Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think: A new proposal for reforming teacher education

Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think: A new proposal for reforming teacher education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A new proposal for reforming teacher education
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
For my research, I interviewed far fewer than 500 teachers and they agreed that university preparation was inadequate. I disagree that it is too theoretical. I think it is too technical. Also it relies on people who have not been in a K-12 classroom for a long time, spent little time in a K-12 classroom, and in some cases did not want to be in a K-12 classroom.

When I was doing my undergrad, I connected the theory to practical questions i.e. why do students drop out of school and players quit hockey. It helped bridge the gap between theory (theoria has to do with celebrating) and practice (praxis). Perhaps the theory and science can come to life for education students and teachers.

What Daniel Willingham ends up talking about is transforming schools and teaching practices, not reforming. Reforming is just rearranging deck chairs on a sinking ship and we have done far too much of that.
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Why philosophy is so important in science education – Subrena E Smith | Aeon Ideas

Why philosophy is so important in science education – Subrena E Smith | Aeon Ideas | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Each semester, I teach courses on the philosophy of science to undergraduates at the University of New Hampshire. Most of the students take my courses to satisfy general education requirements, and most of them have never taken a philosophy clas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Philosophy is about a love of wisdom. It helps us be skeptical of our own personal beliefs, words, and actions. It grounds our questions and hypotheses as we move forward. Reading Thomas Kuhn, a philosopher of science, gives us insight into how paradigms shift.
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Failure to Think Critically Allows Anti-Science to Flourish

Failure to Think Critically Allows Anti-Science to Flourish | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Lack of critical thinking skills has allowed anti-science policies of Trump's administration and Congress to threaten the health and well-being of the country.

Via Demarcio Washington, Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Questioning is at the heart of science. It begins with a hypothesis that should challenge one's own thinking and conventional thinking of a group.
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Higher Perspective: 10 Easy Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science

Higher Perspective: 10 Easy Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Most of this has been established through scientific research.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:43 PM
Happiness is so interesting, because we all have different ideas about what it is and how to get it. So naturally we are obsessed with it.
I would love to be happier, as I’m sure most people would, so I thought it would be interesting to find some ways to become a happier person that are actually backed up by science. Here are ten of the best ones I found.
1. Exercise more – 7 minutes might be enough
You might have seen some talk recently about the scientific 7 minute workout mentioned in The New York Times. So if you thought exercise was something you didn’t have time for, maybe you can fit it in after all.
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Using controversy as a teaching tool: An interview with Diana Hess 

Using controversy as a teaching tool: An interview with Diana Hess  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to engage in civil discussions about important issues is even more essential in an environment as polarized and politicized as America is today. 

 By Joan Richardson 

Kappan: You started your career as a high school social studies teacher in Downers Grove, Ill., which is in
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There has not been a time when controversy has not been essential to teaching. It is cross-curricular in many ways i.e. evolution in Science, politics and social justice in Social Studies, and the writing of people such as Langston Hughes in English.

Today, it involves the deluge of information and trying to understand what is fact-based rather than ideology. Teachers and students become critical theorists in this learning.
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Why Preschool Science Education Is So Important

Why Preschool Science Education Is So Important | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Undoubtedly, scientific literacy has become a key competency to acquire in school. The skills it teaches are vital for anyone entering the workforce of the future. But for children to develop the skills, they need a proper foundation, usually laid in elementary school—and even earlier.

Via THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Children are innately curious. The essential part of teaching them is to ask questions that further that curiosity.
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Art and Math and Science, Oh My! – sailor mercury – Medium

Art and Math and Science, Oh My! – sailor mercury – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I was always made to feel that these two interests were unrelated. I had art class at school. I had science class at school. Sometimes I did watercolors on the weekend. Sometimes I taught myself…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Art, Math, and Science overlap. Sailor Mercury makes the point that we want students to specialize and Science, Technology, and Art make the world a better place when combined. John Dewey wrote about self-interest as being the same as who each of us is as a person.
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Chris's curator insight, May 23, 2017 4:07 AM
We often draw a line that separates people interested in art and people interested in science, and assume that they aren't interested in - nor likely very good at - the other. But some people do like to walk the line, and there's some great applications for it!