Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Growth mindset: practical tips you may not have tried yet

Growth mindset: practical tips you may not have tried yet | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Schools and teachers across the world have embraced Carol Dweck’s theory of growth mindset in the hope of helping students to fulfil their potential. Popular strategies include tweaking the way teachers give feedback, encouraging self-reflection through questioning and, crucially, praising processes instead of natural ability.

Via Mel Riddile
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are good ideas here: explore multiple strategies, be stealthy rather than controlling, engage parents, and explore your own mindset.
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Give Yourself Permission to Screw Up – Personal Growth – Medium

Give Yourself Permission to Screw Up – Personal Growth – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Millions of people are obsessed with perfection. This obsession makes it difficult to make a decision without wasting too much time analyzing every detail. Don’t get me wrong, it pays to get things…
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Making mistakes is an essential part of learning, therefore an essential part of teaching.
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Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU

Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
What would you say are a few of the biggest myths about growth mindset?

OK, myth No.1 is the myth that it’s all about effort, and that you instil it by praising effort. Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset. Adults have nagged children for centuries to try harder. That’s not a growth mindset, it’s an adult nagging a child to try harder!

Also, we find that when teachers think it’s just about effort and praising effort they may praise effort that isn’t even there, or that’s not effective. So if a child tries hard at something and you say ‘great job, you tried hard’, but they didn’t make progress, they didn’t advance, you’re actually conveying a fixed mindset because you’re saying ‘great effort, I didn’t really expect you to do that, and I don’t expect you to do that, so I’m trying to make you feel good about not doing it’. So we need people to understand that it’s appreciating a variety of process variables that lead to learning.

The second myth is that you can teach students a lesson on growth mindset and put a poster up in the front of the room, and that’s that, that they will have a growth mindset from then on. And we know if the teacher doesn’t then embody a growth mindset, if teachers don’t embody growth mindsets in their teaching practices, in the way that they give feedback when the child is stuck, and the way they present a new unit, in the way that they give opportunities for revision and growth of understanding – if they don’t embody that growth mindset, they are not teaching it. And in fact, if their behaviour contradicts the poster at the front of the room, then maybe they’re doing a disservice.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES, Joyce Valenza
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Carol Dweck outlines several myths about the pychology of a growth mindset.
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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, August 14, 2017 8:57 AM
An interview with Dr. Dweck that offers insights and counters myths.
Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 14, 2017 12:27 PM
Interview with always interesting Carol Dweck. I appreciate the nuance of what she is discussing here. 
 
Ian Berry's curator insight, August 14, 2017 7:15 PM
Great reminders of several aspects what I call appreciative leadership.  "Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset."
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Is It Just Me? When Learners Think They Can't Because Others Can

Is It Just Me? When Learners Think They Can't Because Others Can | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
If we truly want to help students develop a growth mindset, we need to dispel the myth that people are born with great talent or that true geniuses don’t have to work hard. In order to effectively coach students, educators need a deep understanding that learning is a transferable skill. We can all benefit from reflecting on how we have improved our abilities in the past and transfer those same principles to other areas. Students need to learn strategies to process through the events that are happening around them. When they witness easy success, educators can help students hear their fixed mindset thoughts and give them the tools to respond with a growth mindset voice. This will help them stay focused on their learning process instead of being distracted by what others are doing, and ultimately grow as learners.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Self-talk as a form of questioning what our experiences are can be helpful in our learning. What do we know about ourselves?
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Sharrock's curator insight, July 7, 2017 10:20 AM
"Students often don’t understand transfer of learning. They don’t know what past experiences other students have had that help them pick up new skills quickly. They may not be aware of what background knowledge other students are connecting to the new situation. For example, what if the 8 year old Roberto knew that his physical education classmate had been playing baseball for 4 years, and routinely engages in other hand-eye coordination activities such as ping pong and basketball at home? What if Caleb would have known that the girl sitting next to him in math class, has been using fractions to make recipes at home with her 2 older siblings. What if Makena would have known that her dynamic speaking classmate had been doing readings at her church since she was 6 years old?" (from the article)
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Why Growth Mindset Isn't What You Think It Is

Why Growth Mindset Isn't What You Think It Is | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
WHY GROWTH MINDSET ISN'T WHAT YOU THINK IT IS
Growth mindset is one of the most well-known psychological theories in education. But in the rush to embrace it, have most people misunderstood what it actually is?

Most articles and blogs about growth mindset will have a brief growth mindset definition that goes along the lines of ‘growth mindset is knowing that ability or intelligence is not fixed and can be improved with effort’.

Only the first half of that definition is accurate. Growth mindset is the belief that they can improve their intelligence. Effort may be one strategy that can be employed in order to do so. It is not the only one. Equating growth mindset just with effort is a mistake for several reasons and could potentially do more harm than good.  So before I outline some of the potential reasons why this is bad, it is important to explain how this misconception came about.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Growth mindset is a theory about learning, which is messy and complex. That is a telling statement. The caution that emerges is praising effort when someone is working hard and failing is not a good plan. It is about asking good questions that help the student grow. John Dewey proposed the idea of growth was to foster more growth. Students need good feedback that moves them forward.
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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | #ProfessionalDevelopment #ModernEDU

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | #ProfessionalDevelopment #ModernEDU | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES, Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A growth mindset among teachers is essential to their growth as teachers. John Dewey wrote about this extensively. Keith Haggart points out modelling, new ideas, time for self-reflection, and formative feedback are important. However, these are not in evidence in many schools.
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Tea Vella's curator insight, May 31, 2017 7:26 PM
A really insightful article about Carol Dweck's Fixed vs Growth mindset theory. 
Alana Ford's comment, June 3, 2017 4:58 AM
Found this article very insightful.
Jillian Schaibly's curator insight, July 25, 2017 9:43 PM
This article talks about professional development with teachers and staff and understanding how to make us worth while for everyone. As a administrator professional development needs to be planned and thought out. Also needs to be relevant to the staff that is participating.
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Carol Dweck Explains The “False” Growth Mindset That Worries Her | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU 

Carol Dweck Explains The “False” Growth Mindset That Worries Her | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
False growth mindset is saying you have growth mindset when you don’t really have it or you don’t really understand [what it is]. It’s also false in the sense that nobody has a growth mindset in everything all the time. Everyone is a mixture of fixed and growth mindsets. You could have a predominant growth mindset in an area but there can still be things that trigger you into a fixed mindset trait.

 

Something really challenging and outside your comfort zone can trigger it, or, if you encounter someone who is much better than you at something you pride yourself on, you can think “Oh, that person has ability, not me.” So I think we all, students and adults, have to look for our fixed-mindset triggers and understand when we are falling into that mindset.

I think a lot of what happened [with false growth mindset among educators] is that instead of taking this long and difficult journey, where you work on understanding your triggers, working with them, and over time being able to stay in a growth mindset more and more, many educators just said, “Oh yeah, I have a growth mindset” because either they know it’s the right mindset to have or they understood it in a way that made it seem easy.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/pssst-the-most-important-in-education-understanding/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/getting-ready-for-modern-education-first-try-to-understand-what-it-is/

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, December 16, 2016 3:38 PM
False growth mindset is saying you have growth mindset when you don’t really have it or you don’t really understand [what it is]. It’s also false in the sense that nobody has a growth mindset in everything all the time. Everyone is a mixture of fixed and growth mindsets. You could have a predominant growth mindset in an area but there can still be things that trigger you into a fixed mindset trait.

 

Something really challenging and outside your comfort zone can trigger it, or, if you encounter someone who is much better than you at something you pride yourself on, you can think “Oh, that person has ability, not me.” So I think we all, students and adults, have to look for our fixed-mindset triggers and understand when we are falling into that mindset.

I think a lot of what happened [with false growth mindset among educators] is that instead of taking this long and difficult journey, where you work on understanding your triggers, working with them, and over time being able to stay in a growth mindset more and more, many educators just said, “Oh yeah, I have a growth mindset” because either they know it’s the right mindset to have or they understood it in a way that made it seem easy.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/pssst-the-most-important-in-education-understanding/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/getting-ready-for-modern-education-first-try-to-understand-what-it-is/

 

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How Showing and Telling Kids ‘I Believe in You’ Can Empower (Engage) Them at School

The types of messages students receive can make a difference in how eager they are to learn subjects like math.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Engage is a better word than empower. To empower is to give power. To engage is to enter into a conversation. Teaching is a deeply relational practice.
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Foster A Growth Mindset in Your Class Using These Strategies | #ModernEDU

Foster A Growth Mindset in Your Class Using These Strategies | #ModernEDU | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

August , 2017
In her celebrated book ‘Mindset: The New Psychology of Success’, Stanford university psychologist Carol S. Dweck makes a strong case backed up with  scientific evidence for the power of mindset in shaping one’s success or failure in almost every facet of our life.Those with a fixed mindset mentality tend to be limited in their learning scope believing that their inner traits and abilities are biologically determined. On the other hand, people with a growth mindset embrace change and tend to learn more from life experiences because for them concepts such as skills, abilities and competencies are not fixated  and can be developed through a process of error and trial.

In today’s post, we are sharing with you this handy infographic we created based on Marcus Guido’s post ’10 Ways Teachers Can Instill a Growth Mindset in Students’. Guido walks you through the different strategies you can use with your students to cultivate a growth mindset in your class and ultimately enhance students learning.  Read his post to learn more about each of the strategies featured here.

The visual below is also available in PDF format from this link.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=growth+mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=practice

 


Via Educatorstechnology, Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are excellent ideas in the flow chart i.e. journals, teaching how to deal with challenges, create portfolios to show progress, etc.

Art Costa and Bena Kallick's Habits of Mind would be a nice complement to these.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 15, 2017 12:21 PM

August , 2017
In her celebrated book ‘Mindset: The New Psychology of Success’, Stanford university psychologist Carol S. Dweck makes a strong case backed up with  scientific evidence for the power of mindset in shaping one’s success or failure in almost every facet of our life.Those with a fixed mindset mentality tend to be limited in their learning scope believing that their inner traits and abilities are biologically determined. On the other hand, people with a growth mindset embrace change and tend to learn more from life experiences because for them concepts such as skills, abilities and competencies are not fixated  and can be developed through a process of error and trial.

In today’s post, we are sharing with you this handy infographic we created based on Marcus Guido’s post ’10 Ways Teachers Can Instill a Growth Mindset in Students’. Guido walks you through the different strategies you can use with your students to cultivate a growth mindset in your class and ultimately enhance students learning.  Read his post to learn more about each of the strategies featured here.

The visual below is also available in PDF format from this link.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=growth+mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=practice

 

Diana Jaimes V.'s curator insight, September 2, 2017 9:50 AM
First, this article led me to consider mindset shaping as a powerful tool for learning as any other aspect of life. It explains the difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset that normally refers to people constantly learning from any experience. Since their capabilities are not fixed, these people are never closed to a learning experience and always use the trial and error learning. They proposed an infographic with several strategies to foster a growth mindset in our students some of the steps include the use of diverse teaching strategies, explanations of purposes of abstract thinking, teaching values, among others.
 
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Growth mindset for a more empathetic and collaborative world

Growth mindset for a more empathetic and collaborative world | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Much of the polarization in today’s world may be rooted in fixed mindsets. When people believe in fixed traits, they look to assign traits to other people rather than consider the psychology behind others’ behaviors. Once they assign a trait or quality to someone, they hold onto it.This can happen to people of any religion and across the political spectrum. When it happens to us, we tend to make blanket judgments and use negative labels to describe others rather than ask questions to try to better understand what has led others to their current beliefs." (from the article)


Via Sharrock, june holley
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A growth mindset is one that is holistic, including physical, cognitive, and affective aspects.
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Habits, Groups, and Growth Mindset

Habits, Groups, and Growth Mindset | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How often do you think about which hand to brush your teeth with? Or comb your hair? What about where the bowl for cereal is located? Or the spoons? How is your refrigerator is arranged? Or your clothes drawers? Why are they that way? Habits build up over time, often being introduced to us when…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Provides a brief overview about habits, personal and group, and growth mindset. Raises the legimitate question about what it means to have a growth mindset. Has it become a catch phrase? Proposes reflection as a way to explore whether a peson has a growth mind or not.
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How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture

How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Students also talk about the definitions of fixed and growth mindsets and then talk through various challenges from each perspective. When the school year starts, those lessons continue in the classroom. Every teacher in the Health and Medicine Academy has read Carol Dweck’s book, “Mindset,” and has discussed how to implement it in their classrooms. The school has moved to standards-based grading to emphasize that mistakes are part of learning and that understanding will come.

Via Mel Riddile, Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The challenge might be rapid changes junior high students experience. Teaching them about the benefits of growth mindset might have to be done differently than for high school students. It might be setting the table.
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, June 5, 2017 11:04 AM
Engaging your students in a growth mindset will help them grow into an optimistic, problem solving learner.
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Books that Changed My Perspective – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium

Books that Changed My Perspective – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
This was first published on my mailing list The Looking Glass. Every week, I answer a reader’s question. I need to show some restraint in answering this because I could go on for hours talking about…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am always interested in what others are reading. A coule of books I have in my library i.e. Daniel Kahneman and Carol Dweck. I am intrigued by a book entitled Sapiens.
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