Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Exploring the Changing Social Contexts of Learning

Exploring the Changing Social Contexts of Learning | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Contemporary learning environments might be best understood when viewed as a complex mix of environments and overlapping social networks. Learners fluidly move between social networks and their learning is influenced by their participation within and across these physical and virtual networks. Understanding how mobile, global and virtual social networks influence our interpretation of socio-cultural theories of learning might allow us to better understand the interplay of settings and contexts within which learning occurs and in doing so better understand how learning may be facilitated.

The socio-cultural perspective on education has its origins in the work of Lev Vygotsky (Göncü & Gauvain, 2012) and is an approach which considers the individual and their interactions with the social environment as central to understanding the processes of learning. Learning is said to be that which occurs through interaction between the individual, and all that their biology brings to the table and the social context in which learning occurs. Such an approach shifts our thinking about learning and development as processes contained and constrained within the individual’s biology to a more diverse understanding that incorporates the social context within which all learning is seen to occur. For educators, this approach encourages us to look at the learning environment and the social context in which the learning we design for our students occurs and 'presents a fuller and more accurate picture of children’s learning and development.' (Göncü & Gauvain, 2012 p126) Sociocultural, and the in some ways related social-cognitive approaches build upon earlier research that focused on the individual as the unit of development but seek to explain the differences which were observed across groups and contexts which could not be explained without a wider frame of reference.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Lev Vygotsky wrote at a similar time to John Dewey. Their views of how social context informs learning, therefore teaching, overlap in many ways.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Teacher Tools and Tips
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What is Otherness?

What is Otherness? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
George Herbert Mead’s classic text, Mind Self and Society, established that social identities are created through our ongoing social interaction with other people and our subsequent self-reflection about who we think we are according to these social exchanges. Mead’s work shows that identities are produced through agreement, disagreement, and negotiation with other people. We adjust our behaviour and our self-image based upon our interactions and our self-reflection about these interactions (this is also known as the looking glass self).

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we perceive someone as a stranger, we "other" them. Although the post is sociological in nature, philosophers (Derrida, Levinas, Butler, etc.) took up the topic.
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