Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Infographic: Top Ten Reasons for Choosing a Paper Book over an eBook

Infographic: Top Ten Reasons for Choosing a Paper Book over an eBook | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Marianela Camacho Alfaro, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

There is definitely a difference. It is similar, but not the same, as handwriting and keyboarding in some ways. It activates us differently.

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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from

Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A unique combination of data sets for the first time lets us see more about who is — and, crucially, is not — able to successfully pursue a career as an inventor, and thus learn more about what’s arguably the biggest mystery in all of economics.

Via Nik Peachey, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Who are we leaving behind? Who is the next Einstein that is overlooked due to class, gender, race, etc?
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, December 6, 6:48 AM

Some interesting research insights.

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Example is such a simple lesson plan

Example is such a simple lesson plan | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings December 8, 2017 Example is such a simple lesson plan   “We taught our children by both example and instruction, but with an emphasis on example, because all learning is a dead language to one who gets it second hand.” Kent Nerburn, The Wisdom of the Native Americans   I have over the…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Knowledge was inherent in all things. The world was a library.” Luther Standing Bear

There is no barrier between the world and us execpt for artificial ones created through language. How we livue in the world is a powerful message to our children and students.  It is good to re-member that educate and pedagogy have to do with leading children.
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Educational Leadership:Mental Health in Schools:Responding with Care to Students Facing Trauma

Educational Leadership:Mental Health in Schools:Responding with Care to Students Facing Trauma | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
An essential part is to understand children as humans with real issues. We do not always have opportunities to pull back the curtain for a view into the lives of our students. Sometimes we think it is obvious, because we teach students who live in care. We need to listen and learn about our students each day.

What does it mean to care for our students in unconditional and non-jugemental ways? This makes welcoming and saying good-bye students essential each day.


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How a physicist is healing from trauma caused by math teaching

How a physicist is healing from trauma caused by math teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I remember a couple experiences that shaped my interaction with physics/math that I would like to let go of now. The first involved an undergraduate course on electricity and magnetism with Prof…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The essential aspect of good teaching is it acknowledges that different learners learn in different ways. I just finished bell hooks's Teaching to Transgress, which draws on a similar theme.

Differences make a difference.
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The Three-Step System For Getting Students to Do the Talking

The Three-Step System For Getting Students to Do the Talking | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I had always believed my classroom was about the students, they were the reason we taught and my focus was always on their learning. This new terminology sounded like another buzzword and I didn’t…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This article is based on Seth Godin's work in part. Godin has interesting ideas, but is not a teacher. He is about self-promoting.

The bottom line question is do we want students to participate in class? The answer is yes, but in a qualified way. Not every student is going to just speak up. Some are reserved for various reasons. Others talk just for the sake of hearing themselves (self-promoting?)

The idea of games to create comfort is good. What I do is create activities that draws students into their learning. I focus on the subject and where students are in their learning. The more concrete (John Dewey) the better.
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The 20% Rule: Applying the Secret of Benjamin Franklin and Isaac Newton

The 20% Rule: Applying the Secret of Benjamin Franklin and Isaac Newton | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
He was getting into a bath when he noticed that the water level rose as he entered the tub. His sudden insight being that the volume of water displaced must be equal to the volume of the part of his…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The idea is to provide time to just let things happen. Many new ideas are arrived at by accident and in unexpected ways i.e. penicillin.

This means letting time for students to just be and allow for a certain amount of randomness and chaos. We had cards, board games, time for conversation, and time outside almost everyday.
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Looking beyond the sandstone: universities reinvent campuses to bring together town and gown

Looking beyond the sandstone: universities reinvent campuses to bring together town and gown | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
European ideas of the campus as a place apart shaped Australia's "sandstone" universities. Now universities are adopting urban regeneration strategies, bringing the city to the campus and vice versa.

Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Arizona State has developed an approach that calls for it and how they teach to reflect the local community. For example, they have worked at having a proportionate reflection of students of colour, students living in poverty, and other demographic considerations in their enrolment numbers.

This idea is a gradual (slow) move towards reflecting the roles of post-secondary schools in a society.
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Education Readings December 8th

Education Readings December 8th | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach As the New Zealand school year is coming to an end, Bruce Hammonds and I are taking a break from producing these education readings. We hope you all have a great festive season and we’ll be back at the end of January. I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are some interesting links to articles about learning in nature, the pervasive neo-liberal agenda that carries over from the 20th Century (the 19th for that matter), educational sects, etc.
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What do we really know?

