Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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The Expert Generalist: Why the Future Belongs to Polymaths

Aristotle practically invented half a dozen fields of study across philosophy. Galileo was as much a physicist as he was an engineer when he helped kick-start the scientific revolution. Da Vinci…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Being a generalist allows me to not even notice arbitrary boundaries, which are human constructs.
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3 Things Great Teachers Do via @coolcatteacher 

Global Teacher Prize finalist Joe Fatheree talks about what great teachers do. He shares his observations and also his hopes for improving the profession. This encore episode is the number fourteen episode of 2017 on the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast. Check out the free resource: Goodbye Teacher Tired: 5 Days to Doing Fewer Things Better from […]

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The fact we will have a shortfall of 25.8 million teachers by 2030 is scary.

The three things great teachers do are give back to children, teachers inspire children (forget outside of the box; it does not exist), and teachers are authentic.

Great teachers believe they make a difference. Virtures are about the quality of one's character. Consider Aristotle here.
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Why it's up to you to create a civil workplace

Why it's up to you to create a civil workplace | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Did you know that nearly half of the people in your organization are afraid to be civil to one another? According to Georgetown University researcher Christine Porath, more than 40% of employees say they hesitate to show civility at work because they fear people will take advantage of them.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is a sad comment that we are afraid to be civil in our workplace. Schools are places where bullying amongst adults is rampant. Some of it is because of the isolation and we do not know how to step outside the bubble of our classrooms. Teacher civility is essential in the role modeling for students. It is part of our leading them.

In an Aristotlean understandng, rhetoric is more than we say. It is how we comport ourselves in each given moment.
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Studying or Seeking Wisdom - Defining Wisdom | A Project of the University of Chicago - News

Studying or Seeking Wisdom - Defining Wisdom | A Project of the University of Chicago - News | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

‘Experts’, in the sense people complain about, are those with fixed ideas about what should be done in specific situations, working from recipes with the aim of instant results. They avoid or prohibit dialogue, and tend to ignore not only that deliberation takes time but also that it entails the capacity to recognise others’ positions.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
An essential point is we are not born wise. There is a practical essence to wisdom. Aristotle wrote about becoming better as an uncertain process with no well-defined goal. More recently, Hans-Georg Gadamer and Paul Ricoeur used the concepts of phronesis and phronimos as an ethical way of being in the world.
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Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: How Can I Be a Better Teacher Next Fall?

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: How Can I Be a Better Teacher Next Fall? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Educator and blogger Richard Curwin reminds us that it's never too early for teachers to consider how they could improve next fall, and offers us six suggestions for getting started now.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Better is one of those words that does not have a fixed meaning. A good read of Aristotle and Dewey reinforces that understanding. Dewey argued that growth is its own objective. It feeds into more growth. It is better understood through the gerund growing.

The article provides good ideas. One that was interesting was the essay asking to write about "if they were the teacher."
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What is Wisdom and How Do You Get It? – Personal Growth – Medium

I recently wrote about the importance of having a firm “why” — a sense of purpose — behind what you do. Here, I’d like to offer a few additional thoughts on what connects meaningful activities across…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
John Caputo proposes a radical phronesis and wisdom that allows us to deal with ever-shifting contexts in practical and ethical ways.
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Politicizing pedagogy: Teaching for liberty and justice at urban schools

Politicizing pedagogy: Teaching for liberty and justice at urban schools | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Learning about and debating controversial topics is insufficient. Students must grapple with issues that truly matter to their local communities.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Democracy necessitates civil deliberation of thorny political issues. If schools, out of fear, neglect to develop this capacity, students will graduate unprepared to navigate political controversies and potentially reluctant to influence the political contexts that shape their lives."

Teachers in many ways are critical theorists. We may not record the outcomes per se, but we find ways to poke and perturb the tribal ways of thinking that prevail. That includes our own.

The method of currere and hermeneutic phenomenology both acknowledge we bring our own lived-experiences and prejudices to any dialogic forum. Eloquent questions open up the dialogic space and keep it open, bringing new questions forward and challenging the unacknowledged ways we grow to understand the world and people. Curriculum is a contested and not a settled space.
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Opinion | How the Modern World Made Cowards of Us All

Opinion | How the Modern World Made Cowards of Us All | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

The connotation of prudence as caution, or aversion to risk, is a modern invention. “Prudence” comes from the Latin “prudentia,” meaning sagacity or expertise. The earliest English uses from the 14th century had little to do with fearfulness or habitual reluctance. Rather, it signified righteous decision making that is rooted in acuity and practical wisdom.



Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The connotation of prudence as caution, or aversion to risk, is a modern invention. “Prudence” comes from the Latin “prudentia,” meaning sagacity or expertise. The earliest English uses from the 14th century had little to do with fearfulness or habitual reluctance. Rather, it signified righteous decision making that is rooted in acuity and practical wisdom."

When applied to teaching and education, Gadamer described prudence (sageness and expertise) and other virtues i.e. care, imagination, and speaking truthfully as central to a concept known as Bildung. Artistotle used the word phronesis.
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How Making Kindness a Priority Benefits Students

How Making Kindness a Priority Benefits Students | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Achievement is considered a higher priority than caring for others, according to kids surveyed. But having a school and family culture that values kindness can
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This article remijnded me of Aristotle's phronesis (practical wisdom) and phronimos (the wise person). Phronesis places a premium on the good life and kindness in that life. The phronimos (the wise teacher) is thoughtful, tactful, and sensitive to students, teaching as they model. Schools where kindness is the norm have less bullying.
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