Education & Inequality
78 views | +0 today
Follow
Education & Inequality
Discussions on why education policies are failing to reverse inequality
Curated by Mashudu
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

UNICEF - Angola - UNICEF and EU-supported training for teachers boosts education quality in Angola

UNICEF - Angola - UNICEF and EU-supported training for teachers boosts education quality in Angola | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it

“Teacher training should be the first priority of education. A good teacher can achieve results, even under a tree,” said Mr. Jerónimo. “If you do not spend money on quality teaching, then the rest – the schools, the equipment – is for nothing. Who would think of entrusting a plane to an untrained pilot, or their life to a doctor who has not been to medical school?”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

THE LONG-TERM IMPACTS OF TEACHERS TEACHER VALUE-ADDED AND STUDENT OUTCOMES IN ADULTHOOD

THE LONG-TERM IMPACTS OF TEACHERS	  TEACHER VALUE-ADDED AND STUDENT OUTCOMES IN ADULTHOOD | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it

Students assigned to high value-added teachers are more likely to go to college, earn higher incomes, and less likely to be teenage mothers. On average, having such a teacher for one year raises a child's cumulative lifetime income by $50,000 (equivalent to $9,000 in present value at age 12 with a 5% interest rate).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

John Marsh’s Book, Class Dismissed, Is Good: Read It And Try Not To Kill Yourself

John Marsh’s Book, Class Dismissed, Is Good: Read It And Try Not To Kill Yourself | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it
When I started teaching writing to first generation collegians as a graduate student in New York, I too embraced the myth of education. I believed that I was helping young people gain the skills they needed to find success in their professional and personal lives.

Later, as I watched so many of my bright, capable low-income students struggle to earn degrees that seemed more likely to lead to a lifetime of debt than a good job, I began to doubt that mass education could be a tool of social mobility in an economy with stagnating wages and a growing, low-wage, service economy. This realization challenged everything I thought I knew about the trajectory of my own life as well as my belief in the basic fairness of the world. The more I studied the real relationship between education and upward mobility, the more troubled I became.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

I Cite My Sources in an Attempt to Deflate the Hot Air from the Teacher Quality Debate - Dana Goldstein

I Cite My Sources in an Attempt to Deflate the Hot Air from the Teacher Quality Debate - Dana Goldstein | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it
There is so much hot air in education reform, and it's extremely frustrating when one's arguments and supporting research are misconstrued.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mashudu from A South African Education
Scoop.it!

4 Characteristics of Education Programs That Actually Work

4 Characteristics of Education Programs That Actually Work | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it

Education is a huge conversation, but almost all of the conversation is about education problems. There is not a serious or mature conversation about solutions. Meanwhile, lots of resources and attention are going into an ever-changing, wide variety of programs it is hoped will be part of some solution.  How do we know when we’re looking at any given program, whether it can have game-changing impact on K-12 schools, or has no chance? I call the former, programs that “Actually Work.” Here I identify and describe four characteristics of any program that Actually Works: Scope,Results, Robustness, and Scalability. Failure at any one of these is failure to Work. 


Via Heiko Idensen, Mashudu
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

Past sins revisited and corrected

Past sins revisited and corrected | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it
In the second of his two-part article, Max price explains why UCT uses race in deciding who to admit.

The assumption underlying the demand in South Africa that a university's selection of applicants from privileged schools should be blind to race is that there is no longer any educational ­disadvantage for black students in such schools.

But the reality is different, as I pointed out last week in the first of this two-part article. The matric marks at the University of Cape Town's top 30 feeder schools nationally, almost all of which are private or former model-C, show that black students perform an average of seven percentage points lower than white students.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

School limits - Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

School limits - Le Monde diplomatique - English edition | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it
More and earlier teaching won't redress childhood disadvantages, and not everyone will be able to go to university, or get graduate level jobs afterwards.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

Teachers Matter, But So Do Words

Teachers Matter, But So Do Words | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it
The same research that shows teachers are the most important school-based factor affecting achievement also shows that non-school factors matter much more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mashudu
Scoop.it!

Can Teachers Alone Overcome Poverty? Steven Brill Thinks So | The Nation

Can Teachers Alone Overcome Poverty? Steven Brill Thinks So | The Nation | Education & Inequality | Scoop.it

Steven Brill blames teachers unions, not economic inequality, for students’ failure to achieve


In fact, the work of the many researchers Brill approvingly cites—including Kane, Staiger and Stanford’s Eric Hanushek—shows that while teaching is the most important in-school factor affecting student achievement, family and neighborhood characteristics matter more. The research consensus has been clear and unchanging for more than a decade: at most, teaching accounts for about 15 percent of student achievement outcomes, while socioeconomic factors account for about 60 percent.

more...
No comment yet.