Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Stop The Compliments and Show Me Some Gratitude

Stop The Compliments and Show Me Some Gratitude | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The deal closed after months and months of negotiations. Everyone was exhausted and beyond relieved. It would not only bring in a large amount of revenue in the business, but it would prevent any more layoffs. As everyone walked out of the room, he yelled out, “Great Job, job well done! Could not

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

It takes little time for teachers and students to figure out whether the praise is just empty words or has real meaning.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, May 6, 2014 11:52 AM

How we express appreciation is  as important as giving it.  Celebrating success with your staff takes on new meaning when it is personalized. 

Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Learning & Mind & Brain
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Experiments aren’t everything

In my own PhD research, I run randomised controlled trials (RCTs). These involve setting up two or more experimental conditions, varying only one factor between them and then randomly assigning subjects – in this case, students – to each of the conditions. RCTs are considered the gold standard for working out if one thing causes another because you manipulate just that one thing and nothing else. By randomly assigning students, we know that there are no other systematic differences between the members of the groups that could account for any difference in outcomes.

You may therefore expect me to be an evangelist for experiments. You might expect me to take a dim view of other ways of trying to establish cause and effect. But that’s not quite right.

I am also impressed by correlations and the evidence that correlations provide adds to the evidence we have in education. It is true that correlation does not equal causation, but this is the starting point for a discussion rather than the end point. I mentioned correlational evidence on Twitter recently and Dylan Wiliam responded with a link to this paper by Austin Bradford Hill, written in 1965 and addressing correlations in medicine; a field commonly known as ‘epidemiology’. It makes for an interesting read.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
In French, experiment and experience are the same word. I used hermeneutic phenomenology in my PhD research. The challenge is to triangulate. I used my teaching and lived-experiences as experiments.
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What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information.

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article is based on research about what happens chemically in one's brain when children become curious.
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Stop Telling your Kids that School Will Prepare them for Life

Stop Telling your Kids that School Will Prepare them for Life | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
My oldest son, Joseph, is very extroverted. Gabriel, his younger brother by two years, is the opposite. On any aptitude or intelligence test, I would bet that the older one scores higher. Joseph is…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
John Dewey stated "education is not preparation for life; education is life itself."

The article uses John Holt to make similar point.  An underlying message is introverts are often praised and extroverts managed.

Despite what the author says, schools feel much the same as they did when I went to school in the 1960's. Yes, there are new tools, strategies, and curricula, but they are superficial changes

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Helping Students Ask Better Questions by Creating a Culture of Inquiry

Helping Students Ask Better Questions by Creating a Culture of Inquiry | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Student inquiry is at the heart of student choice. When students are able to ask their own questions, they can chase their curiosity and tap into their own interests. They can build on their prior…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I use "mining for questions" a term I learned from William Isaacs. I ask students to ask questions, which generate more questions.

Mining for questions is like to eloquent questions in that both focus ongoing dialogue.
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Helping First Generation Students #WATWB

Helping First Generation Students #WATWB | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
If you follow me on Twitter, or if you follow this blog, you probably realize or would quickly remember that I attended undergraduate school at West Virginia University (WVU – Go Mountaineers). You may even remember that I started undergraduate school at the University of Georgia (Go Dawgs). If you read a few older posts,…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an excellent article about the challenges and opporunities that first generation post-secondary students face
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Education
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It's better to understand something than to know it

It's better to understand something than to know it | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Without knowledge, understanding is impossible. But having knowledge doesn’t necessarily lead to understanding of a greater narrative, which is the real point of gathering information.

Via Nik Peachey, juandoming, Mary Martínez
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Understanding something is about gathering more information. Eloquent questions help understanding as we engage in dialogue, listening to others and letting text speak to us. We are curious.

John Dewey used the gerund of knowledge and growth, knowing and growing to propose that knowledge is fluid.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 15, 4:12 AM

Well worth reading and considering.

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Emergence and Growth of Knowledge and Diversity in Hierarchically Complex Living Systems

Emergence and Growth of Knowledge and Diversity in Hierarchically Complex Living Systems | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
An environment conducting a flux of energy and materials between temporally or spatially separated sources and sinks may become more complexly structured due to the emergence of cyclical, dissipative transport systems. Selection favors transport systems able to stabilize themselves against environmental perturbations through feedback. Continuing selection for self-stabilization over long periods of time may eventuate…

Via june holley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a link at the bottom to a working paper (PDF format) that expands on the subject. It draws on Karl Popper and Maturano and Varela.
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You’re a Researcher Without a Library: What Do You Do?