What do we really know? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings December 5, 2017 What do we really know?   “Teachers are one of the most important resources a nation has for providing the skills, values and knowledge that prepare young people for productive citizenship – but more than this, to give sanctuary to their dreams and aspirations for a future of hope, dignity…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"I believe that much of present education fails because it neglects this fundamental principle of the school as a form of community life. It conceives the school as a place where certain information is to be given, where certain lessons are to be learned, or where certain habits are to be formed. The value of these is conceived as lying largely in the remote future; the child must do these things for the sake of something else he is to do; they are mere preparation. As a result they do not become a part of the life experience of the child and so are not truly educative.” John Dewey

Schooling and education are two different processes. School is a narrow function that purportedly prepares students for a future we do not know about fully. It cannot and does not.

The post underscores a need to change what schools are and how we understand educate as a broader and holistic forming of each human as reflect on how their self-interests inform being educated. It is about transforming schools and our understanding of what that means.
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Using controversy as a teaching tool: An interview with Diana Hess 

Using controversy as a teaching tool: An interview with Diana Hess  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to engage in civil discussions about important issues is even more essential in an environment as polarized and politicized as America is today. 

 By Joan Richardson 

Kappan: You started your career as a high school social studies teacher in Downers Grove, Ill., which is in
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There has not been a time when controversy has not been essential to teaching. It is cross-curricular in many ways i.e. evolution in Science, politics and social justice in Social Studies, and the writing of people such as Langston Hughes in English.

Today, it involves the deluge of information and trying to understand what is fact-based rather than ideology. Teachers and students become critical theorists in this learning.
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Picture Book Biographies for Middle Grades? Absolutely!

Picture Book Biographies for Middle Grades? Absolutely! | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
To introduce tweens and teens to a new science concept, a historical era, or a math idea, use a picture book biography, says media specialist Christina Dorr.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I used them as a cross grade activity where older students in middle school mentored younger students in reading, writing, and using software for picture books.
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What Do We Really Mean When We Say ‘Personalized Learning’?

What Do We Really Mean When We Say ‘Personalized Learning’? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Personalization is often used in the ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace. The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises. For many educators that’s not the true meaning of “personalized learning.”

Via Nik Peachey, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Personalization is often used in the ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace."

How is that different than the traditional process of prescribed set of activities. The only difference is pacing, maybe? What is different is it is an facile and trite new expression that is easy to throw out there and impress people. It is part of a nonsensical neo-liberal agenda.

I subscribe to John Dewey, William Doll, and Ted Aoki and letting students have a voice in their learning in ways that allow them freedom to make choices and still follow the curriculum-as-plan.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, December 4, 1:36 AM

Worth a read.

Jerry Busone's curator insight, December 5, 7:39 AM

Personalized learning is not learn at your pace and check the box when you are done. Thats control and compliance to learn something. Personalized learning misgiving the learner the  freedom to follow a meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, challenge and analyze information and make their assumptions on best way to leverage those skills.

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How to Ask Your Boss for Time to Learn New Things

How to Ask Your Boss for Time to Learn New Things | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

We all want to learn and grow. Improving our skills and being exposed to new ideas not only makes us better at our jobs but makes us happier and more engaged at work. But with a full-time job, it can be tough to find the time and resources to dedicate to personal development. Some people, like me, are lucky to work for companies that encourage and even fund classes, sabbaticals, or fellowships. But if you work for a company that doesn’t have an official policy, how can you make the case to your manager (and the necessary higher ups) to support you?'

 

Identify how you want to learn and grow. If you don’t yet have a clear picture of what you want to develop, spend time honing in on exactly what you need. Do you want to build your emotional intelligence skills to be a more attuned business leader? Are you interested in going on a yoga or meditation retreat? Set aside a specific period of time, such as one evening or even a week, to explore ideas and research what appeals to you. Write down what you want to learn and how you would grow from the experience you’ve identified. Research shows that the physical act of writing has a neurological effect on the brain which tells the cerebral cortex to “wake up and pay attention.” Writing stimulates a bunch of cells in the brain called the Reticular Activating System that plays a key role in being more conscious and alert. The more you can write down, the more aware and real your ideas become. 


Via The Learning Factor, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The irony for teachers is that you have to fight to get professional learning that is essential to your teaching. What we call life-long learning is a neo-liberal sham that bureaucrats and middle managers parrot.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 30, 4:52 PM

A six-step plan for making a persuasive request.

