Education in the world
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Education in the world
Education in different places of the world
Curated by Crissy Borton
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How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl"

How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl" | Education in the world | Scoop.it

She looks so much older then she really is. You can see her hard life on her face.


Via Seth Dixon
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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:28 AM

While the picture may be famous, she still represents depressing life that the women of her generation live.  I found it interesting that she had no idea that her photo was so iconic.  To have a photo taken of you that was used in for a variety of different things, all while not knowing about it is quite shocking.  As famous as the photo is however, it should not cloud the symbolism that the photo stands for. 

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:39 PM

I'm so glad that National Geographic found such an exotic specimen in the wild and that the US government graciously put its technology to use to catalog her..... seriously the Western fascination with the image of this Afghan woman, 1 of insanely many, is something I don't get. I think it makes us all feel "cultured" and "informed" when we can sit in the comfort of a dentist or doctor's waiting room and breeze through a Nat Geo cover to cover. A cheap thrill.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:38 AM

Her face was a publicity stunt. Her story is sad and is brutal. She was in a refugee camp but her story is only one of many. She didn't know she was the face of National Geographic and people have the image of her in their minds when they think of Aghani women.

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"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library

"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library | Education in the world | Scoop.it

What a great way to bring children of different groups together. This is a great way to bring about small change by showing people how they are a like and how they enjoy common things. Skating is not something you would think could change a culture but it is quite possible that Skateistan can do that. It shows you what one person and one simple idea can do.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:01 PM

In a society that is seen by most of the world as strict and rigid, it was interesting to see these children having fun and breaking the mold of traditional afghan kids. What makes this even more fascinating is that female children are doing some of the skating. With gender issues a hot topic in some Middle Eastern countries, letting kids have fun before being made to conform to tradition is a nice experience for them. While they still respect the culture to they belong to, it is a break from that and a breathe of fresh air for them. These youth are not seen primarily as men and woman, but as children.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:33 AM

Who could have imagined, that Skateboards could be used as a geopolitical tool? Over a decade ago, the United States invaded Afghanistan with the aim of rooting out and destroying the terrorist who attacked the nation on 911. As with most of our military campaigns in the Middle East, the mission quickly became bogged down in a nation building campaign. The people of Afghanistan have long been wary of foreign influence. Empire after empire has attempted to conquer this nation, only to suffer humiliating defeats. For any chance at sustained success, the United States must win over the hearts and minds of the Afghan people. This skateboard program is a perfect tool in accomplishing that objective. The parks bring all types of youths together in the spirit of fun. They are a unifying factor amongst the youth in Afghanistan.

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For Afghan Policewomen, Sex Abuse Is A Job Hazard

Until you change the attitude of the men having women police will have a small minimal effect. Most women have to lie about their jobs and are ashamed. They are still being abused treated like 2nd class citizens and stifled on. I think something like Skatestan will help create change and help women more then just putting them on the police force because it helps to change minds.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 2, 2015 9:49 PM

Women police officers and securities are pretty rare these days because women are unfortunately looked at as the weaker sex in comparison to men. According to my experiences in what young kids want to do for a living, many men who are police officers come from a high school jock background and overly-masculine persona. There barely have any sensitivity so they are more likely to become aggressive individuals.

Not too long ago, I watched the movie, human trafficking which involved sex slavery towards young girls and children being bought and sold by traffickers. The young female cop, played by Mira Sorvino,  went as an undercover sex trafficking victim which placed her in danger of being sex enslaved. Sometimes, when young, attractive police officers play a role in prostitution just to capture a suspect, they fail and end up being raped.