Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
3.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How Creative Teaching Improves Students’ Executive Function Skills | #Creativity

How Creative Teaching Improves Students’ Executive Function Skills | #Creativity | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Synopsis
Teaching creatively, no matter the age group, grade level, or subject matter, not only improves the students’ creativity skills but also enhances their executive function networks.

… To be ready for college, the workforce, and a life in a technological society, students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize, and analyze an overwhelming volume of information … Executive Functions plus a strong base of core knowledge are the essential skills for success in today’s world. For students to think critically, collaboratively, and communicate effectively, these must be strengthened.

 

To adequately prepare for success in careers or higher education, students need guided opportunities to construct strong networks of executive functions. Without this preparation to develop executive functions during the school years, students can fall short. They may lack requirements for higher education and the competitive job market including the skill sets needed for cognitive flexibility, successful communication, collaboration, or creative innovation.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Creative-Thinking

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a research-based article that underscores the merits of teaching creatively.
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, January 11, 3:46 PM
Synopsis
Teaching creatively, no matter the age group, grade level, or subject matter, not only improves the students’ creativity skills but also enhances their executive function networks.

… To be ready for college, the workforce, and a life in a technological society, students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize, and analyze an overwhelming volume of information … Executive Functions plus a strong base of core knowledge are the essential skills for success in today’s world. For students to think critically, collaboratively, and communicate effectively, these must be strengthened.

 

To adequately prepare for success in careers or higher education, students need guided opportunities to construct strong networks of executive functions. Without this preparation to develop executive functions during the school years, students can fall short. They may lack requirements for higher education and the competitive job market including the skill sets needed for cognitive flexibility, successful communication, collaboration, or creative innovation.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Creative-Thinking

 

ava smith's curator insight, January 11, 11:55 PM
Hello Guys I will complete your assignments any of subjects for cheap Price with quality work Provide you complete solutions..with turnitin Report 0% Plagiarism Guarantee.. Unlimited Revision Free Of Cost 100% Live Support Cheap Price Grauntee High Quality Guarantee to Other 100% Passed Grauntee Before Deadline Delivery Guarantee Regards & Thanks Keith WhatsApp:+61-451059254,+44-7958580065 Email:cheaponlineassignmenthelp@gmail.com http://btechndassignment.cheapassignmenthelp.co.uk/ www.onlineassignmenthelp.com.au www.cheapassignmenthelp.co.uk www.freeassignmenthelp.acom
Benjamin Boorman's curator insight, January 14, 9:41 PM
Synopsis
Teaching creatively, no matter the age group, grade level, or subject matter, not only improves the students’ creativity skills but also enhances their executive function networks.

… To be ready for college, the workforce, and a life in a technological society, students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize, and analyze an overwhelming volume of information … Executive Functions plus a strong base of core knowledge are the essential skills for success in today’s world. For students to think critically, collaboratively, and communicate effectively, these must be strengthened.

 

To adequately prepare for success in careers or higher education, students need guided opportunities to construct strong networks of executive functions. Without this preparation to develop executive functions during the school years, students can fall short. They may lack requirements for higher education and the competitive job market including the skill sets needed for cognitive flexibility, successful communication, collaboration, or creative innovation.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Creative-Thinking

 

Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Teach How the Brain Learns

5 Ways to Teach How the Brain Learns | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Today Ramona Persaud @ramonap director of the film, Grey Matters, talks about how we can teach kids the way the brain learns. Check out the free resource: Goodbye Teacher Tired: 5 Days to Doing Fewer Things Better from Angela Watson. Save time. Teach better. Listen Now Listen to the show on iTunes or Stitcher Stream […]
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an interesting read and might be helpful for teachers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Can sadness be good for reading? - The Hechinger Report

Can sadness be good for reading? - The Hechinger Report | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I’ve always assumed that students who were happy at school would be more receptive to learning lessons that day. And if they were sad, or having a bad day with classmates or the teacher, well, then they might not learn so much. So a recent study suggesting just the opposite caught my attention, especially since …
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Neuroscientist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang made the argument ... that emotions don’t interfere with learning, as is commonly thought, but are critical for building memories and engaging in complex thoughts."

Sometimes we have to question our taken-for-granted ways of understanding that guide us in our teaching.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
Scoop.it!

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information.

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article is based on research about what happens chemically in one's brain when children become curious.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

Brain Imaging Reveals ADHD as a Collection of Different Disorders

Brain Imaging Reveals ADHD as a Collection of Different Disorders | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Source: Elsevier.

