Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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The 20% Rule: Applying the Secret of Benjamin Franklin and Isaac Newton

The 20% Rule: Applying the Secret of Benjamin Franklin and Isaac Newton | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
He was getting into a bath when he noticed that the water level rose as he entered the tub. His sudden insight being that the volume of water displaced must be equal to the volume of the part of his…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The idea is to provide time to just let things happen. Many new ideas are arrived at by accident and in unexpected ways i.e. penicillin.

This means letting time for students to just be and allow for a certain amount of randomness and chaos. We had cards, board games, time for conversation, and time outside almost everyday.
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Emergence and Growth of Knowledge and Diversity in Hierarchically Complex Living Systems

Emergence and Growth of Knowledge and Diversity in Hierarchically Complex Living Systems | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
An environment conducting a flux of energy and materials between temporally or spatially separated sources and sinks may become more complexly structured due to the emergence of cyclical, dissipative transport systems. Selection favors transport systems able to stabilize themselves against environmental perturbations through feedback. Continuing selection for self-stabilization over long periods of time may eventuate…

Via june holley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a link at the bottom to a working paper (PDF format) that expands on the subject. It draws on Karl Popper and Maturano and Varela.
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How to overcome a stalemate

How to overcome a stalemate | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Each month, When Growth Stalls examines why businesses and brands struggle and how they can overcome their obstacles and resume growth. Steve McKee is the president of McKee Wallwork + Co., an advertising agency that specializes in working with stalled, stuck and stale brands.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Hans-Georg Gadamer said dialog emerges from mis-understanding as opposed to understanding. Jean Piaget claimed when we are disturbed and entered a state of disequlibrium we sought a new state of equilbrium.
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Planning In Fog

Planning In Fog | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I work with people who run organizations. They need to make numerous decisions everyday. How can we learn and improve in a complex environment that is always changing? The Executive Directors of six…

Via Philippe Vallat
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The future is always uncertain, so planning is an uncertain process. Ask any teacher if there lesson plans ever unfold exactly as they planned.
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Perspectives from Complexity – Our Future at Work – Medium

Perspectives from Complexity – Our Future at Work – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In a previous series of articles, I spoke about releasing complexity. In this series I am concerned with new perspectives about organizational life, at all scales, that emerge from the complexity…

Via june holley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Complexity and chaos have much to offer. William Doll explored it from a curricular perspective. It is about patterns and uncertainty in our teaching and work.
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Ten ideas that changed my teaching: #1 There is no average student

Ten ideas that changed my teaching: #1 There is no average student | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I don’t think anyone would argue that all people are the same. Sure we’re made of the same DNA, we all smell, get hungry, angry, laugh and spend most of our lives trying to discover who we are and…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Miloš Bajčetić, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is no average student and one-size-does-not-fit-all. Jaggedness (Alan Watts' wiggly world concept), complexity (even chaos), context, different paths, and breaking from the idea of average are essential to be a teacher and move away from conformity and compliance.

Differences make a difference.
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Great Teachers Don't Teach

Great Teachers Don't Teach | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Blogger Ben Johnson outlines constructivist and experiential teaching techniques that go beyond direct instruction.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The objective is that good teachers create an environment where each student's learning can emerge. I don't think that means they don't teach. Gert Biesta uses John Dewey in his writing argues that teaching is relational. Having a strong grasp of content, being able to deliver it, caring for one's students, etc. each go into creating the environment where learning can emerge.
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, October 6, 2017 11:48 AM

"One characteristic of an effective teacher is that they don't teach. You say that is outrageous. How can an effective teacher teach without teaching?

 

My experience is that good teachers care about students. Good teachers know the content and know how to explain it. Good teachers expect and demand high levels of performance of students. Good teachers are great performers and storytellers that rivet their students' attention.

 

All of this is good but great teachers engineer learning experiences that maneuver the students into the driver's seat and then the teachers get out of the way. Students learn best by personally experiencing learning that is physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual. John Dewey had it right in 1935 when he espoused his theories on experiential learning. Today we call this constructivism."

 

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"The word "teacher" implies the flow of knowledge and skills from one person to another. Whether it be a lecture, or a power point, it involves talking at the students. While that is commonly viewed as the quickest and easiest way to impart knowledge and skills, we all realize that it is not the most effective. Socrates had it right when he only answered a question with more questions and look what he produced -- some of the greatest minds that ever lived. We call this the Socratic method.

 

Yes, there are times when direct instruction is necessary, but only to be able to do something with that knowledge or skill, but a great teacher devises learning experiences that force all the students to be engaged much like being in the deep end of the swimming pool. Then the lesson on arm and leg strokes becomes relevant. To learn, the students must do something. We call this performance-based learning."

 

(...)

 

"Returning to my original premise: great teachers do not teach. They stack the deck so that students have a reason to learn and in the process can't help but learn mainly by teaching themselves. This knowledge then becomes permanent and cherished rather than illusory and irrelevant."

DEGERT Louis's curator insight, October 11, 2017 4:32 AM
Improving teacher's efficiency 
Margaret Annen's curator insight, October 22, 2017 5:03 PM
"Great Teachers Don't Teach" really sums it up with the idea that real teaching doesn't take place until the student does on their own.  This article relates to my project because I believe one way teachers can learn how to let go is for them to be in the same situation as they need to let their students be and that is be left to do.  The only issue perhaps is educators may go through and experience doing, but giving up the control is hard because day in and day out you have been doing the doing. I believe learning how to let go must be accomplished by learning how to let go.  Educators must plan a lesson and say include one or two steps of letting go.  Then they must build on it, so that day after day they themselves feel comfortable with letting go.  Managing a classroom of students who must do specific things on their own looks and feels different because the students are engaged to the point that they do not want to be interrupted rather they are feverishly and committed to learning.