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Personalized Learning Should Start in Libraries

Personalized Learning Should Start in Libraries | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Can a library be the perfect place for personalized learning? We believe the answer is yes. Libraries offer endless resources, space for learning, and individuals who are ready to assist students in the learning and research process. Sometimes when professors’ office hours do not line up with students’ schedules, we often forget, that librarians are here to help us too! That’s why we have libraries and librarians! Even if we think it is intimidating to approach a librarian, it should not be, because they are the experts in libraries! Not only are librarians available to assist us, but they are also available to teach us how to use the resources that the library has to offer.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I agree. What is needed are librarians in schools. In the schools I taught at, there was a concerted effort to eliminate libraries and librarians. That has to end.
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, November 25, 10:03 AM
Share your insight
David Stapleton's curator insight, November 26, 2:46 PM
Education is yours and your brain needs it
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An education for all not the few - facing up to inequality / what is personalised learning?/ an end of term survey /education for the future

An education for all not the few - facing up to inequality / what is personalised learning?/  an end of term survey /education for the future | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Education Readings By Allan Alach As the New Zealand school year is coming to an end, Bruce and I are taking a break fro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Recent studies have shown there are relatively few differences between the way that boys and girls learn. As a matter of fact, there are more differences within each gender than there are between the genders, especially for academic ability."

This is a quote from the article about gender discrimination and how to identify it.
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Truth Matters – Words That Matter – Medium

Truth Matters – Words That Matter – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
There is this thing people do in online discourse, where the truth becomes elastic, pliable. One person makes a statement and someone who disagrees reframes it, provocatively, to suit their purpose…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Words matter. The truth matters. It is incomprehensible that this needs to be said, but this needs to be said."

Language is more than words. We do not live in a post-truth world. We live in a world where un-truths seem to be accepted much like fish accept water as their habitat.

Teachers play a role in helping students learn how to discern what is true and what is just the noise of bloviating reality shows being performed each day.
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Staying true to your core during hard times

Staying true to your core during hard times | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Lead Change is a leadership media destination with a unique editorial focus on driving change within organizations, teams, and individuals. Lead Change, a division of Weaving Influence, publishes twice monthly with SmartBrief. Today's post is by Art Barter.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
At the heart of what we do and say seach day, are our core values. How we understand them might change, but they remain stable and offer us stablity.

"Our own message has to be our life" Thich Nhat Hanh
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Embrace Discomfort. Your Long-Term Personal Growth Depends on it

Embrace Discomfort. Your Long-Term Personal Growth Depends on it | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Regardless of what you know or read, everybody wants growth — the ability to consistently improve to be better and smarter. The comfort zone, as defined by Lifehacker, is a “behavioral space where…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This has a caveat. The younger the person and less experienced the person is the more support they need. Parents and teachers can lead each child in particular ways.

Jean Piaget argued that learning is about continuous equlibrium and disequiibrium. We need time to regain our footing before we are ready for a new experience of discomfort. It gives us time to practice.
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Five Things You Can Do Everyday to Upgrade Your Intellect

Five Things You Can Do Everyday to Upgrade Your Intellect | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Originally appeared on Quora by Dylan Woon. “Five Things You Can Do Everyday to Upgrade Your Intellect” is published by The Mission in The Mission
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
View life as a series of projects, construct a mental library to expand how you view the world, be self-skeptical, experiment (in French experience is the same word), and spend time with people who challenge how you think and can add to how you think.
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Inverse Relationship Between GPA and Innovative Orientation

Inverse Relationship Between GPA and Innovative Orientation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Students today are stressed out about grades, more so than ever before. A few months ago I published a post (here) with evidence that this is so for college students. Many students responded to that…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Marks are quite often a sign of how compliant and conforming a student was/is. It may depend on how marks are arrived at. For example, do well-used rubrics and portfolios shed a different light on these findings?
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Autonomy and Motivation -Education & Teacher Conferences

Autonomy and Motivation -Education & Teacher Conferences | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Self-determination theory, developed by Edward Deci & Richard Ryan, argues that people are motivated by a desire for three things: autonomy, relatedness, and competence.

This theory suggests that teachers can motivate students by creating lesson plans and classroom environments that promote all three.