Researchers have found that patients with different types of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impairments in unique brain systems, indicating that there may not be a one-size-fits-all explanation for the cause of the disorder. Based on performance on behavioral tests, adolescents with ADHD fit into one of three subgroups, where each group demonstrated distinct impairments in the brain with no common abnormalities between them.

The study, published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, has the potential to radically reframe how researchers think about ADHD. “This study found evidence that clearly supports the idea that ADHD-diagnosed adolescents are not all the same neurobiologically,” said first author Dr. Michael Stevens, of the Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Hartford, CT, and Yale University. Rather than a single disorder with small variations, the findings suggest that the diagnosis instead encompasses a “constellation” of different types of ADHD in which the brain functions in completely different ways.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It makes sense.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Evolution of Education
Scoop.it!

How School Leaders Can Attend to the Emotional Side of Change

How School Leaders Can Attend to the Emotional Side of Change | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ When teachers, parents and students are asked to change how they have been doing things, it often involves an element of loss that doesn't get recognized in the”
Via Skip Zalneraitis, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Change is often about loss and we go through the stages of grief. As well, including teachers, students, parents, etc. in the conversation is essential.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Technology in Art And Education
Scoop.it!

The 7 pillars of classroom practice

The 7 pillars of classroom practice | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Not all research is perfect – or even worth reading, argues Nick Rose. But here, he presents a septet of reliable reviews that time-pressed teachers can bet their house on being useful in the classroom
There are two main problems with the idea that teachers should be reading research. The first is that they don’t have time to do it (see bit.ly/UnreadResearch). Studies by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) have examined methods of encouraging teachers to engage with academic research but report that time pressures – and a lack of opportunities for teachers to work together – appear to undermine the initiatives.

So, if we genuinely want teaching to be a research-informed profession, we should reduce the number of hours we expect teachers to work – and ultimately set aside some time for teachers to read and apply research to their practice.

Via Mel Riddile, Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a long and winding article, which explores some of the research about mindset, memory, changing learner attitudes, etc. Nick Rose argues teachers should be given time to be current on the research if it is to be useful and meaningful to their practices.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

What every teacher should know about ... memory and the brain

What every teacher should know about ... memory and the brain | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In a new series of articles on how psychology research can inform teaching, Bradley Busch picks an academic study – and makes sense of it for the classroom. This time: a project on long-term memory

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a research based article. Teachers need to have some idea of how the brain functions and how we create and recall memories.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from A Change in Perspective
Scoop.it!

Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds

Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
New discoveries about the human mind show the limitations of reason.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The studies propose cooperation and reason are essential to changing minds. We have to trust others to change a point of view that has become ingrained. Parker Palmer wrote that facts are related to how we understand the world. Trust is essential in changing minds.

The studies referred to could be helpful in teaching media and information literacy.
more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, October 5, 2017 11:25 AM

The writer talks about "Confirmation Bias:"  Comes down to "Don't confuse me with facts."  -Lon

GLOBALHACKERS.RU's curator insight, October 30, 2017 12:42 PM
GET WESTERN UNION transfer,PAYPAL transfer, BANK TRANSFER, MONEYGRAM TRANSFER/LOGINS, CCTOP UP visit www.globalhackers.ru 100% LEGIT PAYPAL ACCOUNTS/transfers,WESTERN UNION transfers,BANK TRANSFER,MONEYGRAM TRANSFER/LOGINS,CCTOP UP, >> WWW.globalhackers.ru **** WE PROVIDE LIVE SCREEN SHARE OR VIDEO PROOF OF ACCOUNTS OR TRANSFERS BEFORE PAYMENT IS MADE!. ****WE DO NOT SELL ANY FAKE WU BUG SOFTWARE, NO DUMB PAYPAL MONEY ADDERS, NO PAID TO CLICK, FOREX,HYIP... ****WE DEAL STRICTLY ON TRANSFERS AND LOGINS. ALL transfers are legit and backed by secure dedicated offshore servers.. ****no charge back or trace backs. we have moneyback and Rienburstment policy with 24/7 support. official website---visit http://www.globalhackers.ru contact email _____ globalhackers01gmail.com contact skype ______ wu hackerz contact website_____ www.globalhackers.ru contact icq ______ 701247445 contact phone ______ +1(251-589-7809 contact fb ______ globalhackers OR http://globalhackers01.blogspot.com/ https://turbopurchase.wordpress.com/ >>>>>>> *** www.globalhackers.ru*** <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>> Visit *** www.globalhackers.ru *** for real screenshot proof of accounts and transfers.
Media&Multiculturalism_Fall 2017's curator insight, November 4, 2017 2:27 PM
This article talks about studies that show that people have trouble changing their minds about topics even when confronted with facts that their opinions or beliefs are wrong. It also mentions that people have a tendency to reject things that do not align with their views and accept things that do. I think this article is very relevant in today's day and age of Donald Trump. Think back to the problems that faced Facebook during the election campaigns; Facebook got a lot of heat for tailoring their ads towards people's predetermined views (that Facebook knew based on data collection of peoples' clicks, likes, and reposts). There was outrage that by curating ads and such to people's held opinions, people were never able to see the other sides of issues and were constantly reading things that reinforced their views. This article makes me wonder if it would have even mattered if Facebook had shown all its users variety in campaign news, because according to this article, people would have ignored or not believed articles or news that conflicted with what they thought to be true. This also might be one reason why this country is so divided right now; even when people are shown facts that challenge their beliefs, they cling almost tighter to their own pre-conceived notions. The study suggests that reason fails us today because the environment had changed faster than natural selection. This means that in a world where fake news, fake studies, and fake stories all over Twitter, it is almost too hard to sift through it all and create the right perception of everything. Instead of trying to reason, it is easier for people to stick with what they feel is the vest answer to something. It will be curious to see how this difficulty in accepting new facts and truths will evolve in this country, especially in the rest of Donald Trump's presidency. 