You’re a Researcher Without a Library: What Do You Do? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The world of publishing is evolving frantically, while it remains frustratingly fragmented and prohibitively expensive for many. If you’re a student who just left your academic library behind only to…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This was a challenge for me in multiple ways. Libraries provide access to resources, people, and a space to read and write. The Internet helps resolve some issues related to access to resources and people. I found a nice little coffee shop to read and write.
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Why philosophy is so important in science education – Subrena E Smith | Aeon Ideas

Why philosophy is so important in science education – Subrena E Smith | Aeon Ideas | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Each semester, I teach courses on the philosophy of science to undergraduates at the University of New Hampshire. Most of the students take my courses to satisfy general education requirements, and most of them have never taken a philosophy clas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Philosophy is about a love of wisdom. It helps us be skeptical of our own personal beliefs, words, and actions. It grounds our questions and hypotheses as we move forward. Reading Thomas Kuhn, a philosopher of science, gives us insight into how paradigms shift.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Education Today and Tomorrow
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Assigning More Writing—With Less Grading

Assigning More Writing—With Less Grading | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Check out four best practices for teaching writing that can help you improve student learning without creating a mountain of grading work."


Via WEAC
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Treat writing like an ongoing process, rather than having a fixed begining and end. I had students who continued writing one year to the next.
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100+ Exclusive Dr Seuss Quotes That Still Resonate Today - BayArt

100+ Exclusive Dr Seuss Quotes That Still Resonate Today - BayArt | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
HEY! Here best quotes from Dr Seuss masterpieces to motivate you, make you think and give you a bit of smile. Which Should Be Your New Favorite Quotes?

Via Deniz Yalım (BayArt)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Dr. Seuss is one of my favourites
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from the plastic brain
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Music only helps you concentrate if you’re doing the right kind of task

Music only helps you concentrate if you’re doing the right kind of task | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How sound affects performance has been the topic of laboratory research for over 40 years, and is observed through a phenomenon called the irrelevant sound effect.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Music can both distract and become irrelevant background noise.
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Research every teacher should know: setting expectations

Research every teacher should know: setting expectations | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In his series of articles on how psychology research can inform teaching, Bradley Busch picks an academic study and makes sense of it for the classroom. This time: a research project on expectations
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Set high and reasonable expectations with each student. Let them stretch and make mistakes from which they can learn and grow.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Purposeful Pedagogy
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5 questions to ask before assigning homework via Matt Miller

5 questions to ask before assigning homework via Matt Miller | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Teachers have widely varying opinions on homework. Before assigning it, think through these five questions first.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Is the homework meaningful and can students do it at home? Can students assume responsiblity for their learning? Those are essential questions for me.

Understanding what research tells us about homework is important.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Educational Discourse
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Over 50 Learning Theories Explained for Teachers via @medkh9

Over 50 Learning Theories Explained for Teachers via @medkh9 | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Stephanie Sandifer, Kelly Christopherson
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
You have to go to the Learning Theories link to a second page where the theories' links are live.
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The “Third World” Is Not Your Classroom – BRIGHT Magazine

The “Third World” Is Not Your Classroom – BRIGHT Magazine | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Nodidi Mgudlwa, an 11-year-old with coltish legs to match, walked around the red dirt roads of Langa with a white American girl trailing behind her. She had learned that when the stares got to be too…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"There are real, tangible benefits to having experiences abroad. And yet, too often we celebrate the revelation without considering the labor that makes it possible. Who does the work of teaching privileged people who choose to study, work, and live in comparatively less resourced countries? What are the economic and emotional benefits and costs of that teaching?"

The quote is powerful. Teaching and learning are relational. In the article, Jean Piaget is referred to. about leaps in learning occur when we encounter information that challenges our worldview or paradigm.
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Leaders: Have a Sense of History

Leaders: Have a Sense of History | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Leaders are missing a sense of history. A sense of history is important in business, education, nonprofits, and government.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Understood through a historical lens, personal and collective, public school can be seen as re-experiencing our own schooling. History provides lessons. It does not provide certainty, but a window into how we move into the future. Pedagogy and educate mean to lead.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Assessing Art Education in Public Schools
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Do No Harm: Flexible and Smart Grading Practices

Do No Harm: Flexible and Smart Grading Practices | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Have students take responsibility for their grades and behavior by strategically offering opportunities to redo assignments, retake tests, and reflect on their performance.