As is always true, such broad categories identified by researchers might not be easy to translate into specific classroom practices that work for my students.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Rather than giving answers, the author provides questions and uncertainty. What motivates one person is different than what motivates the next. The key is to understand we want freedom, relatedness, and to be competent in ways essential to each of us. Also, there will be constraints to achieving what we want.
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Politicizing pedagogy: Teaching for liberty and justice at urban schools

Politicizing pedagogy: Teaching for liberty and justice at urban schools | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Learning about and debating controversial topics is insufficient. Students must grapple with issues that truly matter to their local communities.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Democracy necessitates civil deliberation of thorny political issues. If schools, out of fear, neglect to develop this capacity, students will graduate unprepared to navigate political controversies and potentially reluctant to influence the political contexts that shape their lives."

Teachers in many ways are critical theorists. We may not record the outcomes per se, but we find ways to poke and perturb the tribal ways of thinking that prevail. That includes our own.

The method of currere and hermeneutic phenomenology both acknowledge we bring our own lived-experiences and prejudices to any dialogic forum. Eloquent questions open up the dialogic space and keep it open, bringing new questions forward and challenging the unacknowledged ways we grow to understand the world and people. Curriculum is a contested and not a settled space.
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What a Horse With Heartburn Taught Me About Developing Student Passion and Autonomy - EdSurge News

What a Horse With Heartburn Taught Me About Developing Student Passion and Autonomy - EdSurge News | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Most educators would agree that for learning to be meaningful, students need to find personal connections that help them make the content they’r
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Students, not teachers, are responsible for their learning. Teachers are responsible to what that might mean with each student and the context within which they teach. The current structure is aligning teaching into an instrumental process based on pre-determined outcomes, which is impossible. This means teacher and student automony exist and have to exist. Teaching is then understood as relational.
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From Patriarchy To Partnership – The Paradigm Shift Our Organisations Need | Corporate Rebels

From Patriarchy To Partnership – The Paradigm Shift Our Organisations Need | Corporate Rebels | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
We are in a paradigm and most of us are blind to it. You could call it Theory X or top-down, but one way to summarise it is that we are in a parent-child paradigm. There have been shades of this throughout history but perhaps none more dominant than the Industrial Era which was fuelled by the worldview that employees, then largely uneducated, are naturally stupid and lazy and must be monitored, controlled and motivated.

Incredibly, this is still the prevailing paradigm in workplaces today. We might have upgraded it a little, but not much. (Just read this mind blowing article by Aeon about the ‘stupidity paradox’ in organisations.) But what about companies that invest heavily in employee engagement programmes and making their people happy? Often this is just a different shade of being a parent – either a caring parent, or a coercive parent! The underlying belief is still: “people need to be motivated and taken care of to be productive.”

“We already know how to be good parents at work. The alternative, partnership, is something we are just learning about. Our difficulty with creating partnership is that parenting – and its stronger cousin, patriarchy – is so deeply ingrained in our muscle memory and armature that we don’t even realise we are doing it.”

– Peter Block, Stewardship

Via David Hain, Ian Berry
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I agree, but having worked in private industry and in public schools I am not hopeful. What we need is to be attentive to the pretexts and subtexts of our organizations that lead to oppressive structures, so we can shift paradigms and liberate adults by treating them as responible, autonomous beings.

Is our objective to create algorithms so we can simply replace people who stand up? Being a rebel is fun. It upsets the ones who simply want conformity and compliance.

Being adult-adult doesn’t mean we get to do what we want or that there is a leadership vacuum. It means we are truly in a partnership, [responsible for our actions and] to each other.
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David Hain's curator insight, December 3, 7:05 AM

Paternalism is the enemy of genuinely distributed leadership. Bosses need to stop behaving like parents!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 3, 12:19 PM

Your thoughts?

Ian Berry's curator insight, December 4, 4:28 PM
Agree with the premise. Good diagram and references. The first step I think is letting go of the need to be in control
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Teachers often ask youngsters to learn in ways that exceed even adult-sized attention spans - The Hechinger Report

Teachers often ask youngsters to learn in ways that exceed even adult-sized attention spans - The Hechinger Report | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Distracted students are the bane of teachers. In surveys, teachers complain about students walking around the classroom, talking with peers, staring at the walls and fidgeting with their clothes — anything but paying attention to the lesson or the task at hand. Teachers are crying out for help to keep kids on task, but student …
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I instruct hockey coaches in coaches clinics. I suggest several things to help them deal with this issue. First, with young children have a number of adults helping you. Second,  with young children keep instructions short and use demonstrations. A picture is worth a thousands words. Third, create lots of variety in one practice and repeat over several practices. They are young so 5-7 minutes can be a long time. Last, keep them active in tasks you want them to complete.

Hockey coaches get it, but teachers and administrators don't.
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