-Chief Awuku
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Technology in Art And Education
Scoop.it!

Memory For Details Matures Gradually

Memory For Details Matures Gradually | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Summary: Contrary to popular assumption that areas of the brain responsible for memory are fully matured by age six, researchers report the maturation process continues until the age of at least 14.

Source: Max Planck Institute.

High-resolution imaging provides new insights into the development of the human brain.

In contrast to previous assumptions, the hippocampus, a brain structure that is central to learning and memory, does not complete its maturation until adolescence. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, the Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, and the University of Stirling were able to show this for the first time using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. The study’s findings were recently published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).


Via iPamba, Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This makes sense.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Brains may need flexible networks to learn well

Brains may need flexible networks to learn well | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
New data suggest that brain cells may learn best when they are able to easily make and break off communications with neighbors — or distant brain regions.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The brain is made up not of isolated regions, but of regions that work together in the form of networks. These networks can change as we learn and use our brains in different ways.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from :: The 4th Era ::
Scoop.it!

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How do children gain a deeper understanding of how they think, feel, and act so that they can improve their learning and develop meaningful relationships? Since antiquity, philosophers have been intrigued with how human beings develop self-awareness -- the ability to examine and understand who we are relative to the world around us. Today, research not only shows that self-awareness evolves during childhood, but also that its development is linked to metacognitive processes of the brain.

Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Understanding and reflecting on how we learn is essential to learning. It is interesting that philosophers and neuroscientists are working together in the area of metacognition.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

School, Self-Regulation, and the Brain - Learning and the Brain blog

School, Self-Regulation, and the Brain - Learning and the Brain blog | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

From Learning and the Brain June Newsletter:


"A just-published study asks about the effect of schooling on the brain. (A chatty, readable summary by one of the authors can be found here.)

More specifically, it looks at a young child’s ability to self-regulate: a skill that early schooling emphasizes–and, of course, one that’s highly necessary for sustained success in almost any meaningful activity or relationship.

The authors take advantage of the arbitrary cut-off date for schooling, and look at brain development for children who were just old enough–or not quite old enough–to enroll in 1st grade.

The research question was: can we find meaningful differences in self-regulatory areas of the brain after a year of 1st grade (children just within the cut-off date) compared to a year of kindergarten (children just beyond the cut-off date)? Did these brains develop alike over the course of this year, as part of typical human development? Or, did the more academic structure of 1st grade influence brains to develop differently than the more playful freedom of kindergarten?"


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Yes, school and structure change brains. What role does play play in the structure?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity
Scoop.it!

Jazz improvisers score high on creativity

Jazz improvisers score high on creativity | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Jazz musicians’ creativity linked to brain dexterity.

