Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Critical Thinking for Educators

Critical Thinking for Educators | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"Pick any article from the newspaper," I would say to my students. "Bring it in and we'll analyze it." This was one of my favourite
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a lengthy and challenging article about what critical thinking is and is not. What it does point out is that, like so many things teachers are asked to do, short cuts do not work.
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Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and a Revolutionary Praxis for Education, Part I

Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and a Revolutionary Praxis for Education, Part I | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"For educators in the present-day context of a neoliberal assault on the very idea of schooling as a public good, Freire’s opus resonates even more keenly. When faux-reformers see curricula as “deliverables” and student learning as a “product,” when schools themselves are reduced to commodities like different brands of consumer goods, Freire’s repudiation of instrumentalist logic assumes a fierce new relevance. In an era where elites seem to view the basic humanity of so many of the world’s residents as a proposition open to debate, to assert the agency and worth of all of our students can be an act of revolutionary praxis for educators. Perhaps the best evidence of the revolutionary nature of Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed is in how much it still has to teach us."

 

Via Audrey Watters

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

A profound appreciation of Freire for those confronting the cultural warfare in public education today. Author Paul Gannon makes a real attempt to construct the rarified language of pedagogical/revolutionary discourse in terms that can be usefully navigated by those unaccustomed to this terrain.


Via Jim Lerman, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Freire's greatest contribution was the cautionary words that we not become "armchair revolutionaries." For people to speak, they must discover their voice. We have fallen into the malaise of trite and facile language i.e. empower, win-win, school reform, etc. as if those words engage people in changing their lives. It is through discovering one's voice and expressing what that means that we humanize education.
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