Via Les Howard, Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Learning and growing are ongoing. Taking that stance means teachers would offer students opportunities to redo activities, retake tests, and reflecting on their learning (metacognition).
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Lyseo.org (ICT in High School)
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What qualities will future teachers need? #AndyHargreaves

What qualities will future teachers need? #AndyHargreaves | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As facts become more easily accessible, the role of the teacher is changing. Teachers of the future will need both more authority… and less authority, argues

Via Grant Montgomery, Mika Auramo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a paradox here about authority. Teachers will need to have less authority and, at the same time, more. Parker Palmer speaks about authoring our authority and part of that is accepting we do not know it all.
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Why it's up to you to create a civil workplace

Why it's up to you to create a civil workplace | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Did you know that nearly half of the people in your organization are afraid to be civil to one another? According to Georgetown University researcher Christine Porath, more than 40% of employees say they hesitate to show civility at work because they fear people will take advantage of them.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is a sad comment that we are afraid to be civil in our workplace. Schools are places where bullying amongst adults is rampant. Some of it is because of the isolation and we do not know how to step outside the bubble of our classrooms. Teacher civility is essential in the role modeling for students. It is part of our leading them.

In an Aristotlean understandng, rhetoric is more than we say. It is how we comport ourselves in each given moment.
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Examining the Unexamined: Why Do Students Procrastinate?

Examining the Unexamined: Why Do Students Procrastinate? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Here are the assignment features and details researchers thought might be related to procrastination (based in part on some previously published conceptual work): fear (worry that the student wasn’t going to do well on the assignment); norms (work on the assignment was started early/late by everyone else in the class); deadline pressure (lots of assignments due before this one); rewards (incentives for getting started early); interdependence (other work in the course couldn’t be done until the assignment or parts of it were finished); interest (assignment was something the student wanted to do); skill variety (assignment required a variety of skills); scope of the task (assignment was time consuming); difficulty (it was a hard assignment); clarity (did not understand assignment requirements); propensity to procrastinate (usually waiting until the last minute before starting assignments).

And did any of these discourage procrastination? Yes, not surprising, students procrastinated less when they thought the assignment was interesting. Think authentic assignments—ones that give students a chance to do work like that done in the discipline. Assignments that involved using a variety of skills also made students procrastinate less as did clearly understanding the assignment requirements. Incentives get students to start working as does having assignments connected to each other, or broken into units, so that the second part cannot be completed until the first part is done. And norms are influential. If everyone else is at work on the assignment, that engenders enough guilt to get others started.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Go to article for numerous embedded links.


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
An interesting article based on research which approaches procrastination from a different perspective.
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Has Education for Democracy Failed? 

Has Education for Democracy Failed?  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Most civics education today at best educates young people to be voters, not to participate in a democracy. Considering today’s enormous disruptions and challenges, educating children to be ‘g…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Jacques Ranciere claims politics is occasional, democracy ongoing. I struggled with that until recently. In authoritarian states politics is in your face 24/7. The faces of the autocrats are plastered all over public spaces.

Democracy is about the rule of the people. It is about dialogue and inviting each person present to voice their view. It is how we treat one another in our daily conversations. To educate is to lead. To be a pedagogue is also to lead. The role of teachers is to lead in democractic ways.
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No more zeros in K-12 education

No more zeros in K-12 education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately."


Via WEAC
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Rubrics are a prelude to grading. I used rubrics extensively as feedback. I gave them to students as we began an activity. We discussed what they meant. It was feedback for me from beginning to end. Too often, we conflate rubrics with marks.
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6 Strategies For Dealing With ‘Difficult’ Students by Dr. Allen Mendler

6 Strategies For Dealing With ‘Difficult’ Students by Dr. Allen Mendler | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
From building relationships to cultivating responsibility and even ‘fun’ over time, here are 6 strategies for dealing with your most ‘difficult’ students.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Form relationships with students, give them responsibility over their learning (it is their learning), teach in a compelling way, create a safe space for learning and teaching, and make it fun.
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Why I’m not involved: Parental involvement from a parent’s perspective

Why I’m not involved: Parental involvement from a parent’s perspective | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A university researcher explains how issues of race, culture, and trust have made her reluctant to become more involved at her son’s school.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article is written by Jung-ah Choi who is an immigrant from South Korea, a parent, and an education professor.

When I first began teaching, I quickly understood how important is was to know the students and to let them know me, within reason. When I began teaching in Stony Creek, the same applied to parents. They wanted me to know them, their families, and wanted to know me.

When parent feel welcome and included in the conversations about their children, it has the potential to be a two-way conversation, not a lecture. As teachers, maybe we can open the door by asking parents to tell us about their children.
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