Via june holley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Whether it is dialogue, leading, teaching, etc., improvising is essential. Jazz musicians are great at improvsing and playing off each other.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Why Teens Find The End Of The World So Appealing

Why Teens Find The End Of The World So Appealing | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Dystopian novels are all about consequences, choices and grey areas. And psychologists say that plays right into the sweet spot of the developing teenage brain.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I found books that veered from happy, utopian plot lines opened up conversations and led to questions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Problem Solving Buffers The Brain Against Anxiety, Suggests New Study

Problem Solving Buffers The Brain Against Anxiety, Suggests New Study | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Giving the brains of anxiety sufferers problems to solve could protect them from worsening anxiety, suggests a new study.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an interesting conclusion.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

Music only helps you concentrate if you’re doing the right kind of task

Music only helps you concentrate if you’re doing the right kind of task | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How sound affects performance has been the topic of laboratory research for over 40 years, and is observed through a phenomenon called the irrelevant sound effect.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Music can both distract and become irrelevant background noise.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

How to Improve Brain Function and Reverse Poverty's Impact on Student Learning - EdSurge News

How to Improve Brain Function and Reverse Poverty's Impact on Student Learning - EdSurge News | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Poverty is everyone's problem. The “new normal” in U.S. public schools is that 51 percent of all students come from low-income families. This ha
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The argument made in the article is children who come from impoverished backgrounds need practice at learning the skills they have not yet learned. Their brains work quite well
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Links to Keep
Scoop.it!

These two brains both belong to three-year-olds, so why is one so much bigger?

These two brains both belong to three-year-olds, so why is one so much bigger? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Take a careful look at the image of two brains on this page. The picture is of the brains of two three-year-old children. It’s obvious that the brain on the left is much bigger than the one on the right. The image on the left also has fewer spots, and far fewer dark “fuzzy” areas. To neurologists who
Via Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is essential reading for teachers.
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, October 24, 2017 8:55 PM
Wow! Be sure and read this!
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Cibereducação
Scoop.it!

Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension

Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Data suggest that taking notes by hand beats typing notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over time.

Via Les Howard, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is not only effective for long-term comprehension and retention. There are other benefits. Writing is a right brain activity as we usually are taking short cuts in notes. Keyboarding is a left brain activity. A conversation engages both hemispheres.


more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 18, 2017 11:37 AM
I've read about many a famous author who writes first drafts in longhand on yellow legal pads. Personally, I like the feel of writing with pen and paper, then transcribing into a Word document. This process seems to fully engage the creative brain.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Memory For Details Matures Gradually

Memory For Details Matures Gradually | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In contrast to previous assumptions, the hippocampus, a brain structure that is central to learning and memory, does not complete its maturation until adolescence. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, the Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, and the University of Stirling were able to show this for the first time using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. The study’s findings were recently published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

If you ask younger children what they had for supper the evening before, they are likely to respond with a general statement rather than exact details. For instance, they say “cheese” rather than “cheddar”. Children are good at categorizing experiences, but not as good at remembering details. Despite these observations, most researchers assumed that brain regions that are responsible for memorizing and recalling details are already fully mature by the age of six years. This new study now shows that the maturation process lasts until the age of about 14 years.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This makes sense and is useful for teachers, particularly those of younger students.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience and Neuromyths

Neuroscience and Neuromyths | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Among the general population, 93% of people incorrectly believe that “individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style.” That number falls to 76% among teachers–but is almost identical (78%) for teachers who know from neuroscience.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers need to familiarize themselves with the latest in neuroscience and question their practices.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Education and Training
Scoop.it!

Why Students Forget—and What You Can Do About It by Youki Terada

Why Students Forget—and What You Can Do About It by Youki Terada | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Our brains are wired to forget, but there are research-backed strategies you can use to make your teaching stick.


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ines Bieler, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Our brains our wired to forget. One of the strategies to help students with memory is to allow them to have conversations with peers. This was recommended by Sam Intrator. I found it useful in my classroom.
more...
Thomas Moore's curator insight, September 26, 2017 6:07 AM

I'll never forget the day I remembered

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, October 9, 2017 7:49 AM
Very interesting supposition that "Our brains are wired to forget" and that we need to "optimize decision-making". This applies to more than just students (imo).
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Design Thinking
Scoop.it!

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
So yea, you know how the left brain is really realistic, analytical, practical, organized, and logical, and the right brain is so darn creative, passionate, sensual, tasteful, colorful, vivid, and poetic?

Via Jose Baldaia
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Research is demonstrating that the neuroscience of creativity is more like a conversation between different parts of the brain. It is not isolated to one region or another.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from E-teaching and Inspiration
Scoop.it!

7 mighty benefits of writing by hand

7 mighty benefits of writing by hand | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
While pen and paper may seem poised on the edge of obscurity, writing by hand offers a bevy of brain-boosting perks that should not be lost to technology.

Via Collection of First, Arturo B
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I argue for continued cursive writing in school. The seven benefits underscore this.
more...
No comment yet.