach the Future | Education & Learning | Scoop.it

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There's No Such Thing as Critical Thinking Apart from Knowledge - Dave Stuart Jr.

Without knowledge, critical thinking — or critical reading, or critical writing, or critical speaking, or critical listening — probably isn’t all that critical or all that good. Consider: Without geographic knowledge — the regions of the world, the world’s major physical features and political borders — and chronological knowledge — basic periodization schemes and accompanying dates …

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 27, 2017 4:04 PM
John Dewey did not use the word knowledge. He used knowing,  a gerund suggesting a fluidity of what we think we know about the world. In hermeneutic phenomenology, Hans-Georg Gadamer used understanding as arising from mis-understanding which structured meaningful dialogue.
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Utilizing Psychology in Instructional Design

Utilizing Psychology in Instructional Design | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
In my previous post , I briefly introduced the different types of learning, both primary and secondary, and explained how each learning style can be incorporated into the field of Instructional Design. This week I am going a little further into detail as to the neural processes involved in each... http://elearningfeeds.com/utilizing-psychology-in-instructional-design/
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A Model for Teacher Development: Precursors to Change

A Model for Teacher Development: Precursors to Change | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Teachers need to receive training on models of change. Teachers should be trained in identifying their own professional development needs based on their classroom performance, areas that they aren’t performing up to par based on their own personal self-assessments as well as feedback from students, colleagues, and supervisors followed by intentional processes to help make positive changes in their work environments.

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António Leça Domingues's curator insight, August 13, 2016 4:06 AM
Um possível modelo de desenvolvimento pessoal dos docentes.
GwynethJones's curator insight, August 13, 2016 12:00 PM

Interesting!

Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, August 13, 2016 10:21 PM

Readiness to ICT driven learning tools and services is very important, I must add.

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MLA Style 8th Edition Works Cited Flipbook

MLA Style 8th Edition Works Cited Flipbook | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Do your students need to learn the latest MLA style (8th edition)? This handy foldable flip book (NO cutting involved) is an excellent tool for your students

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Tracee Orman's curator insight, August 4, 2016 10:06 PM
Handy resource for students (and teachers!) for the latest changes in MLA citations. 
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Top Ten Books for Principals to Read Aloud at Staff Meetings by Matt Renwick

Top Ten Books for Principals to Read Aloud at Staff Meetings by Matt Renwick | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
Files are saved, paperwork is completed, and instructions are left for the new principal.
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2nd best use of the first week of school: pre-assess against end of year goals

2nd best use of the first week of school: pre-assess against end of year goals | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
When I was a Varsity soccer coach, we spent a very busy week before school started doing twice-a-day pre-season workouts (as all sports now routinely do). The goals were simple: get people back in shape, and find out who could do what.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 9, 2017 6:13 PM
If teachers were with the same groups for 2-3 years, they could get to know who they are. I mean teachers knowing something about students and students knowing about teachers. Imagine a Phys Ed teacher teaching a group of students for 9 years. I taught one group, with some variations, for four.
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20 Questions That Schools Should Be Asking About Professional Development -

20 Questions That Schools Should Be Asking About Professional Development - | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
RT @mentoringminds: 20 Questions That Schools Should Be Asking About #ProfessionalDevelopment (#PD) https://t.co/CPBb0k8HHT #leadership htt…
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The Single Biggest Difference Between Leaders and Managers

The Single Biggest Difference Between Leaders and Managers | Education & Learning | Scoop.it
So what is the key mindset that distinguishes someone as a leader instead of a manager? It’s this:

Leaders proactively initiate change to improve the organization, whereas managers deal with change on a reactive basis.

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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.


Via Mel Riddile
more...
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen