Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Foster A Growth Mindset in Your Class Using These Strategies | #ModernEDU

Foster A Growth Mindset in Your Class Using These Strategies | #ModernEDU | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

August , 2017
In her celebrated book ‘Mindset: The New Psychology of Success’, Stanford university psychologist Carol S. Dweck makes a strong case backed up with  scientific evidence for the power of mindset in shaping one’s success or failure in almost every facet of our life.Those with a fixed mindset mentality tend to be limited in their learning scope believing that their inner traits and abilities are biologically determined. On the other hand, people with a growth mindset embrace change and tend to learn more from life experiences because for them concepts such as skills, abilities and competencies are not fixated  and can be developed through a process of error and trial.

In today’s post, we are sharing with you this handy infographic we created based on Marcus Guido’s post ’10 Ways Teachers Can Instill a Growth Mindset in Students’. Guido walks you through the different strategies you can use with your students to cultivate a growth mindset in your class and ultimately enhance students learning.  Read his post to learn more about each of the strategies featured here.

The visual below is also available in PDF format from this link.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=growth+mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=practice

 


Via Educatorstechnology, Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are excellent ideas in the flow chart i.e. journals, teaching how to deal with challenges, create portfolios to show progress, etc.

Art Costa and Bena Kallick's Habits of Mind would be a nice complement to these.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 15, 2017 12:21 PM

August , 2017
In her celebrated book ‘Mindset: The New Psychology of Success’, Stanford university psychologist Carol S. Dweck makes a strong case backed up with  scientific evidence for the power of mindset in shaping one’s success or failure in almost every facet of our life.Those with a fixed mindset mentality tend to be limited in their learning scope believing that their inner traits and abilities are biologically determined. On the other hand, people with a growth mindset embrace change and tend to learn more from life experiences because for them concepts such as skills, abilities and competencies are not fixated  and can be developed through a process of error and trial.

In today’s post, we are sharing with you this handy infographic we created based on Marcus Guido’s post ’10 Ways Teachers Can Instill a Growth Mindset in Students’. Guido walks you through the different strategies you can use with your students to cultivate a growth mindset in your class and ultimately enhance students learning.  Read his post to learn more about each of the strategies featured here.

The visual below is also available in PDF format from this link.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=growth+mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=practice

 

Diana Jaimes V.'s curator insight, September 2, 2017 9:50 AM
First, this article led me to consider mindset shaping as a powerful tool for learning as any other aspect of life. It explains the difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset that normally refers to people constantly learning from any experience. Since their capabilities are not fixed, these people are never closed to a learning experience and always use the trial and error learning. They proposed an infographic with several strategies to foster a growth mindset in our students some of the steps include the use of diverse teaching strategies, explanations of purposes of abstract thinking, teaching values, among others.
 
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Critical thinking: how to help your students become better learners

Critical thinking: how to help your students become better learners | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Want your class to make the most out of learning opportunities? Try focusing not just on the task itself, but how they approach it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Critical thinking is part of a complex of skills i.e. metacognitive, keeping a journal, self-awareness, etc. Costa and Kallick's Habits of Mind are a great way to teach those skills.
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The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement

The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Metacognition, simply put, is the process of thinking about thinking. It is important in every aspect of school and life, since it involves self-reflection on one’s current position, future goals, potential actions and strategies, and results. At its core, it is a basic survival strategy, and has been shown to be present even in rats.

Perhaps the most important reason for developing metacognition is that it can improve the application of knowledge, skills, and character qualities in realms beyond the immediate context in which they were learned. This can result in the transfer of competencies across disciplines—important for students preparing for real-life situations where clear-cut divisions of disciplines fall away and one must select competencies from the entire gamut of their experience to effectively apply them to the challenges at hand. Even within academic settings, it is valuable—and often necessary—to apply principles and methods across disciplinary lines.

Via Mel Riddile, Наталия Вяткина, MIND Research Institute
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The 16 Habits of Mind (Costa and Kallick) include metacognition.
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 2, 2017 10:28 PM
Metacognition is so very important to improved learning and achievement. Check this article out!
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 18, 2017 12:13 PM
We allow extra time each period so teachers can talk about thinking process in their content area and students can think about thinking. It can improve the application of what they are studying, which provides deeper learning.
Madame Tournesol's curator insight, September 6, 2017 10:38 PM
Metacognition - the key to everything.
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Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This”

Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This” | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ I work part-time with elementary learners – with gifted learners during the school year and teaching maker education camps during the summer. The one thing almost all of them have in common is yelling out, “I can’t do this” when the tasks aren’t completed upon first attempts or get a little too difficult for them. I partially blame this on the way most school curriculum is structured. Too much school curriculum is based on paper for quick and one shot learning experiences (or the comparable online worksheets). Students are asked to do worksheets on paper, answer end-of-chapter questions on paper, write essays on paper, do math problems on paper, fill in the blanks on paper, and pick the correct answer out of a multiple choice set of answers on paper. These tasks are then graded as to the percentage correct and then the teacher moves onto the next task. So it is no wonder that when learners are given hands-on tasks such as those common to maker education, STEM, and STEAM, they sometimes struggle with their completion. Struggles are good. Struggles with authentic tasks mimics real life so much more than completing those types of tasks and assessments done at most schools. Problems like yelling out, “I can’t do this” arise when the tasks get a little too difficult, but ultimately are manageable. I used to work with delinquent kids within Outward Bound-type programs. Most at-risk kids have some self-defeating behaviors including those that result in personal failure. The model for these types of programs is that helping participants push past their self-perceived limitations results in the beginnings of a success rather than a failure orientation. This leads into a success building upon success behavioral cycle.”
Via John Evans
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Metocognition is a skill students can use to reflect on their learning. Peers learning together and helping each other is beneficial.

Something I did was asked students to tell me what they understood about their learning. It told me where the gaps were. They know what they know, but not what they don't know.

Costa and Kallick's 16 Habits of Mind is a good resource to use with students.
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Amrika Nicole's curator insight, December 10, 2017 7:18 PM
Module 2: Conceptualizations of Giftedness and Talent
The power of "yet" in schools and growth mindset is taking off. This year I have created a bulletin board with commonly used phrases that students have used and have changed them to the growth mindset phrase that would go along with it. I think before you can expect your students to have this growth mindset the staff has to believe and use it too. We have spent part of a PD talking about phrases that we use as teacher to make them growth mindset. 
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The 10 Habits (of Mind) of Highly Effective Information Seekers | Designer Librarian 

The 10 Habits (of Mind) of Highly Effective Information Seekers | Designer Librarian  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

I have been on blog-writing hiatus of late due to my new status as a PhD student in Information Science. Happily, this past year has given me plenty of time to delve deeply into the theoretical underpinnings of information literacy and information seeking. I learned a lot, and have been chewing on one problem in particular: What are the missing components of information literacy instruction? What is not currently being addressed?

 

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These habits of mind, based on Costa and Kallick's work, can ground the learning of skills by students. I taught them early in the year and we created posters to refer to throughout the year.
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Playing with Habits of Mind

Playing with Habits of Mind | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The challenge for teachers is to build this understanding in our students. Our task is to enable their intelligence by helping them to understand the habits of mind and to then empower our students to make intelligent choices about the habits they deploy.

Via Nik Peachey, Audrey Foster
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I used Habits of Mind with my students and it was something that helped their learning. It gave them opportunities to be responsible for their learning.
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Norton Gusky's curator insight, December 1, 2016 8:42 AM
I never thought about using game-based learning with Habits of Mind, but here you have a set of playing cards that lends itself to a game challenge. 
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 5, 2016 1:38 PM
When taught in a way that students can understand them, the habits of mind work very well.